2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157723
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Pilot Test: The Familism Scale for Hispanic Family Caregivers
Abstract:
Pilot Test: The Familism Scale for Hispanic Family Caregivers
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2009
Author:Escandón, Socorro, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:College of Nursing, University of New Mexico, College of Nursing
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:MSC09 5350, 1 University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM, 87131-0001, USA
Contact Telephone:505-272-4556
Background: The majority of Hispanic elders, 65 and over (52.3%) live with relatives. The number of Hispanic elders continues to grow as projected from about 2.1 million in 2002 to 15.6 million by 2050. The concept of familism has been identified as an important concept/construct for Hispanic families and how they take care of their elders. Familism scales have been formulated, but these scales measure familism values in a broad and general sense and are not sufficiently specific when applied to the explicit family structure, attitude and behaviors that support caregiving activities. A scale specific to assessing family assistance with caregiving activities was developed, the Intergenerational Caregiver Familism Scale (ICFS), in order to assess individuals in caregiving roles within families of today's society. Scale Development: Followed DeVellis' (2003) guidelines for scale development. The scale items, generated from qualitative data, were assembled and the finished format employs a modified Likert scale design. The content validity of items was addressed. The extent of agreement between experts was measured by the use of a content validity index (CVI). Caregiver rating resulted in a CVI of .92. The expert panel rating resulted in a CVI of .89. Methods: The ICFS was pilot tested for initial reliability and basic evaluation of the items on a sample of 50 caregiver participants and followed up with 20 participants for initial test retest estimates. The reliability estimates included an internal consistency estimate (Cronbach's alpha) and intraclass correlation. The internal consistency estimate calculated the average of the correlations among the items using coefficient alpha with a value of .64 for Cronbach's standardized alpha. The intraclass correlation (ICC) was computed, to help determine the different variance components that enter into the reliability estimates contributed by repeated measurement on the same participants with the same instrument (test, retest) in contrast to the relationship between different variables (Pearson's correlation). Sample: The caregiver participants ranged in age from 26 to 76 years; 92% (46) female, 86% (43) self identified as Hispanic;4% (2) as Spanish; 4% (2) as Chicano; 2%(1) as Mexican American; and 4% (2) no identification. Elder ages ranged from 53 to 98. The reliability estimates for 29 items included an internal consistency estimate (Cronbach's alpha) and intraclass correlation. Results: The intraclass correlation (ICC) .61, with a 95% confidence level of .43 to .75. These results are encouraging that the scale items are internally consistent and stable, but inconclusive due to the small sample. Item analysis was done in relation to three proposed subscales. Selected items within each subscale may require deleting when the results of larger sample are determined. Significance: It is unclear why some family members accept the caregiving role and others do not in complex relationships between elders and their families. The significance of a supportive family unit continues to increase for elders requiring assistance. An objective assessment of Hispanic caregivers' family values (familism) is fundamental and relevant for healthcare professionals. The understanding of family structure, attitudes, and behaviors related to family caregiving is fundamental to the design of appropriate nursing and societal interventions that support families in caregiving situations.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePilot Test: The Familism Scale for Hispanic Family Caregiversen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157723-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Pilot Test: The Familism Scale for Hispanic Family Caregivers</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Escand&oacute;n, Socorro, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, University of New Mexico, College of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">MSC09 5350, 1 University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM, 87131-0001, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">505-272-4556</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">sescandon@salud.unm.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Background: The majority of Hispanic elders, 65 and over (52.3%) live with relatives. The number of Hispanic elders continues to grow as projected from about 2.1 million in 2002 to 15.6 million by 2050. The concept of familism has been identified as an important concept/construct for Hispanic families and how they take care of their elders. Familism scales have been formulated, but these scales measure familism values in a broad and general sense and are not sufficiently specific when applied to the explicit family structure, attitude and behaviors that support caregiving activities. A scale specific to assessing family assistance with caregiving activities was developed, the Intergenerational Caregiver Familism Scale (ICFS), in order to assess individuals in caregiving roles within families of today's society. Scale Development: Followed DeVellis' (2003) guidelines for scale development. The scale items, generated from qualitative data, were assembled and the finished format employs a modified Likert scale design. The content validity of items was addressed. The extent of agreement between experts was measured by the use of a content validity index (CVI). Caregiver rating resulted in a CVI of .92. The expert panel rating resulted in a CVI of .89. Methods: The ICFS was pilot tested for initial reliability and basic evaluation of the items on a sample of 50 caregiver participants and followed up with 20 participants for initial test retest estimates. The reliability estimates included an internal consistency estimate (Cronbach's alpha) and intraclass correlation. The internal consistency estimate calculated the average of the correlations among the items using coefficient alpha with a value of .64 for Cronbach's standardized alpha. The intraclass correlation (ICC) was computed, to help determine the different variance components that enter into the reliability estimates contributed by repeated measurement on the same participants with the same instrument (test, retest) in contrast to the relationship between different variables (Pearson's correlation). Sample: The caregiver participants ranged in age from 26 to 76 years; 92% (46) female, 86% (43) self identified as Hispanic;4% (2) as Spanish; 4% (2) as Chicano; 2%(1) as Mexican American; and 4% (2) no identification. Elder ages ranged from 53 to 98. The reliability estimates for 29 items included an internal consistency estimate (Cronbach's alpha) and intraclass correlation. Results: The intraclass correlation (ICC) .61, with a 95% confidence level of .43 to .75. These results are encouraging that the scale items are internally consistent and stable, but inconclusive due to the small sample. Item analysis was done in relation to three proposed subscales. Selected items within each subscale may require deleting when the results of larger sample are determined. Significance: It is unclear why some family members accept the caregiving role and others do not in complex relationships between elders and their families. The significance of a supportive family unit continues to increase for elders requiring assistance. An objective assessment of Hispanic caregivers' family values (familism) is fundamental and relevant for healthcare professionals. The understanding of family structure, attitudes, and behaviors related to family caregiving is fundamental to the design of appropriate nursing and societal interventions that support families in caregiving situations.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:08:35Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:08:35Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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