2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157718
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Telomere Length as a Measure of Aging
Abstract:
Telomere Length as a Measure of Aging
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2009
Author:Downs, Charles A., MSN, ACNP-BC
P.I. Institution Name:University of Arizona, College of Nursing
Title:Doctoral Student
Contact Address:1305 N. Martin, PO Box 210203, Tucson, AZ, 85721, USA
Contact Telephone:520-626-6163
Co-Authors:Kathie C. Insel, PhD, RN, Associate Professor; Carrie J. Merkle, PhD, RN, FAAN, Associate Professor; David D. Montgomery, PhD, Research Associate Professor; Amy N. Vidrine, BS, Research Specialist
Problem and Rationale: Although chronological age in years is commonly used as a measure of age in human subjects, it is not necessarily the best marker of age in all investigations. In biological studies, telomere length is one of many emerging aging markers. Telomeres are DNA structures that are found at chromosome ends and that shorten with cell divisions. Telomere length and shortening has been studied in numerous cell types in cell culture and in vivo models. Following seminal work by Epel et al (PNAS 101: 17312), in which high emotional stress was found to be inversely associated with telomere length in blood mononuclear cells, there has been interest in using telomere length measurement as a marker of aging in clinical studies. The purpose here is to discuss our protocols/experience measuring telomeres in age-related studies. Methods: We have measured telomere length in a variety of cell types and models including bovine endothelial cells, human lung microvascular endothelial cells, T-cell lymphomas, rat endothelial cells, and human blood in studies designed to examine age related differences. Initial protocols involved isolating DNA then performing Southern blots using a telomere sequence-specific probe. Mean telomere restriction length was determined by analyzing digital images of the blots. More recently, the telomere assay is performed by Cawthon's method (Nucleic Acids Research 30: e47) that utilizes real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) and a Jurkat human T-cell lymphoma cell standard. Advantages of the RT-qPCR method are that it is rapid, easy to perform, and requires small amounts of DNA. The main disadvantages are that the assay is expensive and requires specialized equipment. Results and Conclusions: In our hands, telomere length measurement has been a useful marker of aging in a number of, but not all, cell types and experimental models. Due to commercially available kits and Cawthon's method which is RT-qPCR-based, both undergraduate and graduate nursing students can perform the assay with minimal training.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleTelomere Length as a Measure of Agingen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157718-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Telomere Length as a Measure of Aging</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Downs, Charles A., MSN, ACNP-BC</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Arizona, College of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Doctoral Student</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">1305 N. Martin, PO Box 210203, Tucson, AZ, 85721, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">520-626-6163</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">cdowns@nursing.arizona.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Kathie C. Insel, PhD, RN, Associate Professor; Carrie J. Merkle, PhD, RN, FAAN, Associate Professor; David D. Montgomery, PhD, Research Associate Professor; Amy N. Vidrine, BS, Research Specialist</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Problem and Rationale: Although chronological age in years is commonly used as a measure of age in human subjects, it is not necessarily the best marker of age in all investigations. In biological studies, telomere length is one of many emerging aging markers. Telomeres are DNA structures that are found at chromosome ends and that shorten with cell divisions. Telomere length and shortening has been studied in numerous cell types in cell culture and in vivo models. Following seminal work by Epel et al (PNAS 101: 17312), in which high emotional stress was found to be inversely associated with telomere length in blood mononuclear cells, there has been interest in using telomere length measurement as a marker of aging in clinical studies. The purpose here is to discuss our protocols/experience measuring telomeres in age-related studies. Methods: We have measured telomere length in a variety of cell types and models including bovine endothelial cells, human lung microvascular endothelial cells, T-cell lymphomas, rat endothelial cells, and human blood in studies designed to examine age related differences. Initial protocols involved isolating DNA then performing Southern blots using a telomere sequence-specific probe. Mean telomere restriction length was determined by analyzing digital images of the blots. More recently, the telomere assay is performed by Cawthon's method (Nucleic Acids Research 30: e47) that utilizes real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) and a Jurkat human T-cell lymphoma cell standard. Advantages of the RT-qPCR method are that it is rapid, easy to perform, and requires small amounts of DNA. The main disadvantages are that the assay is expensive and requires specialized equipment. Results and Conclusions: In our hands, telomere length measurement has been a useful marker of aging in a number of, but not all, cell types and experimental models. Due to commercially available kits and Cawthon's method which is RT-qPCR-based, both undergraduate and graduate nursing students can perform the assay with minimal training.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:08:18Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:08:18Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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