2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157701
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Relationship of Mothers With Asthma and Children Scores on ASF
Abstract:
Relationship of Mothers With Asthma and Children Scores on ASF
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2009
Author:Cook, Susanne W., RN, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:ASU, College of Nursing and Healthcare Innovation
Title:Asst. Professor
Contact Address:500 East 3rd Street, Phoenix, AZ, 85004, USA
Contact Telephone:480-201-1498
Co-Authors:Judy Harris, RN, MS, CPNP, Director of Breathmobile Project; Karen H. Sousa, RN, PhD, Professor
Purpose: The purpose was to examine the relationship between reported diagnoses of asthma in mothers and reports of asthma-like symptoms in children. The forms were completed by parents/ caregivers of head start and elementary age children as part of a community asthma case detection effort. Rationale: Asthma prevalence and diagnosis has received much attention in practice. School-based asthma case detection is a methodology to facilitate early identification, diagnosis and treatment to avoid life-threatening exacerbations and possible permanent airway changes. The Asthma Screening Form (ASF) was completed by parents/caregivers of children. ASF has 9-items measuring 2 dimensions (symptoms/ morbidity). The symptom dimension has 5 items related to frequency of respiratory symptoms. Items ask parents/caregivers to recall/ report children's frequency (cough, wheeze, or shortness of breath) during past year (severe or repeated episodes; night-time occurrences; activity limitations at home; activity limitations at school or during sports; and trigger exposures). A 5-point scale is used for reporting answers. The scale varies between zero (0) (never experienced symptoms) to four (4) (experienced symptoms > 2x a week). The morbidity dimension was not used in these analyses. Mothers with asthma were identified by:  Has the mother of the child ever been told she has asthma? (Yes or No). Methods: Cross sectional analyses were performed of all children in sample with all mothers with diagnoses of asthma. The sample consisted of 2781 children, 1380 (49.6%) were females and 1401 (50.3%) were male. No significant difference between gender by group (X2=2.5668, p=0.1091) was found.  Forms were completed by parents/ caregivers in English- (n=1184, 37.23%) and Spanish-primary language (n=1591, 49.44%) with no significant difference by group (X2=0.4382, (p= 0.4382).  T-Test procedures were used to examine difference in age by group.  Mean age for all children 3.75/ median 4 yrs. There was no significant difference in age by groups (p<.0001). Results: The mean symptom scores for children who had mothers with a history of a diagnosis of asthma (N=351) (M=3.997, p=<.0001) were significantly higher than for children whose mother did not have a diagnosis of asthma (M=1.551, p=<.0001).  The significance continued when the analyses controlled for age by dividing the groups into head start (M= 3.285, p=<.0001) and elementary school (M= 3.497, p=<.0001) groups. Implications: A symptom score of > 3 in children without a diagnosis of asthma is currently used to facilitate early identification, diagnosis and treatment of possible asthma.  When significant relationships between scores >3 and mothers positive histories of asthma exist, it raises questions as to what phenomenon is occurring? Perhaps scores > 3 are due to increased sensitivity to the symptom questions?  Or perhaps, the child is exhibiting symptoms which the mother perceives as 'normal'? Further investigation is needed on the population and the instrument to seek an explanation.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleRelationship of Mothers With Asthma and Children Scores on ASFen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157701-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Relationship of Mothers With Asthma and Children Scores on ASF</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Cook, Susanne W., RN, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">ASU, College of Nursing and Healthcare Innovation</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Asst. Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">500 East 3rd Street, Phoenix, AZ, 85004, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">480-201-1498</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">susanne.cook@asu.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Judy Harris, RN, MS, CPNP, Director of Breathmobile Project; Karen H. Sousa, RN, PhD, Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: The purpose was to examine the relationship between reported diagnoses of asthma in mothers and reports of asthma-like symptoms in children. The forms were completed by parents/ caregivers of head start and elementary age children as part of a community asthma case detection effort. Rationale: Asthma prevalence and diagnosis has received much attention in practice. School-based asthma case detection is a methodology to facilitate early identification, diagnosis and treatment to avoid life-threatening exacerbations and possible permanent airway changes. The Asthma Screening Form (ASF) was completed by parents/caregivers of children. ASF has 9-items measuring 2 dimensions (symptoms/ morbidity). The symptom dimension has 5 items related to frequency of respiratory symptoms. Items ask parents/caregivers to recall/ report children's frequency (cough, wheeze, or shortness of breath) during past year (severe or repeated episodes; night-time occurrences; activity limitations at home; activity limitations at school or during sports; and trigger exposures). A 5-point scale is used for reporting answers. The scale varies between zero (0) (never experienced symptoms) to four (4) (experienced symptoms &gt; 2x a week). The morbidity dimension was not used in these analyses. Mothers with asthma were identified by:&nbsp; Has the mother of the child ever been told she has asthma? (Yes or No). Methods: Cross sectional analyses were performed of all children in sample with all mothers with diagnoses of asthma. The sample consisted of 2781 children, 1380 (49.6%) were females and 1401 (50.3%) were male. No significant difference between gender by group (X2=2.5668, p=0.1091) was found.&nbsp; Forms were completed by parents/ caregivers in English- (n=1184, 37.23%) and Spanish-primary language (n=1591, 49.44%) with no significant difference by group (X2=0.4382, (p= 0.4382).&nbsp; T-Test procedures were used to examine difference in age by group.&nbsp; Mean age for all children 3.75/ median 4 yrs. There was no significant difference in age by groups (p&lt;.0001). Results: The mean symptom scores for children who had mothers with a history of a diagnosis of asthma (N=351) (M=3.997, p=&lt;.0001) were significantly higher than for children whose mother did not have a diagnosis of asthma (M=1.551, p=&lt;.0001).&nbsp; The significance continued when the analyses controlled for age by dividing the groups into head start (M= 3.285, p=&lt;.0001) and elementary school (M= 3.497, p=&lt;.0001) groups.&nbsp;Implications: A symptom score of &gt; 3 in children without a diagnosis of asthma is currently used to facilitate early identification, diagnosis and treatment of possible asthma.&nbsp; When significant relationships between scores &gt;3 and mothers positive histories of asthma exist, it raises questions as to what phenomenon is occurring? Perhaps scores &gt; 3 are due to increased sensitivity to the symptom questions?&nbsp; Or perhaps, the child is exhibiting symptoms which the mother perceives as 'normal'? Further investigation is needed on the population and the instrument to seek an explanation.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:07:20Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:07:20Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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