2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157699
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Improving the Occupational Health and Sleep Quality of Night Shift Workers
Abstract:
Improving the Occupational Health and Sleep Quality of Night Shift Workers
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2009
Author:Collette-Merrill, Katreena, RN, BSN, Candidate, for, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Intermountain Healthcare Urban South Region, Nursing
Title:Nursing Practice and Research Coordinator
Contact Address:1034 North 500 West, Provo, UT, 84064, USA
Contact Telephone:801-357-7910
Co-Authors:Angie Kahoush, Nurse Educator; Jeanette Faulk, RN, MSN, CCRN; Barbara Heise, PhD, APRN, BC, Asst. Professor; Christie Johnson, RN, MSN, CNOR, Nurse Residency Coordinator; Karl Ludwig, Respiratory Therapy Quality Consultant; Dennis Minch, ER Staff Nurse
Purposes/Aims:  The purpose of the study is to determine if teaching night shift workers at Utah Valley Regional Medical Center about coping mechanisms to aid their sleep will improve their occupational health and self perception of quality of sleep. Hypothesis: We hypothesize that night shift workers will report better occupational health and sleep quality following teaching them sleep coping mechanisms. Rationale/Background: The hospital operates on a 24/7 basis.  This requires workers to work shifts.  Shift work is defined as work hours that are scheduled outside of daylight hours.  Working during the night time hours results in altered circadian rhythm and alters daily routines and influences physical and mental health. In addition, difficulty falling asleep and obtaining quality sleep during the day is a common problem of shift workers.  Lifestyle training teaches night-shift workers coping strategies to improve their reactions to the night shift.  Recommendations for night shift workers include sleep breaks, bright lighting, temperature, nutrition, shift rotation and overtime.  However, these approaches have not been well studied and need to be more thoroughly investigated to determine their effectiveness on night shift staff. Description: The research will take place at 395 bed tertiary care hospital in the Intermountain West.  Subjects will be included in the study if they are employed at least 24 hours a week during the hours of 6:00 p.m. and 6:00 a.m. The design will be a repeated measures (Pre-test, Post-test) with an intervention.  The subjects will complete a baseline on-line survey of their sleep quality and occupational fatigue in December 2008 followed by an educational intervention in January 2009.  Following the baseline and intervention, the subjects will complete an evaluation in March 2009.  The sample size will be approximately 1000 subjects. It is expected that at least 50% of those who are eligible for the study will complete the survey (500 subjects). Instruments: The Pittsburg Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) will be used to assess the subjects perception of their sleep. This 19 tool has internal consistency and a reliability coefficient (Cronbach's alpha) of 0.83 for its seven components.  The Occupational Fatigue Exhaustion Recover Scale (OFER) will be used to measure  work-related fatigue and recovery.  The OFER is a 15 item scale with 3 subscales:  chronic fatigue, acute fatigue and intershift recovery.  Each of the questions is rated on a Likert scale from 0-6.  The OFER instrument was developed following a pilot study of 247 female nurses and 232 male quarry workers.  The tool was validated with 770 nurses using factor analysis.  The subscales have high internal reliability (>0.84), face, construct and discriminant validity.  Structural Equation Modeling analysis confirmed the role of recovery in mediating the relationship between acute and chronic fatigue measured with the OFER. Proposed Data Collection/Analysis: The data will be collected online using an electronic survey.  The results will be downloaded into a statistical software program (i.e. SPSS).  Descriptive statistics will be done on the demographic data collected (age, gender, unit worked, job category).  A repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) will be used to detect differences in the pre-test and post-test groups in relation to their overall PSQI and the three subscales of the OFER.  The significance level will be set at .01 to correct for multiple tests.  Pearson correlations will be used to compare demographic information with PSQI and OFER subscales. Results/Conclusions:  The proposed research was approved by the IRB in October 2008. The results of this research will provide needed research on the effects of education and training of night shift workers in sleep and fatigue management.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleImproving the Occupational Health and Sleep Quality of Night Shift Workersen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157699-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Improving the Occupational Health and Sleep Quality of Night Shift Workers</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Collette-Merrill, Katreena, RN, BSN, Candidate, for, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Intermountain Healthcare Urban South Region, Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Nursing Practice and Research Coordinator</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">1034 North 500 West, Provo, UT, 84064, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">801-357-7910</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">katreena.merrill@imail.org</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Angie Kahoush, Nurse Educator; Jeanette Faulk, RN, MSN, CCRN; Barbara Heise, PhD, APRN, BC, Asst. Professor; Christie Johnson, RN, MSN, CNOR, Nurse Residency Coordinator; Karl Ludwig, Respiratory Therapy Quality Consultant; Dennis Minch, ER Staff Nurse</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purposes/Aims:&nbsp; The purpose of the study is to determine if teaching night shift workers at Utah Valley Regional Medical Center about coping mechanisms to aid their sleep will improve their occupational health and self perception of quality of sleep. Hypothesis: We hypothesize that night shift workers will report better occupational health and sleep quality following teaching them sleep coping mechanisms. Rationale/Background: The hospital operates on a 24/7 basis.&nbsp; This requires workers to work shifts.&nbsp; Shift work is defined as work hours that are scheduled outside of daylight hours.&nbsp; Working during the night time hours results in altered circadian rhythm and alters daily routines and influences physical and mental health. In addition, difficulty falling asleep and obtaining quality sleep during the day is a common problem of shift workers. &nbsp;Lifestyle training teaches night-shift workers coping strategies to improve their reactions to the night shift.&nbsp; Recommendations for night shift workers include sleep breaks, bright lighting, temperature, nutrition, shift rotation and overtime.&nbsp; However, these approaches have not been well studied and need to be more thoroughly investigated to determine their effectiveness on night shift staff. Description: The research will take place at 395 bed tertiary care hospital in the Intermountain West.&nbsp; Subjects will be included in the study if they are employed at least 24 hours a week during the hours of 6:00 p.m. and 6:00 a.m. The design will be a repeated measures (Pre-test, Post-test) with an intervention.&nbsp; The subjects will complete a baseline on-line survey of their sleep quality and occupational fatigue in December 2008 followed by an educational intervention in January 2009.&nbsp; Following the baseline and intervention, the subjects will complete an evaluation in March 2009.&nbsp; The sample size will be approximately 1000 subjects. It is expected that at least 50% of those who are eligible for the study will complete the survey (500 subjects).&nbsp;Instruments: The Pittsburg Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) will be used to assess the subjects perception of their sleep. This 19 tool has internal consistency and a reliability coefficient (Cronbach's alpha) of 0.83 for its seven components.&nbsp; The Occupational Fatigue Exhaustion Recover Scale (OFER) will be used to measure&nbsp; work-related fatigue and recovery.&nbsp; The OFER is a 15 item scale with 3 subscales:&nbsp; chronic fatigue, acute fatigue and intershift recovery.&nbsp; Each of the questions is rated on a Likert scale from 0-6.&nbsp; The OFER instrument was developed following a pilot study of 247 female nurses and 232 male quarry workers.&nbsp; The tool was validated with 770 nurses using factor analysis.&nbsp; The subscales have high internal reliability (&gt;0.84), face, construct and discriminant validity.&nbsp; Structural Equation Modeling analysis confirmed the role of recovery in mediating the relationship between acute and chronic fatigue measured with the OFER.&nbsp;Proposed Data Collection/Analysis: The data will be collected online using an electronic survey.&nbsp; The results will be downloaded into a statistical software program (i.e. SPSS).&nbsp; Descriptive statistics will be done on the demographic data collected (age, gender, unit worked, job category).&nbsp; A repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) will be used to detect differences in the pre-test and post-test groups in relation to their overall PSQI and the three subscales of the OFER.&nbsp; The significance level will be set at .01 to correct for multiple tests. &nbsp;Pearson correlations will be used to compare demographic information with PSQI and OFER subscales. Results/Conclusions:&nbsp; The proposed research was approved by the IRB in October 2008.&nbsp;The results of this research will provide needed research on the effects of education and training of night shift workers in sleep and fatigue management.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:07:13Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:07:13Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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