Train Wreck: A Community Health Disaster Simulation to Enhance Theoretic Learning

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157697
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Train Wreck: A Community Health Disaster Simulation to Enhance Theoretic Learning
Abstract:
Train Wreck: A Community Health Disaster Simulation to Enhance Theoretic Learning
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2009
Author:Coast, MaryJo, RN, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Regis University, Rueckert-Hartmann College for Health Professions, Loretto Heights School of Nursing
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:3333 Regis Blvd, G-8, Denver, CO, 80221-1099, USA
Contact Telephone:303-964-5341
Co-Authors:Margaret Mulhall, Assistant Professor; Lisa Zenoni, Instructor
Purpose: The purpose of this project was to provide an interactive and experiential simulated learning opportunity to enhance theoretic learning in the area of disaster response for a baccalaureate level community health nursing course. Background: High fidelity simulation has been used for psychomotor learning, skill acquisition and evaluation, as well as clinical acute care learning. It was our desire to utilize this strategy to support theoretic learning with a community health emphasis; targeting the affective and cognitive domains. While evidence shows that lecture strategies are the least effective, these strategies are frequently the modality of choice for teaching the theory portion of nursing knowledge in community health nursing. Disaster education has been identified as a critical component for public health and acute care education. It has become increasingly important to augment the knowledge and synthesis of disaster response education in nursing curriculum; however, the affective and cognitive domains remain largely untapped in current nursing education curricula. Therefore, a need was identified to enhance the experiential learning of our community health students. Description: A mass casualty simulation scenario was created that incorporated the following simulated characters: victims (including typologies such as mental health, triage, homelessness, and human responses to disasters), nurses, public health nurses, and first responders. A combination of high fidelity simulators and nursing students were identified as victims. Students played the other identified parts. Students received directions and basic scripts to facilitate the simulation. Objectives included: 1) to increase understanding of various human responses to disasters, 2) to increase understanding of the collaboration needed among first responders, governmental health agencies, and public health nurses, and 3) to experience disaster triage. Outcomes: During debriefing, students were able to verbalize their observations and experiences about collaboration, human response to disasters, and their roles during the disaster simulation. Additionally, students were able to critically dialogue about the experience of disaster response, professional role identification and responsibility, collaborative issues, community needs, and national response to disasters. Conclusions: As evidenced in debriefing dialogue with students, simulation provided a relevant and experiential learning strategy for affective and cognitive teaching and learning for disaster education for baccalaureate nursing students. Long term assessment of sustained outcomes is critical to the project.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleTrain Wreck: A Community Health Disaster Simulation to Enhance Theoretic Learningen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157697-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Train Wreck: A Community Health Disaster Simulation to Enhance Theoretic Learning</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Coast, MaryJo, RN, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Regis University, Rueckert-Hartmann College for Health Professions, Loretto Heights School of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">3333 Regis Blvd, G-8, Denver, CO, 80221-1099, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">303-964-5341</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">mcoast@regis.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Margaret Mulhall, Assistant Professor; Lisa Zenoni, Instructor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: The purpose of this project was to provide an interactive and experiential simulated learning opportunity to enhance theoretic learning in the area of disaster response for a baccalaureate level community health nursing course. Background: High fidelity simulation has been used for psychomotor learning, skill acquisition and evaluation, as well as clinical acute care learning. It was our desire to utilize this strategy to support theoretic learning with a community health emphasis; targeting the affective and cognitive domains. While evidence shows that lecture strategies are the least effective, these strategies are frequently the modality of choice for teaching the theory portion of nursing knowledge in community health nursing. Disaster education has been identified as a critical component for public health and acute care education. It has become increasingly important to augment the knowledge and synthesis of disaster response education in nursing curriculum; however, the affective and cognitive domains remain largely untapped in current nursing education curricula. Therefore, a need was identified to enhance the experiential learning of our community health students. Description: A mass casualty simulation scenario was created that incorporated the following simulated characters: victims (including typologies such as mental health, triage, homelessness, and human responses to disasters), nurses, public health nurses, and first responders. A combination of high fidelity simulators and nursing students were identified as victims. Students played the other identified parts. Students received directions and basic scripts to facilitate the simulation. Objectives included: 1) to increase understanding of various human responses to disasters, 2) to increase understanding of the collaboration needed among first responders, governmental health agencies, and public health nurses, and 3) to experience disaster triage. Outcomes: During debriefing, students were able to verbalize their observations and experiences about collaboration, human response to disasters, and their roles during the disaster simulation. Additionally, students were able to critically dialogue about the experience of disaster response, professional role identification and responsibility, collaborative issues, community needs, and national response to disasters. Conclusions: As evidenced in debriefing dialogue with students, simulation provided a relevant and experiential learning strategy for affective and cognitive teaching and learning for disaster education for baccalaureate nursing students. Long term assessment of sustained outcomes is critical to the project.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:07:06Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:07:06Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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