2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157724
Type:
Presentation
Title:
RN Satisfaction With Electronic Record Care Planning in a VA Hospital
Abstract:
RN Satisfaction With Electronic Record Care Planning in a VA Hospital
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2009
Author:Estrada, Nicolette A., PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Phoenix VA Health Care System, Nursing/118
Title:Nurse Researcher
Contact Address:650 E. Indian School Road, Phoenix, AZ, 85012, USA
Contact Telephone:602-277-5551
Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate registered nurses' satisfaction with and their perception of usability and applicability of a revised nursing diagnosis list based on North American Nursing Diagnosis Association (NANDA) and "pick & click" nursing interventions available within the electronic health record (EHR) in one acute care setting. Rationale/Conceptual Basis/Background: With the increased availability of the EHR, nurses can more readily demonstrate their contribution to patient care. Nurses are essential in the acute care setting but what nurses do is not always recognized. The contributions and value of nursing can be facilitated through documentation of the nursing plan of care, delivered interventions, and subsequent patient outcomes. Nurses recognized the value of having uniform definitions and data standards almost twenty-five years ago, demonstrated by the introduction of the Nursing Minimum Data Set (NMDS) in 1985. Standardized terminology can help detail the contribution of nursing care. However, we first need to engage nurses in using standardized nursing diagnoses in the patient care plan. Nursing diagnoses describe conditions that nurses can independently treat and provide concise labels useful for describing specific health problems. Patient-centered plans of care are formulated based on the nursing diagnosis, implementation, and evaluation. In addition to providing a measurement of patient care sensitive to nursing, the care plans provide a means of interdisciplinary communication and coordination. VA RNs, as part of an evidence-based project, developed a revised list of nursing diagnosis to replace the current list in the VA computerized patient record system based on the NANDA terminology. The Information Research Organizing (IRO) model provides a conceptual framework for this project and the research evaluating the project outcomes. Methods: Study methods included a pre- and post-test evaluation using an instrument developed based on review of the literature and evaluation needs of the evidence-based practice project. The target sample was Registered Nurses (RNs) employed in a role that included planning and providing care of hospitalized patients in one VA. Data collection occurred prior to and 6 months after implementation of revised nursing diagnosis lists in the EHR. A third collection was conducted more than a year later as an ongoing evaluation of the outcomes of the project. Data from the three sets of data collection were analyzed using t-tests and ANOVA. Results: Approximately 30-40% of the nurses meeting inclusion criteria responded to the questionnaire resulting in sample sizes of 55, 67, and 64, respectively. Responses to questions about their satisfaction and the ease of use were significantly positive. Responses to questions related to the use of the care plan for communication and assessing outcomes of nursing care were also positive but not significant. Greater than a year later, the RNs responses were similar to those reported post-implementation. Implications: The IROM provided a conceptual framework to guide and develop this project. Nurses at one VA found the use of standardized language useful and applicable to planning care for their hospitalized patients.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleRN Satisfaction With Electronic Record Care Planning in a VA Hospitalen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157724-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">RN Satisfaction With Electronic Record Care Planning in a VA Hospital</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Estrada, Nicolette A., PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Phoenix VA Health Care System, Nursing/118</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Nurse Researcher</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">650 E. Indian School Road, Phoenix, AZ, 85012, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">602-277-5551</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">Nicolette.Estrada@va.gov, nestrada2446@cox.net</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate registered nurses' satisfaction with and their perception of usability and applicability of a revised nursing diagnosis list based on North American Nursing Diagnosis Association (NANDA) and &quot;pick &amp; click&quot; nursing interventions available within the electronic health record (EHR) in one acute care setting. Rationale/Conceptual Basis/Background: With the increased availability of the EHR, nurses can more readily demonstrate their contribution to patient care. Nurses are essential in the acute care setting but what nurses do is not always recognized. The contributions and value of nursing can be facilitated through documentation of the nursing plan of care, delivered interventions, and subsequent patient outcomes. Nurses recognized the value of having uniform definitions and data standards almost twenty-five years ago, demonstrated by the introduction of the Nursing Minimum Data Set (NMDS) in 1985. Standardized terminology can help detail the contribution of nursing care. However, we first need to engage nurses in using standardized nursing diagnoses in the patient care plan. Nursing diagnoses describe conditions that nurses can independently treat and provide concise labels useful for describing specific health problems. Patient-centered plans of care are formulated based on the nursing diagnosis, implementation, and evaluation. In addition to providing a measurement of patient care sensitive to nursing, the care plans provide a means of interdisciplinary communication and coordination. VA RNs, as part of an evidence-based project, developed a revised list of nursing diagnosis to replace the current list in the VA computerized patient record system based on the NANDA terminology. The Information Research Organizing (IRO) model provides a conceptual framework for this project and the research evaluating the project outcomes. Methods: Study methods included a pre- and post-test evaluation using an instrument developed based on review of the literature and evaluation needs of the evidence-based practice project. The target sample was Registered Nurses (RNs) employed in a role that included planning and providing care of hospitalized patients in one VA. Data collection occurred prior to and 6 months after implementation of revised nursing diagnosis lists in the EHR. A third collection was conducted more than a year later as an ongoing evaluation of the outcomes of the project. Data from the three sets of data collection were analyzed using t-tests and ANOVA. Results: Approximately 30-40% of the nurses meeting inclusion criteria responded to the questionnaire resulting in sample sizes of 55, 67, and 64, respectively. Responses to questions about their satisfaction and the ease of use were significantly positive. Responses to questions related to the use of the care plan for communication and assessing outcomes of nursing care were also positive but not significant. Greater than a year later, the RNs responses were similar to those reported post-implementation. Implications: The IROM provided a conceptual framework to guide and develop this project. Nurses at one VA found the use of standardized language useful and applicable to planning care for their hospitalized patients.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:08:38Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:08:38Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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