Influences on Children's Physical Activity and Diets: Perspectives of Rural Youth

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157727
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Influences on Children's Physical Activity and Diets: Perspectives of Rural Youth
Abstract:
Influences on Children's Physical Activity and Diets: Perspectives of Rural Youth
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2009
Author:Findholt, Nancy E., PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Oregon Health and Science University, School of Nursing - La Grande Campus
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:One University Boulevard, La Grande, OR, 97850, USA
Contact Telephone:541-962-3648
Co-Authors:Victoria W. Brogoitti, BS, Director; Yvonne Michael, ScD, Assistant Professor; Linda Jerofke, PhD, Assistant Professor
The purpose of this study was to explore the perceptions of rural children concerning environmental influences on their physical activity and food choices. Although it is widely believed that environmental causes are at the root of the childhood obesity epidemic, research into the links between the environment and children's physical activity and eating habits is limited at this time. This limitation is particularly true in regard to the rural environment because nearly all of the studies that have explored the environmental correlates of children's eating and activity behaviors have been conducted in urban or suburban settings. Rural areas differ from urban and suburban places in ways that are physical, economic, and socio-cultural in nature, and these differences may have a profound effect on children's physical activities and food choices. Therefore, identifying factors that affect the diets and physical activity patterns of rural children is an essential step toward developing effective interventions for reducing obesity in this population. Forty-one fifth-grade students from four public elementary schools in rural Union County, Oregon participated in one of eight focus groups. The discussions were tape-recorded and transcribed verbatim, and the resulting data were analyzed using a modified version of focused coding and grounded theory methods. Factors identified as having a positive effect on food choices including the availability of gardens and orchards, as well as opportunities for hunting and fishing, while factors that hindered healthy diets included convenience stores near the schools, teachers who modeled unhealthy eating habits, and unappealing, processed foods served in school cafeterias. The popularity of youth sports and proximity to the natural environment (mountains, creeks, fields) were viewed as having a positive effect on physical activity, while unsafe roads, lack of bike lanes, and limited facilities and equipment for physical activity at school were perceived as hindrances to physical activity. This study built on previous research by exploring the influence of the rural environment on children's physical activity and diets. While some of the factors identified in this study also occur in non-rural settings, the findings indicate that rural communities do have unique strengths and barriers that should be considered when developing obesity prevention interventions.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleInfluences on Children's Physical Activity and Diets: Perspectives of Rural Youthen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157727-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Influences on Children's Physical Activity and Diets: Perspectives of Rural Youth</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Findholt, Nancy E., PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Oregon Health and Science University, School of Nursing - La Grande Campus</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">One University Boulevard, La Grande, OR, 97850, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">541-962-3648</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">findholt@ohsu.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Victoria W. Brogoitti, BS, Director; Yvonne Michael, ScD, Assistant Professor; Linda Jerofke, PhD, Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The purpose of this study was to explore the perceptions of rural children concerning environmental influences on their physical activity and food choices. Although it is widely believed that environmental causes are at the root of the childhood obesity epidemic, research into the links between the environment and children's physical activity and eating habits is limited at this time. This limitation is particularly true in regard to the rural environment because nearly all of the studies that have explored the environmental correlates of children's eating and activity behaviors have been conducted in urban or suburban settings. Rural areas differ from urban and suburban places in ways that are physical, economic, and socio-cultural in nature, and these differences may have a profound effect on children's physical activities and food choices. Therefore, identifying factors that affect the diets and physical activity patterns of rural children is an essential step toward developing effective interventions for reducing obesity in this population. Forty-one fifth-grade students from four public elementary schools in rural Union County, Oregon participated in one of eight focus groups. The discussions were tape-recorded and transcribed verbatim, and the resulting data were analyzed using a modified version of focused coding and grounded theory methods. Factors identified as having a positive effect on food choices including the availability of gardens and orchards, as well as opportunities for hunting and fishing, while factors that hindered healthy diets included convenience stores near the schools, teachers who modeled unhealthy eating habits, and unappealing, processed foods served in school cafeterias. The popularity of youth sports and proximity to the natural environment (mountains, creeks, fields) were viewed as having a positive effect on physical activity, while unsafe roads, lack of bike lanes, and limited facilities and equipment for physical activity at school were perceived as hindrances to physical activity. This study built on previous research by exploring the influence of the rural environment on children's physical activity and diets. While some of the factors identified in this study also occur in non-rural settings, the findings indicate that rural communities do have unique strengths and barriers that should be considered when developing obesity prevention interventions.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:08:48Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:08:48Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.