2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157720
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Assessing the State of Nursing Informatics Science
Abstract:
Assessing the State of Nursing Informatics Science
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2009
Author:Effken, Judith A., PhD, RN, FACMI, FAAN
P.I. Institution Name:The University of Arizona, College of Nursing
Title:Professor
Contact Address:13754 N. Keystone Springs Dr, Oro Valley, AZ, 85755, USA
Contact Telephone:520-626-6307
Co-Authors:Jane M. Carrington, PhD, RN, Assistant Professor; Nicolette Estrada, PhD, RN, Nurse Researcher
Background/Purpose/Rationale: The overall goal of this research is to use the Informatics Research Organizing Model (IROM) (Effken, 2003) to identify where we have strengths and where we have gaps in nursing informatics science. The purpose of our first analysis was to characterize nursing informatics research using the constructs in the Systems Research Organizing Model (SROM) (Brewer, Verran & Stichler, 2008) and the Systems Development Life Cycle (SDLC), the two major components of IROM. We also reviewed the research to see to what extent theories were guiding the studies. Methods: Sample: A search of CINAHL, Medline, and IE databases, as well as American Medical Informatics Symposium proceedings using various terms including nursing informatics, information systems and nursing, and (in the case of the IE database) simply nursing, resulted in 135 studies that we reviewed. Analysis: The studies were categorized by the authors along two dimensions: the four constructs of the SROM (context, client, nursing informatics innovation, and outcome) and the six components of the SDLC (planning, assessment, design, implementation, maintenance, and evaluation). Results: Of the 135 studies, 110 described some type of nursing informatics innovation. Ninety-seven identified a client and 78 reported on some type of outcome. Less than half (57) described the context in which the innovation occurred. In terms of the SDLC, about half of the 130 studies examined using this framework focused on evaluation. The number that included analysis and implementation was very similar (analysis = 33; implementation = 32). Fewer studies (27) emphasized design and still fewer (14) discussed planning. Of 128 studies, about one-third (42) utilized some kind of theoretical or conceptual framework. Generally, these represent "borrowed" theory. Implications: Nursing informatics is still a young science, but it is useful to evaluate our body of research to identify where we are focusing our efforts and where there are gaps. This preliminary study suggests that we are focusing most of our studies on evaluating various nursing informatics innovations. Perhaps because of the nature of the evaluative study, theory is not used as often as it might be and when it is, it is most likely borrowed from another discipline.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAssessing the State of Nursing Informatics Scienceen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157720-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Assessing the State of Nursing Informatics Science</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Effken, Judith A., PhD, RN, FACMI, FAAN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">The University of Arizona, College of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">13754 N. Keystone Springs Dr, Oro Valley, AZ, 85755, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">520-626-6307</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">jeffken@nursing.arizona.edu, jaeffken@comcast.net</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Jane M. Carrington, PhD, RN, Assistant Professor; Nicolette Estrada, PhD, RN, Nurse Researcher</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Background/Purpose/Rationale: The overall goal of this research is to use the Informatics Research Organizing Model (IROM) (Effken, 2003) to identify where we have strengths and where we have gaps in nursing informatics science. The purpose of our first analysis was to characterize nursing informatics research using the constructs in the Systems Research Organizing Model (SROM) (Brewer, Verran &amp; Stichler, 2008) and the Systems Development Life Cycle (SDLC), the two major components of IROM. We also reviewed the research to see to what extent theories were guiding the studies. Methods: Sample: A search of CINAHL, Medline, and IE databases, as well as American Medical Informatics Symposium proceedings using various terms including nursing informatics, information systems and nursing, and (in the case of the IE database) simply nursing, resulted in 135 studies that we reviewed. Analysis: The studies were categorized by the authors along two dimensions: the four constructs of the SROM (context, client, nursing informatics innovation, and outcome) and the six components of the SDLC (planning, assessment, design, implementation, maintenance, and evaluation). Results: Of the 135 studies, 110 described some type of nursing informatics innovation. Ninety-seven identified a client and 78 reported on some type of outcome. Less than half (57) described the context in which the innovation occurred. In terms of the SDLC, about half of the 130 studies examined using this framework focused on evaluation. The number that included analysis and implementation was very similar (analysis = 33; implementation = 32). Fewer studies (27) emphasized design and still fewer (14) discussed planning. Of 128 studies, about one-third (42) utilized some kind of theoretical or conceptual framework. Generally, these represent &quot;borrowed&quot; theory. Implications: Nursing informatics is still a young science, but it is useful to evaluate our body of research to identify where we are focusing our efforts and where there are gaps. This preliminary study suggests that we are focusing most of our studies on evaluating various nursing informatics innovations. Perhaps because of the nature of the evaluative study, theory is not used as often as it might be and when it is, it is most likely borrowed from another discipline.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:08:25Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:08:25Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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