2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157719
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Symptom Burden, Loneliness, and Spirituality in Heart Failure
Abstract:
Symptom Burden, Loneliness, and Spirituality in Heart Failure
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2009
Author:Dyo, Melissa, RN, MSN, NP, CCRN
P.I. Institution Name:Azusa Pacific University, School of Nursing
Title:PhD Candidate
Contact Address:2703 Monogram Avenue, Long Beach, CA, 90815, USA
Contact Telephone:562-773-7830
Background and purpose: Over 5 million Americans suffer from heart failure.  Dyspnea and fatigue are most commonly reported, with 80% of patients experiencing these debilitating symptoms. Depression, an independent predictor of mortality, has been reported in up to 56% of this population. Given the high prevalence of physical and psychological distress in heart failure, understanding the role of potential mediators is critical. Although spirituality has been associated with improved mental health in heart failure, less is known about its relationship with symptoms and depression and the specific pathways of such relationships. Therefore, the purpose of the proposed study is to examine the strength of a conceptual model in describing symptom burden, loneliness, spirituality, and psychosocial well-being in patients with heart failure. Conceptual Framework:  The University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) Symptom Management Model provided the framework for the proposed study. Dyspnea and fatigue were conceptualized as the perception of symptoms, spirituality as influencing the evaluation of symptoms, and loneliness as the response to symptoms.  Depression and anxiety were potential outcomes impacted by the symptom experience. Methods:  A cross-sectional, correlational design will be used to examine the strength of the proposed model in patients with heart failure. Participants will be recruited from an outpatient clinic in Southern California, and will include adults aged 60 and older, diagnosed with symptomatic heart failure (NYHA class II-V). Dyspnea will be measured with the UCSD Shortness of Breath Questionnaire; fatigue with the Profile of Mood States-Fatigue subscale; loneliness with the UCLA Loneliness Scale; spirituality with the Spiritual Well-Being Scale; depression and anxiety with the Brief Symptom Inventory. Results:  Multiple regression and path analysis will be used to determine the relationships among symptom burden, spirituality, loneliness, and psychosocial well-being, while controlling for age, gender, and co-morbidities. Implications: Patients living with heart failure face potential psychological, emotional, and spiritual challenges associated with the physical symptoms of their illness. Understanding pathways between these domains will strengthen theoretical knowledge and provide insights for developing interventions to alleviate non-physical distress in heart failure.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSymptom Burden, Loneliness, and Spirituality in Heart Failureen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157719-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Symptom Burden, Loneliness, and Spirituality in Heart Failure</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Dyo, Melissa, RN, MSN, NP, CCRN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Azusa Pacific University, School of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">PhD Candidate</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">2703 Monogram Avenue, Long Beach, CA, 90815, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">562-773-7830</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">mdyo@apu.edu, meldyo@gmail.com</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Background and purpose: Over 5 million Americans suffer from heart failure.&nbsp; Dyspnea and fatigue are most commonly reported, with 80% of patients experiencing these debilitating symptoms. Depression, an independent predictor of mortality, has been reported in up to 56% of this population. Given the high prevalence of physical and psychological distress in heart failure, understanding the role of potential mediators is critical. Although spirituality has been associated with improved mental health in heart failure, less is known about its relationship with symptoms and depression and the specific pathways of such relationships. Therefore, the purpose of the proposed study is to examine the strength of a conceptual model in describing symptom burden, loneliness, spirituality, and psychosocial well-being in patients with heart failure. Conceptual Framework: &nbsp;The University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) Symptom Management Model provided the framework for the proposed study. Dyspnea and fatigue were conceptualized as the perception of symptoms, spirituality as influencing the evaluation of symptoms, and loneliness as the response to symptoms.&nbsp; Depression and anxiety were potential outcomes impacted by the symptom experience. Methods:&nbsp; A cross-sectional, correlational design will be used to examine the strength of the proposed model in patients with heart failure. Participants will be recruited from an outpatient clinic in Southern California, and will include adults aged 60 and older, diagnosed with symptomatic heart failure (NYHA class II-V). Dyspnea will be measured with the UCSD Shortness of Breath Questionnaire; fatigue with the Profile of Mood States-Fatigue subscale; loneliness with the UCLA Loneliness Scale; spirituality with the Spiritual Well-Being Scale; depression and anxiety with the Brief Symptom Inventory. Results:&nbsp; Multiple regression and path analysis will be used to determine the relationships among symptom burden, spirituality, loneliness, and psychosocial well-being, while controlling for age, gender, and co-morbidities.&nbsp;Implications: Patients living with heart failure face potential psychological, emotional, and spiritual challenges associated with the physical symptoms of their illness. Understanding pathways between these domains will strengthen theoretical knowledge and provide insights for developing interventions to alleviate non-physical distress in heart failure.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:08:21Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:08:21Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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