2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157687
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Characteristics of Internationally Educated Nurses in the U.S.
Abstract:
Characteristics of Internationally Educated Nurses in the U.S.
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2009
Author:Xu, Yu, PhD, RN, CTN, CNE
P.I. Institution Name:University of Nevada, Las Vegas
Title:Associate Professor/PhD Coordinator
Contact Address:4505 S. Maryland Parkway, Las Vegas, NV, 89154-3018, USA
Contact Telephone:702-895-3175
Co-Authors:Jay Shen, Associate Professor; Helen Zaikina-Montgomery, MA, PhD Candidate
Purpose: To assess the demographic, educational, employment characteristics, and job satisfaction of internationally educated nurses (IENs) as compared with US educated nurses (USNs) using 2004 National Sample Survey of Registered Nurses (NSSRN). Additional comparisons were made with the 2000 NSSRN when appropriate. Background: IENs are becoming a prominent part of the US RN workforce. In 2004, IENs constituted 3.5% of the US RN workforce. However, it is widely believed that this number is grossly under-reported. Little research on this proportion of the US RN workforce is available to date. Method: Secondary analyses were performed on datasets of the 2004 NSSRN. Frequency analyses were performed on the data and differences were examined via chi square and t-tests. Results: The highest proportions of IENs were from the Philippines (46.4%), Canada (23.9%), and the UK (8.0%). While on average IENs are younger (M=46.1) than USNs (M=46.6), in 2004 they were getting older as a group when compared to 2000 (M=45.0). A higher proportion of IENs than USNs held a baccalaureate degree (41.6% vs. 30.4%), whereas USNs mostly held an associate degree (8.7% of IENs vs. 41.6% of USNs). A significantly higher proportion of IENs held a baccalaureate degree in 2004 than in 2000 (47.8% vs. 38.3%). A significantly higher percent of IENs than USNs resided in urban areas (88.8% vs. 74.4%). More IENs than USNs reported being currently employed in nursing (91.2% vs. 88.7%) and more IENs worked full time than USNs (81.5% vs. 70.9%). IENs' and USNs' primary work settings differed significantly with more IENs working in hospitals (70.3%) than USNs (58.8%). Job satisfaction ratings also differed significantly between IENs and USNs. Fewer IENs reported being extremely satisfied with their job than USNs (18.8% vs. 28.4%) and more IENs reported being neither satisfied nor dissatisfied with their current job (12.2% vs. 7.7%). Job satisfaction ratings also differed for IENs between 2000 and 2004: fewer IENs were dissatisfied with their job (16.6% vs. 14.3%) and more were overall satisfied (73.8% vs. 68.2%) with their current position. Implications: The data revealed that IENs retain some previously reported characteristics (still younger and better educated as a group, primarily living in urban areas, mostly working in direct patient care positions in acute care settings). The data also indicated that there are some new emerging characteristics (i.e. aging as a group, accelerating rate of being prepared at the baccalaureate level, higher overall job satisfaction). The observed characteristics of IENs has implications for recruitment, retention, and US nurse workforce planning and policy. In addition, the distributions of IENs' job satisfaction ratings and their tendency to be neutral toward job satisfaction, as well as their interpretation of job satisfaction warrant further examination.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCharacteristics of Internationally Educated Nurses in the U.S.en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157687-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Characteristics of Internationally Educated Nurses in the U.S.</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Xu, Yu, PhD, RN, CTN, CNE</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Nevada, Las Vegas</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor/PhD Coordinator</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">4505 S. Maryland Parkway, Las Vegas, NV, 89154-3018, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">702-895-3175</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">yu.xu@unlv.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Jay Shen, Associate Professor; Helen Zaikina-Montgomery, MA, PhD Candidate</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: To assess the demographic, educational, employment characteristics, and job satisfaction of internationally educated nurses (IENs) as compared with US educated nurses (USNs) using 2004 National Sample Survey of Registered Nurses (NSSRN). Additional comparisons were made with the 2000 NSSRN when appropriate. Background: IENs are becoming a prominent part of the US RN workforce. In 2004, IENs constituted 3.5% of the US RN workforce. However, it is widely believed that this number is grossly under-reported. Little research on this proportion of the US RN workforce is available to date. Method: Secondary analyses were performed on datasets of the 2004 NSSRN. Frequency analyses were performed on the data and differences were examined via chi square and t-tests. Results: The highest proportions of IENs were from the Philippines (46.4%), Canada (23.9%), and the UK (8.0%). While on average IENs are younger (M=46.1) than USNs (M=46.6), in 2004 they were getting older as a group when compared to 2000 (M=45.0). A higher proportion of IENs than USNs held a baccalaureate degree (41.6% vs. 30.4%), whereas USNs mostly held an associate degree (8.7% of IENs vs. 41.6% of USNs). A significantly higher proportion of IENs held a baccalaureate degree in 2004 than in 2000 (47.8% vs. 38.3%). A significantly higher percent of IENs than USNs resided in urban areas (88.8% vs. 74.4%). More IENs than USNs reported being currently employed in nursing (91.2% vs. 88.7%) and more IENs worked full time than USNs (81.5% vs. 70.9%). IENs' and USNs' primary work settings differed significantly with more IENs working in hospitals (70.3%) than USNs (58.8%). Job satisfaction ratings also differed significantly between IENs and USNs. Fewer IENs reported being extremely satisfied with their job than USNs (18.8% vs. 28.4%) and more IENs reported being neither satisfied nor dissatisfied with their current job (12.2% vs. 7.7%). Job satisfaction ratings also differed for IENs between 2000 and 2004: fewer IENs were dissatisfied with their job (16.6% vs. 14.3%) and more were overall satisfied (73.8% vs. 68.2%) with their current position. Implications: The data revealed that IENs retain some previously reported characteristics (still younger and better educated as a group, primarily living in urban areas, mostly working in direct patient care positions in acute care settings). The data also indicated that there are some new emerging characteristics (i.e. aging as a group, accelerating rate of being prepared at the baccalaureate level, higher overall job satisfaction). The observed characteristics of IENs has implications for recruitment, retention, and US nurse workforce planning and policy. In addition, the distributions of IENs' job satisfaction ratings and their tendency to be neutral toward job satisfaction, as well as their interpretation of job satisfaction warrant further examination.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:06:31Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:06:31Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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