2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157694
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Decision-Making Role Preferences Among Family Practice Patients
Abstract:
Decision-Making Role Preferences Among Family Practice Patients
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2009
Author:Clayton, Margaret F., APRN, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Utah, College of Nursing
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:10 South 2000 East, Salt Lake City, UT, 84112, USA
Contact Telephone:801-574-0108
Co-Authors:Sovanny Sanh, BS, Research Analyst; Bob Wong, PhD, Statistician
Purposes/Aims: The primary aim of this study was to assess desired and achieved decision-making role preferences among patients attending two Family Practice clinics.  A secondary aim was to compare these findings to a previous study of decision-making roles among breast cancer survivors attending an oncology practice. Background: Patient decision-making role preferences range from very active to very passive, with most preferring a collaborative middle ground that reflects shared responsibility for decision-making with providers. However, not all patients are able to achieve their desired decision-making role, potentially influencing the patient-provider relationship and ultimately health outcomes. Previous research found that only 48% of breast cancer survivors (N=203) attending an oncology practice (N=6 providers) were able to negotiate their desired role preference when interacting with their providers. The majority of survivors adopted more passive or more active roles than originally desired. However, most research examining decision-making roles has been with cancer and/or end of life samples, less is known about the preferences of primary care patients. Methods: All English speaking adult patients attending two Family Practice clinics over a two month period were recruited. Consenting patients completed questionnaires assessing demographic data, desired and achieved role preference, willingness to communicate, and their perception of the patient-centeredness of their visit. Results: The final sample was composed of 188 patients (age 18-89, 37% male, 63% female) and 21 providers (age 27-55, 40% male, 60% female). Most patients were seeking care for acute illness/symptoms or preventive care. Very few were seeking care for management of chronic diseases. The vast majority of patients (85%, N=161) were able to negotiate their desired decision-making role preference (active, collaborative, or passive). These patients reported on average more role discussions with providers, more encouragement from providers to adopt their chosen decision-making role, and had more years of college than those who were unable to achieve their desired role. Patients who did not achieve their desired role rated their visits as less patient-centered (t 2.22; df 19.06; p .03). Comparing these results to previous research with breast cancer survivors showed that Family Practice patients reported a much greater ability to achieve their desired decision-making role. However, breast cancer survivors who did not achieve their desired role adopted equal rates of increased passive or active decision-making roles in contrast to Family Practice patients who all adopted more passive roles. Implications: Discussion of patient?s preferred decision-making roles is helpful in creating a positive patient perception of the patient-centeredness of their visit, which in turn may impact the patient-provider relationship and ultimately health outcomes such as treatment adherence. Comparing results to previous research suggests that patient decision-making role preferences and the ability to successfully negotiate a desired role may be influenced by the purpose of the visit and the type of medical practice.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDecision-Making Role Preferences Among Family Practice Patientsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157694-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Decision-Making Role Preferences Among Family Practice Patients</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Clayton, Margaret F., APRN, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Utah, College of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">10 South 2000 East, Salt Lake City, UT, 84112, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">801-574-0108</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">margaret.clayton@nurs.utah.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Sovanny Sanh, BS, Research Analyst; Bob Wong, PhD, Statistician</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purposes/Aims: The primary aim of this study was to assess desired and achieved decision-making role preferences among patients attending two Family Practice clinics. &nbsp;A secondary aim was to compare these findings to a previous study of decision-making roles among breast cancer survivors attending an oncology practice. Background: Patient decision-making role preferences range from very active to very passive, with most preferring a collaborative middle ground that reflects shared responsibility for decision-making with providers. However, not all patients are able to achieve their desired decision-making role, potentially influencing the patient-provider relationship and ultimately health outcomes. Previous research found that only 48% of breast cancer survivors (N=203) attending an oncology practice (N=6 providers) were able to negotiate their desired role preference when interacting with their providers. The majority of survivors adopted more passive or more active roles than originally desired. However, most research examining decision-making roles has been with cancer and/or end of life samples, less is known about the preferences of primary care patients. Methods: All English speaking adult patients attending two Family Practice clinics over a two month period were recruited. Consenting patients completed questionnaires assessing demographic data, desired and achieved role preference, willingness to communicate, and their perception of the patient-centeredness of their visit. Results: The final sample was composed of 188 patients (age 18-89, 37% male, 63% female) and 21 providers (age 27-55, 40% male, 60% female). Most patients were seeking care for acute illness/symptoms or preventive care. Very few were seeking care for management of chronic diseases. The vast majority of patients (85%, N=161) were able to negotiate their desired decision-making role preference (active, collaborative, or passive). These patients reported on average more role discussions with providers, more encouragement from providers to adopt their chosen decision-making role, and had more years of college than those who were unable to achieve their desired role. Patients who did not achieve their desired role rated their visits as less patient-centered (t 2.22; df 19.06; p .03). Comparing these results to previous research with breast cancer survivors showed that Family Practice patients reported a much greater ability to achieve their desired decision-making role. However, breast cancer survivors who did not achieve their desired role adopted equal rates of increased passive or active decision-making roles in contrast to Family Practice patients who all adopted more passive roles. Implications: Discussion of patient?s preferred decision-making roles is helpful in creating a positive patient perception of the patient-centeredness of their visit, which in turn may impact the patient-provider relationship and ultimately health outcomes such as treatment adherence. Comparing results to previous research suggests that patient decision-making role preferences and the ability to successfully negotiate a desired role may be influenced by the purpose of the visit and the type of medical practice.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:06:55Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:06:55Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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