2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157708
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Factors Affecting Decision to Work During a Natural Disaster
Abstract:
Factors Affecting Decision to Work During a Natural Disaster
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2009
Author:Davidson, Dr. Judy E., DNP, RN, FCCM
P.I. Institution Name:Scripps Mercy Hospital, Advanced Practice Nursing and Research
Title:Director
Contact Address:4077 Fifth Ave, MER1, San Diego, CA, 92103, USA
Contact Telephone:619-243-6902
Co-Authors:David Shaw, MD, Director, Medical Education; Donna Agan, EdD, Nursing Data Analyst; Linda Good, RN, MN, COHN-S, Manager; Rene Smilde, MD, Director, Mercy Clinic; Ani Sekayan, RN, BSN, Staff Nurse.
Purpose/Aims: The purpose of this study was to identify factors which influenced the decision to come to work versus stay at home during a natural disaster. Rationale/Background: Natural disasters threaten the ability to staff the hospital. The response to fire disasters is poorly understood. The recent 2007 wildfires formed the impetus for this study. The Schwartz Center rounds is a program conducted to provide a forum for hospital practitioners from all disciplines to come together and discuss emotional and ethical issues related to the provision of healthcare. The facilitators of this program have experience providing focus groups on emotional issues. During the fires, most staff were faced with the decision of whether to come to work or stay at home. The situation posed internal conflict and a moral dilemma. Call in rate for the first day of the disaster was 10.6% vs. 0.60% (a 17 fold increase). Methods: After institutional review board approval, the Schwartz rounds was conducted as a focus group  using phenomenological research methods within 2 weeks of the wildfires. The focus group was facilitated by a psychologist using minimal probes. Notes were transcribed, manually coded for themes first independently and then as a research team. Themes were then reduced and analyzed for interrelationships. A paper trail was maintained of the coding process. Member checking was performed to validate findings. Results: Greater than 50 people attended the rounds. Eight participants provided testimony to their experience. A decision tree was constructed from the results (available at time of presentation). Three sub-themes were identified: Tension, the caring culture, and the need to help. Immediate factors in decision making were: family vulnerability, personal safety, and fire proximity. Modifiable factors were identified: past experience, perceived importance, organizational relationship, caring connection. Employees experienced tension between obligations to family, community, and organization. Employees were afflicted with tension between competing demands, despite the desire to help. This study further validates that the response to disaster is individualized based upon contextual issues such as family, safety, vulnerability, connectivity, perceived importance, past experience, and time. Implications: Leaders may impact staffing during a disaster by ensuring employees understand they have an important role during the disaster. Leaders need to recognize that a caring connection may increase the likelihood of staff attendance to work. Concerns for pets, children, and dependent adults affected decision to work. Organizational efforts to provide family/pet support may improve staffing.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleFactors Affecting Decision to Work During a Natural Disasteren_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157708-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Factors Affecting Decision to Work During a Natural Disaster</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Davidson, Dr. Judy E., DNP, RN, FCCM</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Scripps Mercy Hospital, Advanced Practice Nursing and Research</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Director</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">4077 Fifth Ave, MER1, San Diego, CA, 92103, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">619-243-6902</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">davidson.judy@scrippshealth.org, gchiker@san.rr.co</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">David Shaw, MD, Director, Medical Education; Donna Agan, EdD, Nursing Data Analyst; Linda Good, RN, MN, COHN-S, Manager; Rene Smilde, MD, Director, Mercy Clinic; Ani Sekayan, RN, BSN, Staff Nurse.</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose/Aims: The purpose of this study was to identify factors which influenced the decision to come to work versus stay at home during a natural disaster. Rationale/Background: Natural disasters threaten the ability to staff the hospital. The response to fire disasters is poorly understood. The recent 2007 wildfires formed the impetus for this study. The Schwartz Center rounds is a program conducted to provide a forum for hospital practitioners from all disciplines to come together and discuss emotional and ethical issues related to the provision of healthcare. The facilitators of this program have experience providing focus groups on emotional issues. During the fires, most staff were faced with the decision of whether to come to work or stay at home. The situation posed internal conflict and a moral dilemma. Call in rate for the first day of the disaster was 10.6% vs. 0.60% (a 17 fold increase). Methods: After institutional review board approval, the Schwartz rounds was conducted as a focus group &nbsp;using phenomenological research methods within 2 weeks of the wildfires. The focus group was facilitated by a psychologist using minimal probes. Notes were transcribed, manually coded for themes first independently and then as a research team. Themes were then reduced and analyzed for interrelationships. A paper trail was maintained of the coding process. Member checking was performed to validate findings. Results: Greater than 50 people attended the rounds. Eight participants provided testimony to their experience. A decision tree was constructed from the results (available at time of presentation). Three sub-themes were identified: Tension, the caring culture, and the need to help. Immediate factors in decision making were: family vulnerability, personal safety, and fire proximity. Modifiable factors were identified: past experience, perceived importance, organizational relationship, caring connection. Employees experienced tension between obligations to family, community, and organization. Employees were afflicted with tension between competing demands, despite the desire to help. This study further validates that the response to disaster is individualized based upon contextual issues such as family, safety, vulnerability, connectivity, perceived importance, past experience, and time. Implications: Leaders may impact staffing during a disaster by ensuring employees understand they have an important role during the disaster. Leaders need to recognize that a caring connection may increase the likelihood of staff attendance to work. Concerns for pets, children, and dependent adults affected decision to work. Organizational efforts to provide family/pet support may improve staffing.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:07:44Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:07:44Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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