Cross-Cultural Caregiving Research: Update on Familism in Latino and Anglo Cultures

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157706
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Cross-Cultural Caregiving Research: Update on Familism in Latino and Anglo Cultures
Abstract:
Cross-Cultural Caregiving Research: Update on Familism in Latino and Anglo Cultures
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2009
Author:Crist, Janice D., PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Arizona, College of Nursing
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:1305 N. Martin Street, Tucson, AZ, 85721, USA
Contact Telephone:520-626-8768
Co-Authors:Socorro Escandon, PhD, RN, Assistant Professor
Purpose/Aims: To review the literature regarding how familism affects caregiving decisions, and to compare and contrast caregiving within two exemplar cultures: traditionally collectivist Latino and individualistic Anglo cultures. Background/Rationale: Familism consists of two basic notions, relating to boundaries, or who and who does not belong to the family; and to proximity, or the acceptability of how close or how far to live from the family. Latino elders and caregivers make decisions together; for example, whether to use home care services. Latino elders use home care services less frequently compared to Anglo elders, even though functional problems are more prevalent in Latino elders at earlier ages. Familism was recently shown to be a significant predictor of use of home care services by Latino elders. The literature and clinical experience also support the possibility that familism is a predictor for other cultures as well. Cross-cultural research is needed to bring a broader understanding to underpin future culturally relevant nursing interventions, beginning with a critical review of the family caregiving literature for both cultures. Methods: Methods included an extensive and critical literature search of articles found through four databases. Key words were familism, familismo, filial obligation, family caregiving, Mexican, Mexican American, Latino, Hispanic, non-Hispanic white, Anglo, Caucasian, and other controlled vocabulary terms. From the databases we found 102 articles, and reviewed additional articles of which we were aware, totaling 134, dated from 1945 to 2009. The poster reports concepts, theories, instruments, and innovative applications, identifying gaps, and invites collaboration on future research. Results: Early social science literature reported that allocentric Latino families were more family oriented than egocentric Anglo families; that familism was the strongest characteristic of Latino culture, even at differing levels of acculturation; differences were related to filial obligation vs. affection; and Anglo attitudes were related to issues of autonomy. However, recent literature reported that the Latino extended family has been disappearing due to societal influences, with the extended family no longer central to the routines of everyday life: a fundamental revision of what "family" means. Family caregiving among Latino families is growing increasingly difficult due to this shift of cultural values. Also, Latino and Anglo caregivers did not differ in social support. Implications: Definitions of this construct relate to levels of attachment and identification of individuals to their nuclear and extended families, with feelings of loyalty, solidarity, and reciprocity. These attitudes toward family are known to influence the tendency of family members to care for elderly relatives. Studying the construct of familism in two cultures that differ in basic paradigms facilitates a closer look at the manifestation of this phenomenon to shape more culturally appropriate nursing practice. Familism scales have been formulated as early as 1959 but measure values in a broad and general sense and are not sufficiently specific for assessing caregiving families. Future measures, practice, and interventions need to be shaped by updated cross-cultural definitions and understanding. Funding: National Institute of Nursing Research, 1 R15 NR009031-01, UA; Health Sciences Center Research Allocation Committee, Nursing/Pharmacy/Allied Health, UNM.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCross-Cultural Caregiving Research: Update on Familism in Latino and Anglo Culturesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157706-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Cross-Cultural Caregiving Research: Update on Familism in Latino and Anglo Cultures</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Crist, Janice D., PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Arizona, College of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">1305 N. Martin Street, Tucson, AZ, 85721, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">520-626-8768</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">jcrist@nursing.arizona.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Socorro Escandon, PhD, RN, Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose/Aims: To review the literature regarding how familism affects caregiving decisions, and to compare and contrast caregiving within two exemplar cultures: traditionally collectivist Latino and individualistic Anglo cultures. Background/Rationale: Familism consists of two basic notions, relating to boundaries, or who and who does not belong to the family; and to proximity, or the acceptability of how close or how far to live from the family. Latino elders and caregivers make decisions together; for example, whether to use home care services. Latino elders use home care services less frequently compared to Anglo elders, even though functional problems are more prevalent in Latino elders at earlier ages. Familism was recently shown to be a significant predictor of use of home care services by Latino elders. The literature and clinical experience also support the possibility that familism is a predictor for other cultures as well. Cross-cultural research is needed to bring a broader understanding to underpin future culturally relevant nursing interventions, beginning with a critical review of the family caregiving literature for both cultures. Methods: Methods included an extensive and critical literature search of articles found through four databases. Key words were familism, familismo, filial obligation, family caregiving, Mexican, Mexican American, Latino, Hispanic, non-Hispanic white, Anglo, Caucasian, and other controlled vocabulary terms. From the databases we found 102 articles, and reviewed additional articles of which we were aware, totaling 134, dated from 1945 to 2009. The poster reports concepts, theories, instruments, and innovative applications, identifying gaps, and invites collaboration on future research. Results: Early social science literature reported that allocentric Latino families were more family oriented than egocentric Anglo families; that familism was the strongest characteristic of Latino culture, even at differing levels of acculturation; differences were related to filial obligation vs. affection; and Anglo attitudes were related to issues of autonomy. However, recent literature reported that the Latino extended family has been disappearing due to societal influences, with the extended family no longer central to the routines of everyday life: a fundamental revision of what &quot;family&quot; means. Family caregiving among Latino families is growing increasingly difficult due to this shift of cultural values. Also, Latino and Anglo caregivers did not differ in social support. Implications: Definitions of this construct relate to levels of attachment and identification of individuals to their nuclear and extended families, with feelings of loyalty, solidarity, and reciprocity. These attitudes toward family are known to influence the tendency of family members to care for elderly relatives. Studying the construct of familism in two cultures that differ in basic paradigms facilitates a closer look at the manifestation of this phenomenon to shape more culturally appropriate nursing practice. Familism scales have been formulated as early as 1959 but measure values in a broad and general sense and are not sufficiently specific for assessing caregiving families. Future measures, practice, and interventions need to be shaped by updated cross-cultural definitions and understanding. Funding: National Institute of Nursing Research, 1 R15 NR009031-01, UA; Health Sciences Center Research Allocation Committee, Nursing/Pharmacy/Allied Health, UNM.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:07:37Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:07:37Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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