2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157714
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Impact of Baccalaureate Education Upon Patient Care Outcomes
Abstract:
The Impact of Baccalaureate Education Upon Patient Care Outcomes
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2009
Author:Dobratz, Marjorie C., DNSc., RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Washington, Tacoma, Nursing Program
Title:Professor
Contact Address:1900 Commerce St., Campus Box 358421, Tacoma, WA, 98402, USA
Contact Telephone:253-692-5676
Co-Authors:Connie Huber, RN, FACHE, Assistant Administrator, Patient Care Services; Sandra Penland, RN, MeD, Director of Nursing Practice; Ruth Rea, RN, PhD, Associate Professor
Purpose: While increased nurse education is associated with lower patient mortality, and while magnet hospital status is linked to improved care environments, few reports are found that explain how baccalaureate education changes nursing practice.  Therefore, the purpose of this presentation is to describe the impact of nurse education upon actual patient care outcomes at Providence St. Peter Hospital (PSPH). Background: With a goal of magnet status and with financial support from their Foundation, as part of an educational continuum, PSPH entered into a collaborative partnership with the University of Washington, Tacoma (UWT) Nursing Program in autumn 2005. The educational setting met its mission of creating community partnerships by responding to the hospital's need for a better-educated nurse workforce. The academic program met the hospital's need by restructuring their baccalaureate curriculum from a two-year to a three-year program, rescheduling classes from weekly to every other week, and providing on-site classes at PSPH in Olympia. The practice environment supported their nursing workforce by arranging work schedules, providing classroom support, and giving tuition assistance. An entering cohort of 23 registered nurse students was evaluated at the end of their first year of academic studies (August 2006), and 18 students who completed the program were surveyed post-graduation in August 2008. The 12 BSN graduates who responded to the second evaluation described the impact of their baccalaureate education upon their nursing practice. The hospital's records showed documentation that a better-educated nurse workforce does improve practice outcomes. Outcomes: Evidence-Based Practice (EBP) protocols that were designed in the nurses' undergraduate research courses have now been implemented at PSPH (Neutropenic Diet, Active MRSA Screening, and Physical Restraints in the Acute Care Setting). New BSN graduates are currently involved in developing additional EBP projects that are addressing: Hourly Rounding in the Oncology Unit, Probiotics, Best Practices in Pressure Ulcer Prevention, and Does Gum Chewing Hasten Post-Surgery Peristalsis?  Five new BSN graduate are serving on PSPH's Research/Evidence-Based Practice Council. Another new BSN graduate used an EBP approach in planning and implementing a multi-disciplinary Orthopedic Healing Center for elective joint replacement that resulted in high patient satisfaction scores and a decreased length of stay in the in-patient unit. As supported in the second UWT evaluation, BSN graduates stated, "I now think of patient care and nursing practice as research-based," and "I am now open to evaluating my practice and to ascertain if my practice is evidence-based." Conclusion: The demonstrated success of this unique educational-practice partnership, with documented student satisfaction and with an improved care environment, resulted in another contractual agreement between UWT and PSPH. The PSPH Foundation provided funding for a second cohort of 33 registered nurses who began baccalaureate studies in autumn 2008.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Impact of Baccalaureate Education Upon Patient Care Outcomesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157714-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Impact of Baccalaureate Education Upon Patient Care Outcomes</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Dobratz, Marjorie C., DNSc., RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Washington, Tacoma, Nursing Program</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">1900 Commerce St., Campus Box 358421, Tacoma, WA, 98402, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">253-692-5676</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">mdobratz@u.washington.edu, drdobratz@comcast. net</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Connie Huber, RN, FACHE, Assistant Administrator, Patient Care Services; Sandra Penland, RN, MeD, Director of Nursing Practice; Ruth Rea, RN, PhD, Associate Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: While increased nurse education is associated with lower patient mortality, and while magnet hospital status is linked to improved care environments, few reports are found that explain how baccalaureate education changes nursing practice. &nbsp;Therefore, the purpose of this presentation is to describe the impact of nurse education upon actual patient care outcomes at Providence St. Peter Hospital (PSPH). Background: With a goal of magnet status and with financial support from their Foundation, as part of an educational continuum, PSPH entered into a collaborative partnership with the University of Washington, Tacoma (UWT) Nursing Program in autumn 2005. The educational setting met its mission of creating community partnerships by responding to the hospital's need for a better-educated nurse workforce. The academic program met the hospital's need by restructuring their baccalaureate curriculum from a two-year to a three-year program, rescheduling classes from weekly to every other week, and providing on-site classes at PSPH in Olympia. The practice environment supported their nursing workforce by arranging work schedules, providing classroom support, and giving tuition assistance. An entering cohort of 23 registered nurse students was evaluated at the end of their first year of academic studies (August 2006), and 18 students who completed the program were surveyed post-graduation in August 2008. The 12 BSN graduates who responded to the second evaluation described the impact of their baccalaureate education upon their nursing practice. The hospital's records showed documentation that a better-educated nurse workforce does improve practice outcomes.&nbsp;Outcomes: Evidence-Based Practice (EBP) protocols that were designed in the nurses' undergraduate research courses have now been implemented at PSPH (Neutropenic Diet, Active MRSA Screening, and Physical Restraints in the Acute Care Setting). New BSN graduates are currently involved in developing additional EBP projects that are addressing: Hourly Rounding in the Oncology Unit, Probiotics, Best Practices in Pressure Ulcer Prevention, and Does Gum Chewing Hasten Post-Surgery Peristalsis?&nbsp; Five new BSN graduate are serving on PSPH's Research/Evidence-Based Practice Council. Another new BSN graduate used an EBP approach in planning and implementing a multi-disciplinary Orthopedic Healing Center for elective joint replacement that resulted in high patient satisfaction scores and a decreased length of stay in the in-patient unit. As supported in the second UWT evaluation, BSN graduates stated, &quot;I now think of patient care and nursing practice as research-based,&quot; and &quot;I am now open to evaluating my practice and to ascertain if my practice is evidence-based.&quot; Conclusion: The demonstrated success of this unique educational-practice partnership, with documented student satisfaction and with an improved care environment, resulted in another contractual agreement between UWT and PSPH. The PSPH Foundation provided funding for a second cohort of 33 registered nurses who began baccalaureate studies in autumn 2008.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:08:05Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:08:05Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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