2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157698
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Letting Own Agenda Go
Abstract:
Letting Own Agenda Go
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2009
Author:Colclough, Yoshiko Y., Ph.D., R.N.
P.I. Institution Name:Montana State University, College of Nursing
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:PO Box 173560, Bozeman, MT, 59717-3560, USA
Contact Telephone:406-994-6048
Purpose: To describe lessons learned by the academic researcher while establishing a community and academic partnership to develop a culturally appropriate tribal palliative care intervention for an American-Indian nation. Background: Hospice care is a gold standard for those who pursue quality of life rather than aggressive treatments for cure when such treatments become less beneficial or burdensome. Unfortunately, availability of formal palliative care services is very limited for American Indians/Alaska Natives residing in rural areas and on reservations. The disparities in access to health care and the health care delivery system demonstrates difficulties for the American Indians/Alaska Natives to deal with. Through the Montana Consortium for Community-Based Research in Health, the partnership between the tribe and the academic was initiated to develop a culturally appropriate tribal palliative care intervention. However, exercising a Community Based Participatory Research (CBRP) approach was fun as well as challenging. Unfortunately, only a few references were found that describe practical strategies to overcome the intense challenges that are involved with differing perspectives amongst interdisciplinary team members. Approach: The main data source is the field notes that were taken during the meetings and personal visits since the partnership has started in March of 2007. Ten field notes were shared as meeting summaries with the tribal members. This analysis focused only on the academic's actions and thoughts. First, descriptive aspects of the field notes were analyzed and categorized. Second, reflective aspects of the academic?s frames of minds were focused on the analysis. Outcomes achieved: Three themes were identified from the descriptive aspects of the field notes. They were Tremendous Preparation, Personal Visits, and Distance. The academic prepared for most of the meetings, led the research process, and made efforts to meet tribal people. At the same time, the long distance between the tribe and the academic prevented her from knowing what was going on in the tribe. The reflective aspects of the analysis included Anxiety, Doubt about Exploitation, and Paternalism. Anxiety occupied during initial introduction to the tribal members and planning each meeting. Doubt about Exploitation meant to describe the academic's heightened sensitivity related to a direction of the research process and the CBPR approach. In particular, viewing the partnership from both perspectives was conducive to deal with the doubts and to break the traditional research approach. The academic was able to change a chronological (linear) order of research process (from a community assessment to a community awareness intervention) to a concurrent order (assessment and intervention simultaneously) to benefit both partners. Paternalism was an overarching attitude of the academic that was composed of three sub-aspects: members? priority, their responsibility, and scarce manpower. Conclusions: After establishing the partnership, the team produced four presentations, two community awareness projects, and three grant proposal submissions. Despite numerous outcomes from the partnership and tremendous community involvement in the research process, the partnership development was a rather tortured psychological effort for the academic with always questioning "Are we doing a CBPR approach?" Four recommendations include: reflect on own commitment level, be persistent, trust your partner community, and create regular dialogue with the members of the partnership.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleLetting Own Agenda Goen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157698-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Letting Own Agenda Go</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Colclough, Yoshiko Y., Ph.D., R.N.</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Montana State University, College of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">PO Box 173560, Bozeman, MT, 59717-3560, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">406-994-6048</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">yoshikoc@montana.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: To describe lessons learned by the academic researcher while establishing a community and academic partnership to develop a culturally appropriate tribal palliative care intervention for an American-Indian nation. Background: Hospice care is a gold standard for those who pursue quality of life rather than aggressive treatments for cure when such treatments become less beneficial or burdensome. Unfortunately, availability of formal palliative care services is very limited for American Indians/Alaska Natives residing in rural areas and on reservations. The disparities in access to health care and the health care delivery system demonstrates difficulties for the American Indians/Alaska Natives to deal with. Through the Montana Consortium for Community-Based Research in Health, the partnership between the tribe and the academic was initiated to develop a culturally appropriate tribal palliative care intervention. However, exercising a Community Based Participatory Research (CBRP) approach was fun as well as challenging. Unfortunately, only a few references were found that describe practical strategies to overcome the intense challenges that are involved with differing perspectives amongst interdisciplinary team members. Approach: The main data source is the field notes that were taken during the meetings and personal visits since the partnership has started in March of 2007. Ten field notes were shared as meeting summaries with the tribal members. This analysis focused only on the academic's actions and thoughts. First, descriptive aspects of the field notes were analyzed and categorized. Second, reflective aspects of the academic?s frames of minds were focused on the analysis. Outcomes achieved: Three themes were identified from the descriptive aspects of the field notes. They were Tremendous Preparation, Personal Visits, and Distance. The academic prepared for most of the meetings, led the research process, and made efforts to meet tribal people. At the same time, the long distance between the tribe and the academic prevented her from knowing what was going on in the tribe. The reflective aspects of the analysis included Anxiety, Doubt about Exploitation, and Paternalism. Anxiety occupied during initial introduction to the tribal members and planning each meeting. Doubt about Exploitation meant to describe the academic's heightened sensitivity related to a direction of the research process and the CBPR approach. In particular, viewing the partnership from both perspectives was conducive to deal with the doubts and to break the traditional research approach. The academic was able to change a chronological (linear) order of research process (from a community assessment to a community awareness intervention) to a concurrent order (assessment and intervention simultaneously) to benefit both partners. Paternalism was an overarching attitude of the academic that was composed of three sub-aspects: members? priority, their responsibility, and scarce manpower. Conclusions: After establishing the partnership, the team produced four presentations, two community awareness projects, and three grant proposal submissions. Despite numerous outcomes from the partnership and tremendous community involvement in the research process, the partnership development was a rather tortured psychological effort for the academic with always questioning &quot;Are we doing a CBPR approach?&quot; Four recommendations include: reflect on own commitment level, be persistent, trust your partner community, and create regular dialogue with the members of the partnership.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:07:10Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:07:10Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.