2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157711
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Managing Hypertension: Challenges and Facilitators in Filipino Americans
Abstract:
Managing Hypertension: Challenges and Facilitators in Filipino Americans
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2009
Author:dela Cruz, Felicitas A., RN, DNSc, FAANP
P.I. Institution Name:Azusa Pacific University, School of Nursing
Title:Professor and Director, Center for the Study of Health Disparities
Contact Address:901 E. Alosta Ave., Azusa, CA, 91702, USA
Contact Telephone:626-815-5409
Co-Authors:Carmen T. Galang, RN, DNSc, Assistant Professor
Aim: As part of a larger exploratory descriptive study, this study segment sought to ascertain the challenges as well as the facilitators perceived by FAs with hypertension (HTN) in managing their illness. Rationale/Background: Epidemiological data show that the prevalence of HTN in Filipino Americans (FAs) closely approximates that of African Americans (AAs). However, in spite of their very high rate of HTN awareness and treatment, FAs have a higher rate of uncontrolled HTN than AAs, suggesting that FAs have significant challenges in managing their illness. Although this ethnic/cultural group has the second highest numbers among Asian Americans in the U.S., they remain an invisible minority. Hence, not much is known about this group's challenges and facilitators in managing HTN. Methods: Using Kleinman's explanatory model of illness as the theoretical framework, the study conducted two separate focus groups of men (n=10) and 2 separate focus groups of women (n=17), moderated by bilingual (English and Tagalog, the Philippine national language) male and female moderators, respectively. Each member of the group of participants, diagnosed and treated for HTN at least 12 months prior to the study, completed a socio-demographic form and a validated questionnaire, A Short Acculturation Scale for Filipino Americans (ASASFA).  Focus group interviews, using semi-structured questions, were tape-recorded, transcribed, coded and content analyzed for themes. To ensure trustworthiness of the qualitative study, member checks, peer debriefing, and an audit trail were implemented. Results: The participants (N=27) were all first generation FAs, whose ages ranged from 42 to 73 years, and have lived in the U.S. for an average of 25 years. Their ASASFA scores indicated that they were becoming bicultural - equally a Filipino and an American. The participants identified cultural, environmental, and personal factors that they perceived as challenges in managing their illness, especially in maintaining lifestyle changes. In addition, they acknowledged the role of social support from varying sources as facilitators in managing their illness. Implications: These findings can bring about the development of culturally appropriate interventions that would not only weaken the challenges that beset FAs with HTN but would also strengthen the factors that facilitate the management of their illness, leading to decreased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. The interventions can be replicated not only in other ethnic and cultural groups but also most especially in immigrant hypertensive Filipinos in other regions and continents of the world.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleManaging Hypertension: Challenges and Facilitators in Filipino Americansen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157711-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Managing Hypertension: Challenges and Facilitators in Filipino Americans</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">dela Cruz, Felicitas A., RN, DNSc, FAANP</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Azusa Pacific University, School of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor and Director, Center for the Study of Health Disparities</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">901 E. Alosta Ave., Azusa, CA, 91702, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">626-815-5409</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">fdelacruz@apu.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Carmen T. Galang, RN, DNSc, Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Aim: As part of a larger exploratory descriptive study, this study segment sought to ascertain the challenges as well as the facilitators perceived by FAs with hypertension (HTN) in managing their illness. Rationale/Background: Epidemiological data show that the prevalence of HTN in Filipino Americans (FAs) closely approximates that of African Americans (AAs). However, in spite of their very high rate of HTN awareness and treatment, FAs have a higher rate of uncontrolled HTN than AAs, suggesting that FAs have significant challenges in managing their illness. Although this ethnic/cultural group has the second highest numbers among Asian Americans in the U.S., they remain an invisible minority. Hence, not much is known about this group's challenges and facilitators in managing HTN. Methods: Using Kleinman's explanatory model of illness as the theoretical framework, the study conducted two separate focus groups of men (n=10) and 2 separate focus groups of women (n=17), moderated by bilingual (English and Tagalog, the Philippine national language) male and female moderators, respectively. Each member of the group of participants, diagnosed and treated for HTN at least 12 months prior to the study, completed a socio-demographic form and a validated questionnaire, A Short Acculturation Scale for Filipino Americans (ASASFA).&nbsp; Focus group interviews, using semi-structured questions, were tape-recorded, transcribed, coded and content analyzed for themes. To ensure trustworthiness of the qualitative study, member checks, peer debriefing, and an audit trail were implemented. Results: The participants (N=27) were all first generation FAs, whose ages ranged from 42 to 73 years, and have lived in the U.S. for an average of 25 years. Their ASASFA scores indicated that they were becoming bicultural - equally a Filipino and an American. The participants identified cultural, environmental, and personal factors that they perceived as challenges in managing their illness, especially in maintaining lifestyle changes. In addition, they acknowledged the role of social support from varying sources as facilitators in managing their illness. Implications: These findings can bring about the development of culturally appropriate interventions that would not only weaken the challenges that beset FAs with HTN but would also strengthen the factors that facilitate the management of their illness, leading to decreased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. The interventions can be replicated not only in other ethnic and cultural groups but also most especially in immigrant hypertensive Filipinos in other regions and continents of the world.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:07:54Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:07:54Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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