2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157722
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Interprofessional Health Care Training: Partnering With Community Agencies
Abstract:
Interprofessional Health Care Training: Partnering With Community Agencies
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2009
Author:Elllermann, Caroline R., PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Northern Arizona University. School of Nursing
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:PO Box 15035, Flagstaff, AZ, 86011, USA
Contact Telephone:928-523-6930
Co-Authors:Marylyn Morris McEwen, PhD, PHCNS-BC, Associate Professor
Purpose:  The purpose of this project was to bring together health profession students from six disciplines to produce professionals who are competent to collaborate while learning within a cultural and rural frame. The specific aims were: 1) for students to learn to work collaboratively in an interprofessional team, 2) to stimulate future health care workers' interest in serving in rural communities, and 3) to increase understanding of cultural relevance to health care.  Rationale/Background:  Although it has been difficult to clearly identify shared and leveled requisite knowledge and skills among disciplines in the literature, the concept of interprofessional collaboration and beliefs about the necessity of the interprofessional role in providing high quality health care has been advancing. Relevant learning for working in interprofessional teams in literature relates to: 1) students understanding their own and other professions role and knowledge base, 2) human relationships [communication, attitude, ethics, adaptability and understanding group work], 3) critical thinking, and 4) decision-making.  Process:  Partnerships were established between faculty at two universities, staff at two regional Area Health Education Centers and members of grass root community-based organizations in two Arizona rural communities to co-create a unique, culturally diverse rural learning experience for interprofessional learning. Interprofessional faculty teams developed a curriculum based on five essential concepts: interprofessional teams, health information literacy, community, rural and culture. Local resources provided cultural tailoring and a rich context for learning. Students, faculty, and community partners participated in meaningful problem-based group learning in which all participants contributed from their disciplinary perspectives. Students lived in a rural community for four weeks; one community was on the U.S.-Mexico border and the other community was in the Navajo Nation. During the practicum the interprofessional team: collaborated on an issue identified as priority by the community, had a rich cultural experience, and shadowed a health professional to better understand their disciplinary role and contributions in the rural community. The community agency partners were consistently available to students. Outcomes: The students, faculty and community reported different, but equally rewarding project learning outcomes. A common theme among student, faculty, and community outcomes was high degree of satisfaction with the learning experience and the outputs; a disaster preparedness plan for the Chapter Houses and a comprehensive assessment of the older adult community.  The project established new community partnerships which has opened future learning opportunities for health profession students. This project contributes new knowledge to understanding what is needed for success in building community-based interprofessional learning experiences for health profession students and community partners.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleInterprofessional Health Care Training: Partnering With Community Agenciesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157722-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Interprofessional Health Care Training: Partnering With Community Agencies</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Elllermann, Caroline R., PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Northern Arizona University. School of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">PO Box 15035, Flagstaff, AZ, 86011, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">928-523-6930</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">caroline.ellermann@nau.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Marylyn Morris McEwen, PhD, PHCNS-BC, Associate Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose:&nbsp; The purpose of this project was to bring together health profession students from six disciplines to produce professionals who are competent to collaborate while learning within a cultural and rural frame. The specific aims were: 1) for students to learn to work collaboratively in an interprofessional team, 2) to stimulate future health care workers' interest in serving in rural communities, and 3) to increase understanding of cultural relevance to health care.&nbsp; Rationale/Background:&nbsp; Although it has been difficult to clearly identify shared and leveled requisite knowledge and skills among disciplines in the literature, the concept of interprofessional collaboration and beliefs about the necessity of the interprofessional role in providing high quality health care has been advancing. Relevant learning for working in interprofessional teams in literature relates to: 1) students understanding their own and other professions role and knowledge base, 2) human relationships [communication, attitude, ethics, adaptability and understanding group work], 3) critical thinking, and 4) decision-making.&nbsp; Process:&nbsp; Partnerships were established between faculty at two universities, staff at two regional Area Health Education Centers and members of grass root community-based organizations in two Arizona rural communities to co-create a unique, culturally diverse rural learning experience for interprofessional learning. Interprofessional faculty teams developed a curriculum based on five essential concepts: interprofessional teams, health information literacy, community, rural and culture. Local resources provided cultural tailoring and a rich context for learning. Students, faculty, and community partners participated in meaningful problem-based group learning in which all participants contributed from their disciplinary perspectives. Students lived in a rural community for four weeks; one community was on the U.S.-Mexico border and the other community was in the Navajo Nation. During the practicum the interprofessional team: collaborated on an issue identified as priority by the community, had a rich cultural experience, and shadowed a health professional to better understand their disciplinary role and contributions in the rural community. The community agency partners were consistently available to students. Outcomes: The students, faculty and community reported different, but equally rewarding project learning outcomes. A common theme among student, faculty, and community outcomes was high degree of satisfaction with the learning experience and the outputs; a disaster preparedness plan for the Chapter Houses and a comprehensive assessment of the older adult community. &nbsp;The project established new community partnerships which has opened future learning opportunities for health profession students. This project contributes new knowledge to understanding what is needed for success in building community-based interprofessional learning experiences for health profession students and community partners.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:08:31Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:08:31Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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