2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157728
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Forensic Nurses' Experience of Receiving Child Abuse Disclosure
Abstract:
Forensic Nurses' Experience of Receiving Child Abuse Disclosure
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2009
Author:Finn, Christine K., PhD, RN, MS, MA
P.I. Institution Name:Regis University, Nursing
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:18025 Sunburst Dr, Monument, CO, 80132, USA
Contact Telephone:719-661-6750
Purpose: The purpose of this study is to describe the context in which child abuse victims have disclosed their abuse; the forensic nurses, participants, are the teachers, and present their world in their own words from their own perspective as the professionals aiding the child victims disclose their stories. Rationale: Children are being hurt every day. A child's self-disclosure of abuse is a critical component in initiating intervention to stop the abuse. It is not yet understood why some children disclose while others remain silent, or what factors may be helpful to prompt disclosure. The primary research question was: What is the context of child abuse disclosure? Questions addressed with the informants included? Tell me your experience as a forensic nurse of hearing a disclosure from a child. As you think of these experiences, is there one situation that seems to be rather typical, to embody many of the characteristics of other child abuse disclosures? Methods: This was a descriptive qualitative study informed by narrative inquiry. Thirty forensic nurses were recruited through a flier through the International Association of Forensic Nurses and purposeful and snowball sampling techniques. Results: Data analysis was completed throughout the study using a manual technique. In-depth audio-taped interviews utilizing open-ended questions were employed to generate data. Participants told a story about the context of child abuse disclosure from their experience. Transcribed data were analyzed using qualitative descriptive and narrative inquiry techniques. Narrative structural element analysis revealed patterns and themes that emerged across the interviews. There were six major themes identified. The themes are: Initial verses secondary disclosure, setting/ environment, rapport, listening, believing, and false disclosures. Practice Implications: Believing the unbelievable MUST become an integral part of our practice when caring for potential survivors of child abuse. Building rapport, providing a supportive non-judgmental/ believing, caring, and open listening environment must be paramount in all of our interactions with children.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleForensic Nurses' Experience of Receiving Child Abuse Disclosureen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157728-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Forensic Nurses' Experience of Receiving Child Abuse Disclosure</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Finn, Christine K., PhD, RN, MS, MA</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Regis University, Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">18025 Sunburst Dr, Monument, CO, 80132, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">719-661-6750</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">cfinn@regis.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: The purpose of this study is to describe the context in which child abuse victims have disclosed their abuse; the forensic nurses, participants, are the teachers, and present their world in their own words from their own perspective as the professionals aiding the child victims disclose their stories. Rationale: Children are being hurt every day. A child's self-disclosure of abuse is a critical component in initiating intervention to stop the abuse. It is not yet understood why some children disclose while others remain silent, or what factors may be helpful to prompt disclosure. The primary research question was: What is the context of child abuse disclosure? Questions addressed with the informants included? Tell me your experience as a forensic nurse of hearing a disclosure from a child. As you think of these experiences, is there one situation that seems to be rather typical, to embody many of the characteristics of other child abuse disclosures? Methods: This was a descriptive qualitative study informed by narrative inquiry. Thirty forensic nurses were recruited through a flier through the International Association of Forensic Nurses and purposeful and snowball sampling techniques. Results: Data analysis was completed throughout the study using a manual technique. In-depth audio-taped interviews utilizing open-ended questions were employed to generate data. Participants told a story about the context of child abuse disclosure from their experience. Transcribed data were analyzed using qualitative descriptive and narrative inquiry techniques. Narrative structural element analysis revealed patterns and themes that emerged across the interviews. There were six major themes identified. The themes are: Initial verses secondary disclosure, setting/ environment, rapport, listening, believing, and false disclosures. Practice Implications: Believing the unbelievable MUST become an integral part of our practice when caring for potential survivors of child abuse. Building rapport, providing a supportive non-judgmental/ believing, caring, and open listening environment must be paramount in all of our interactions with children.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:08:51Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:08:51Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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