2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157707
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Women to Women: Onward and Upward
Abstract:
Women to Women: Onward and Upward
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2009
Author:Cudney, Shirley, MA, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Montana State University, College of Nursing
Title:Associate Professor (Retired)
Contact Address:PO Box 173560, Bozeman, MT, 59717-3560, USA
Contact Telephone:406-994-2782
Co-Authors:Clarann Weinert, SC, PhD, RN, FAAN, Professor
Purpose:  To describe the evolution of the SEQ CHAPTER \h \r 1Women to Women (WTW) computer support and education project from an intervention that was complex and labor intensive into one that is less complex, more user-friendly, and clinically applicable. SEQ CHAPTER \h \r 1 Background: SEQ CHAPTER \h \r 1The Women to Women Project (WTW), a computer-based research intervention designed to provide support and health information to rural women living with a long-term illness, has been on-going in the western for over 12 years. The overall goal of the project is to test the impact of a computer-based intervention on psychosocial adaptation, chronic illness self-management, and quality of life among rural women with chronic illness. The evolution of through three phases has led to the refinement and enrichment of a model of psychosocial adaptation that aims for more sustained behavior change in the management of chronic illness and improved quality of life based on the adaptation. Description: The current phase of the project is an outgrowth of the earlier phases of WTW.  The revision now being implemented  includes:  reducing the complexity of the design by using two groups rather than three-groups with periodic rather than sustained interface with content experts; shortening the intervention from 22 to 11 weeks with 3 measurement time points rather than 6; combining two interactive online forums (Koffee Klatch and Health Roundtable) into one (Sharing Circle); focusing the health teaching unit content toward the self-management skills needed to deal with chronic illness rather than on factual chronic illness content; adding three more states (Nebraska, Oregon, and Washington) to the participant pool; and further development of a model of psychosocial adaptation to chronic illness. Outcomes: The redesigned, less complex, more abbreviated intervention has been funded and is currently in progress. Over half of the data have been collected from the projected 320 chronically ill rural women in eight western states. Conclusions: This research continues to document the applicability and efficacy of computer-based support and health education on psychosocial outcomes, self-management skills, and quality of life. The less complex application can move technological interventions closer to implementation in the clinical setting. Computer-based interventions have the potential of reducing the health care delivery disparities for rural dwellers.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleWomen to Women: Onward and Upwarden_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157707-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Women to Women: Onward and Upward</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Cudney, Shirley, MA, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Montana State University, College of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor (Retired)</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">PO Box 173560, Bozeman, MT, 59717-3560, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">406-994-2782</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">scudney@montana.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Clarann Weinert, SC, PhD, RN, FAAN, Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose:&nbsp; To describe the evolution of the SEQ CHAPTER \h \r 1Women to Women (WTW) computer support and education project from an intervention that was complex and labor intensive into one that is less complex, more user-friendly, and clinically applicable.&nbsp;SEQ CHAPTER \h \r 1 Background: SEQ CHAPTER \h \r 1The Women to Women Project (WTW), a computer-based research intervention designed to provide support and health information to rural women living with a long-term illness, has been on-going in the western for over 12 years. The overall goal of the project is to test the impact of a computer-based intervention on psychosocial adaptation, chronic illness self-management, and quality of life among rural women with chronic illness. The evolution of through three phases has led to the refinement and enrichment of a model of psychosocial adaptation that aims for more sustained behavior change in the management of chronic illness and improved quality of life based on the adaptation.&nbsp;Description: The current phase of the project is an outgrowth of the earlier phases of WTW.&nbsp; The revision now being implemented&nbsp; includes:&nbsp; reducing the complexity of the design by using two groups rather than three-groups with periodic rather than sustained interface with content experts; shortening the intervention from 22 to 11 weeks with 3 measurement time points rather than 6; combining two interactive online forums (Koffee Klatch and Health Roundtable) into one (Sharing Circle); focusing the health teaching unit content toward the self-management skills needed to deal with chronic illness rather than on factual chronic illness content; adding three more states (Nebraska, Oregon, and Washington) to the participant pool; and further development of a model of psychosocial adaptation to chronic illness.&nbsp;Outcomes: The redesigned, less complex, more abbreviated intervention has been funded and is currently in progress.&nbsp;Over half of the data have been collected from the projected 320 chronically ill rural women in eight western states. Conclusions: This research continues to document the applicability and efficacy of computer-based support and health education on psychosocial outcomes, self-management skills, and quality of life. The less complex application can move technological interventions closer to implementation in the clinical setting. Computer-based interventions have the potential of reducing the health care delivery disparities for rural dwellers.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:07:40Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:07:40Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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