2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157688
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Testing a Model of Women's Propensities to Leave Their Abusive Husband
Abstract:
Testing a Model of Women's Propensities to Leave Their Abusive Husband
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2009
Author:Choi, Myunghan, PhD, MPH, APRN, BC
P.I. Institution Name:Arizona State University, College of Nursing & Healthcare Innovation
Title:Assistant Research Professor
Contact Address:500 N. 3rd Street, Phoenix, AZ, 85004-0698, USA
Contact Telephone:602-496-3282
Co-Authors:Michael Belyea, Research Professor; Kathleen Insel, PhD, RN
Background: Domestic violence in Korea is a long-standing cultural problem that was not openly discussed until 1998. Traditionally married women in Korea have not been able to leave their abusive situation because of valued kinship and family structures. Many Korean women are beginning to recognize that what they considered normal treatment is actually domestic violence.  As a consequence, they are becoming less tolerant of abuse and more likely to desire to leave the abusive relationship. Very little empirical research on domestic violence in Korea exists, and there are no studies that test a theoretical model for Korean women's response to abuse. Objective: This study was designed to test a theoretical model that predicts married Korean women's response to abuse. Of particular interest were identifying relationships, directions, and magnitude among the severity of abuse, Hwabyung (a culture-bound syndrome), abuse intolerance, psychological relational power, and socio-structural power. Methods:  Multigroup structural equation modeling () was used to test relationships between variables chosen from the sociostructual and psychological relational power (PRP) to explain intolerance to abuse. Married Korean women (n = 184) from three geographic locations in Korea (Seoul, Pusan, and Daejon) who self-identified as being abused physically, psychologically, sexually or financially participated in the study. Results: There were significant relationships between psychological relational power, abuse and Hwabyung, with low power being related to higher levels of abuse and Hwabyung. There were also significant relationships between abuse, Hwabyung and abuse intolerance.  However, the multigroup analysis revealed that the relationship of abuse and Hwabyung with intolerance only existed for low educated women. Overall the multigroup model adequately fitted the sample data (Chi-square = 92.057; df = 50; p = .000; NFI = .926; CFI = .964; RMSEA = .068; Hoelter's CN = 152), demonstrating that education was a crucial factor in women's attitude toward the unacceptability of abuse and propensity to leave the marriage. Conclusions: Older women with lower education level perceived more PRP, which significantly contributed to women's propensities to leave their abusive husband. Hwabyung was a mediating factor that contributed to women's intolerance to abuse. Implications: This study supported understanding cultural assumptions that guided Korean women's beliefs and behaviors about abuse intolerance, suggesting effective intervention programs should be education specific and resource availability that could clarify the variations in Korean women's response to abuse intolerance.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleTesting a Model of Women's Propensities to Leave Their Abusive Husbanden_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157688-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Testing a Model of Women's Propensities to Leave Their Abusive Husband</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Choi, Myunghan, PhD, MPH, APRN, BC</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Arizona State University, College of Nursing &amp; Healthcare Innovation</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Research Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">500 N. 3rd Street, Phoenix, AZ, 85004-0698, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">602-496-3282</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">mchoi7@asu.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Michael Belyea, Research Professor; Kathleen Insel, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Background: Domestic violence in Korea is a long-standing cultural problem that was not openly discussed until 1998. Traditionally married women in Korea have not been able to leave their abusive situation because of valued kinship and family structures. Many Korean women are beginning to recognize that what they considered normal treatment is actually domestic violence.&nbsp; As a consequence, they are becoming less tolerant of abuse and more likely to desire to leave the abusive relationship. Very little empirical research on domestic violence in Korea exists, and there are no studies that test a theoretical model for Korean women's response to abuse. Objective: This study was designed to test a theoretical model that predicts married Korean women's response to abuse. Of particular interest were identifying relationships, directions, and magnitude among the severity of abuse, Hwabyung (a culture-bound syndrome), abuse intolerance, psychological relational power, and socio-structural power. Methods:&nbsp; Multigroup structural equation modeling () was used to test relationships between variables chosen from the sociostructual and psychological relational power (PRP) to explain intolerance to abuse. Married Korean women (n = 184) from three geographic locations in Korea (Seoul, Pusan, and Daejon) who self-identified as being abused physically, psychologically, sexually or financially participated in the study. Results: There were significant relationships between psychological relational power, abuse and Hwabyung, with low power being related to higher levels of abuse and Hwabyung. There were also significant relationships between abuse, Hwabyung and abuse intolerance.&nbsp; However, the multigroup analysis revealed that the relationship of abuse and Hwabyung with intolerance only existed for low educated women. Overall the multigroup model adequately fitted the sample data (Chi-square = 92.057; df = 50; p = .000; NFI = .926; CFI = .964; RMSEA = .068; Hoelter's CN = 152), demonstrating that education was a crucial factor in women's attitude toward the unacceptability of abuse and propensity to leave the marriage. Conclusions: Older women with lower education level perceived more PRP, which significantly contributed to women's propensities to leave their abusive husband. Hwabyung was a mediating factor that contributed to women's intolerance to abuse. Implications: This study supported understanding cultural assumptions that guided Korean women's beliefs and behaviors about abuse intolerance, suggesting effective intervention programs should be education specific and resource availability that could clarify the variations in Korean women's response to abuse intolerance.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:06:34Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:06:34Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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