The Spiritual Dimension Within Nursing Curricula of Baccalaureate Nursing Programs

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157705
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Spiritual Dimension Within Nursing Curricula of Baccalaureate Nursing Programs
Abstract:
The Spiritual Dimension Within Nursing Curricula of Baccalaureate Nursing Programs
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2009
Author:Crewell, Judy, PhD, RN, CNE
P.I. Institution Name:Regis University, Loretto Heights School of Nursing
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:3333 Regis Blvd G-8, Denver, CO, 80221, USA
Contact Telephone:303-596-8343
Purpose/Aims:  The purpose of this study was to analyze the spiritual dimension in the nursing curricula of baccalaureate nursing programs to better understand educational practices and the experiences of nursing faculty in teaching spiritual care. Rationale/Conceptual Basis/Background: Trends in nursing include an increased awareness of the importance of spirituality and spiritual care in the care of patients and families; and the role of the nurse in providing spiritual care. Spiritual care has been identified as a component of holistic nursing care by professional organizations and accrediting agencies (American Association of Colleges of Nursing, 1998; Joint Commission on Accreditation Healthcare Organizations, 2004). Research reveals that health care professionals do not feel prepared to provide spiritual care. One identified missing link is within nursing education and the lack of, or inconsistency of spiritual care content in the nursing curriculum, and faculty who do not feel comfortable in teaching spiritual care. Studies have demonstrated the relationship between increased practices of spiritual care with preparation in spiritual care education. Methods: A quantitative, non-experimental, two-group comparison survey design was conducted to investigate the spiritual dimension in the nursing curriculum including spiritual care content, educational pedagogies and instructional methods and faculty attitudes in the NLN Centers of Excellence and matched baccalaureate nursing programs. Results: Utilizing a two-way MANOVA, no difference was found between the NLN Centers of  Excellence and the matched baccalaureate nursing programs regarding the spiritual dimension in the nursing curricula. The findings revealed both groups were in agreement that spiritual care is a significant part of nursing care. Spiritual care concepts were reported to be integrated throughout the curriculum but the actual time devoted to spiritual care content ranged widely. The majority reported a lack of definitions of spirituality and spiritual nursing care. There was uncertainty as to whether faculty possess the necessary time, knowledge, and comfort level to teach spiritual care concepts. Implications: The study results revealed the need for further research to explore the concepts and practices of spirituality and spiritual care to contribute to the body of knowledge in nursing science and to establish evidence based spiritual care nursing practice. Recommendations included the need to determine the presence, quantity and quality of spiritual care education and to evaluate the relationship of spiritual care education and the application of spiritual care in the clinical practice of student nurses and registered nurses. Further research will contribute to the identification of content and of best practices for faculty in providing consistent spiritual care education for nursing students to help meet the spiritual needs of patients and to meet the dictates of professional standards of nursing practice.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Spiritual Dimension Within Nursing Curricula of Baccalaureate Nursing Programsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157705-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Spiritual Dimension Within Nursing Curricula of Baccalaureate Nursing Programs</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Crewell, Judy, PhD, RN, CNE</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Regis University, Loretto Heights School of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">3333 Regis Blvd G-8, Denver, CO, 80221, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">303-596-8343</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">jcrewell@regis.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose/Aims:&nbsp; The purpose of this study was to analyze the spiritual dimension in the nursing curricula of baccalaureate nursing programs to better understand educational practices and the experiences of nursing faculty in teaching spiritual care. Rationale/Conceptual Basis/Background: Trends in nursing include an increased awareness of the importance of spirituality and spiritual care in the care of patients and families; and the role of the nurse in providing spiritual care. Spiritual care has been identified as a component of holistic nursing care by professional organizations and accrediting agencies (American Association of Colleges of Nursing, 1998; Joint Commission on Accreditation Healthcare Organizations, 2004). Research reveals that health care professionals do not feel prepared to provide spiritual care. One identified missing link is within nursing education and the lack of, or inconsistency of spiritual care content in the nursing curriculum, and faculty who do not feel comfortable in teaching spiritual care. Studies have demonstrated the relationship between increased practices of spiritual care with preparation in spiritual care education. Methods: A quantitative, non-experimental, two-group comparison survey design was conducted to investigate the spiritual dimension in the nursing curriculum including spiritual care content, educational pedagogies and instructional methods and faculty attitudes in the NLN Centers of Excellence and matched baccalaureate nursing programs. Results: Utilizing a two-way MANOVA, no difference was found between the NLN Centers of &nbsp;Excellence and the matched baccalaureate nursing programs regarding the spiritual dimension in the nursing curricula. The findings revealed both groups were in agreement that spiritual care is a significant part of nursing care. Spiritual care concepts were reported to be integrated throughout the curriculum but the actual time devoted to spiritual care content ranged widely. The majority reported a lack of definitions of spirituality and spiritual nursing care. There was uncertainty as to whether faculty possess the necessary time, knowledge, and comfort level to teach spiritual care concepts. Implications: The study results revealed the need for further research to explore the concepts and practices of spirituality and spiritual care to contribute to the body of knowledge in nursing science and to establish evidence based spiritual care nursing practice. Recommendations included the need to determine the presence, quantity and quality of spiritual care education and to evaluate the relationship of spiritual care education and the application of spiritual care in the clinical practice of student nurses and registered nurses. Further research will contribute to the identification of content and of best practices for faculty in providing consistent spiritual care education for nursing students to help meet the spiritual needs of patients and to meet the dictates of professional standards of nursing practice.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:07:33Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:07:33Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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