2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157690
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Becoming a Nurse: Moral, Cognitive and Skills Development in Nursing Students
Abstract:
Becoming a Nurse: Moral, Cognitive and Skills Development in Nursing Students
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2009
Author:Christiaens, Glenda J., PhD, RN, AHN-BC
P.I. Institution Name:Brigham Young University, College of Nursing
Title:Associate Teaching Professor
Contact Address:428 SWKT, Provo, UT, 84602, USA
Contact Telephone:801-422-7305
Purposes/Aims: The aim of this study was to identify how nursing students learn in clinical settings. Three areas of human learning and development were examined: moral development, cognitive development, and skill acquisition. The specific research question was: How do nursing students describe and interpret clinical experiences that have contributed to their moral, cognitive and skills development? Rationale/Conceptual Basis/Background: Disillusionment and stress are causing a high attrition rate among graduate nurses and are fueling the nursing shortage. These factors combined with the changing health care environment and changing student demographics point out the need for nursing education reform. The challenge to nurse educators is to understand how students progress and change over time in the areas of clinical, cognitive, and moral development. With that understanding, students can be provided with opportunities to gain clinical proficiency that more closely meets their learning needs and styles, preparing them for the challenges of current beginning nursing practice. Methods: This qualitative interpretive phenomenological  study design was informed by Benner, Tanner and Chesla's (1996) studies on expertise in nursing practice. Small group interviews were held consisting of senior nursing students from around the United States. Participants were asked to tell stories about something that happened in their clinical experience that stood out for them because the situation was challenging, or they felt stumped, worried or concerned about what they should do. Transcribed interviews were compared within and across semesters to identify changes that occurred over time. Recurrent themes, paradigm cases and exemplars were examined during data analysis that highlighted students' moral, cognitive and skill development. Results: Although participants changed in the areas of moral, cognitive and skill development as they progressed through nursing school, changes were subtle and students did not all change equally or at the same pace. In moral development, hands-on learning and maintaining relationships with clinical staff were their main concerns, followed by patient wellbeing. Cognitively, participants entered nursing school as dualistic, received knowers and most left as multiplistic, subjective knowers. Finally, they developed skillful practice mainly through repeated experiences in clinicals. Implications: To promote moral, cognitive and skill development in nursing students, nurse educators and clinical staff should maintain positive relationships with students and focus on hands-on learning. The more experience students gain in a safe learning environment, the better prepared they will be to enter beginning practice.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleBecoming a Nurse: Moral, Cognitive and Skills Development in Nursing Studentsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157690-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Becoming a Nurse: Moral, Cognitive and Skills Development in Nursing Students</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Christiaens, Glenda J., PhD, RN, AHN-BC</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Brigham Young University, College of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Teaching Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">428 SWKT, Provo, UT, 84602, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">801-422-7305</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">Glendac@byu.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purposes/Aims: The aim of this study was to identify how nursing students learn in clinical settings. Three areas of human learning and development were examined: moral development, cognitive development, and skill acquisition. The specific research question was: How do nursing students describe and interpret clinical experiences that have contributed to their moral, cognitive and skills development? Rationale/Conceptual Basis/Background: Disillusionment and stress are causing a high attrition rate among graduate nurses and are fueling the nursing shortage. These factors combined with the changing health care environment and changing student demographics point out the need for nursing education reform. The challenge to nurse educators is to understand how students progress and change over time in the areas of clinical, cognitive, and moral development. With that understanding, students can be provided with opportunities to gain clinical proficiency that more closely meets their learning needs and styles, preparing them for the challenges of current beginning nursing practice. Methods: This qualitative interpretive phenomenological &nbsp;study design was informed by Benner, Tanner and Chesla's (1996) studies on expertise in nursing practice. Small group interviews were held consisting of senior nursing students from around the United States. Participants were asked to tell stories about something that happened in their clinical experience that stood out for them because the situation was challenging, or they felt stumped, worried or concerned about what they should do. Transcribed interviews were compared within and across semesters to identify changes that occurred over time. Recurrent themes, paradigm cases and exemplars were examined during data analysis that highlighted students' moral, cognitive and skill development. Results: Although participants changed in the areas of moral, cognitive and skill development as they progressed through nursing school, changes were subtle and students did not all change equally or at the same pace. In moral development, hands-on learning and maintaining relationships with clinical staff were their main concerns, followed by patient wellbeing. Cognitively, participants entered nursing school as dualistic, received knowers and most left as multiplistic, subjective knowers. Finally, they developed skillful practice mainly through repeated experiences in clinicals. Implications: To promote moral, cognitive and skill development in nursing students, nurse educators and clinical staff should maintain positive relationships with students and focus on hands-on learning. The more experience students gain in a safe learning environment, the better prepared they will be to enter beginning practice.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:06:41Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:06:41Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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