22.00
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157709
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Facilitated Sensemaking: Testing of a Mid-Range Theory for Family Support
Abstract:
Facilitated Sensemaking: Testing of a Mid-Range Theory for Family Support
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2009
Author:Davidson, Judy E., DNP, RN, FCCM
P.I. Institution Name:Scripps Mercy Hospital, Advanced Practice Nursing and Research
Title:Director
Contact Address:4077 Fifth Ave, MER1, San Diego, CA, 92103, USA
Contact Telephone:619-243-6902
Co-Authors:Donna Agan, EdD, Nursing Data Analyst; Noreen Brady, PhD, RN, Associate Professor of Nursing; Barbara Daly, PhD, Professor; Patricia Higgins, PhD, RN, Associate Professor of Nursing
Aims: The purpose of this feasibility study was to pilot test and evaluate a bundle of  interventions  designed to support family members of mechanically ventilated adults as proposed within a new mid-range nursing theory entitled facilitated sensemaking. Rationale/Conceptual Basis/Background: The facilitated sensemaking theory is derived from both's adaptation model and Weick's business theory of organizational sensemaking. Family members of Intensive Care Unit (ICU) patients may develop anxiety, depression, and/or post-traumatic stress syndrome. Approaches to prevention are not well defined. Before testing preventive measures, it is important to evaluate which interventions the family will accept, use, and value. Methods: The investigator used a bundle of interventions to coach families on how to obtain information, interpret surroundings, participate in care, and use a visiting kit of supplies. Participants were asked to complete an adapted Critical Care Family Needs Inventory (aCCFNI) and program evaluation. Results: Family members of 30 patients consented to participate, 22 completed surveys. Reliability of the aCCFNI was high (Alpha = .96). Results validated the importance of informational needs and provided a score indicating family member's perception of how well each need was met, then weighted by importance to identify performance improvement opportunities for use by clinical managers. The program evaluation confirmed that family members use this format of support and found the interventions helpful. Personal care supplies (e.g., lotion, lip balm) were universally well received. Forty-two referrals to ancillary service were made. Operational issues to improve services were identified. Implications: Family members welcomed interventions targeted to help make sense of the new situation and make sense of their new role as caregiver as proposed in the facilitated sensemaking theory. Planned supportive interventions were perceived as helpful. This bundle of interventions needs to be further tested to determine the impact on health outcomes in family members of critically ill patients.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleFacilitated Sensemaking: Testing of a Mid-Range Theory for Family Supporten_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157709-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Facilitated Sensemaking: Testing of a Mid-Range Theory for Family Support</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Davidson, Judy E., DNP, RN, FCCM</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Scripps Mercy Hospital, Advanced Practice Nursing and Research</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Director</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">4077 Fifth Ave, MER1, San Diego, CA, 92103, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">619-243-6902</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">davidson.judy@scrippshealth.org, gchiker@san.rr.co</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Donna Agan, EdD, Nursing Data Analyst; Noreen Brady, PhD, RN, Associate Professor of Nursing; Barbara Daly, PhD, Professor; Patricia Higgins, PhD, RN, Associate Professor of Nursing</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Aims: The purpose of this feasibility study was to pilot test and evaluate a bundle of&nbsp; interventions&nbsp; designed to support family members of mechanically ventilated adults as proposed within a new mid-range nursing theory entitled facilitated sensemaking. Rationale/Conceptual Basis/Background: The facilitated sensemaking theory is derived from both's adaptation model and Weick's business theory of organizational sensemaking. Family members of Intensive Care Unit (ICU) patients may develop anxiety, depression, and/or post-traumatic stress syndrome. Approaches to prevention are not well defined. Before testing preventive measures, it is important to evaluate which interventions the family will accept, use, and value. Methods: The investigator used a bundle of interventions to coach families on how to obtain information, interpret surroundings, participate in care, and use a visiting kit of supplies. Participants were asked to complete an adapted Critical Care Family Needs Inventory (aCCFNI) and program evaluation. Results: Family members of 30 patients consented to participate, 22 completed surveys. Reliability of the aCCFNI was high (Alpha = .96). Results validated the importance of informational needs and provided a score indicating family member's perception of how well each need was met, then weighted by importance to identify performance improvement opportunities for use by clinical managers. The program evaluation confirmed that family members use this format of support and found the interventions helpful. Personal care supplies (e.g., lotion, lip balm) were universally well received. Forty-two referrals to ancillary service were made. Operational issues to improve services were identified. Implications: Family members welcomed interventions targeted to help make sense of the new situation and make sense of their new role as caregiver as proposed in the facilitated sensemaking theory. Planned supportive interventions were perceived as helpful. This bundle of interventions needs to be further tested to determine the impact on health outcomes in family members of critically ill patients.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:07:47Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:07:47Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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