2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157730
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Cultural Competence and Mutual Respect: An Interdisciplinary Approach
Abstract:
Cultural Competence and Mutual Respect: An Interdisciplinary Approach
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2009
Author:Flattes, Valerie, APRN, MS, ANP-BC
P.I. Institution Name:University of Utah, College of Nursing
Title:Instructor (Clinical)
Contact Address:10 S 2000 E, Salt Lake City, UT, 84112, USA
Contact Telephone:801-585-0719
Co-Authors:Sue Chase-Cantarini, RN, MS, Assistant Clinical Professor
Purpose: The overarching theme for the University of Utah health sciences cultural competence program was mutual respect and cultural competence in health care. Cultural competence was recognized in interactions with patients, regardless of cultural background or ethnicity. It also crossed all relationships and interactions that occurred in health care settings. Background: In Spring 2002, the University of Utah Health Sciences initiated a planning process to create an interdisciplinary Cultural Competence course for all students, faculty, staff, and hospital employees. Early in the planning stages, it became evident that an interdisciplinary approach went beyond diversity training by adopting a set of critical skills for working with diverse individuals, groups, and managing relationships. Implementation: The Cultural Competence and Mutual Respect program is comprised of four modules covering the following areas: (1) Relationships and Cross Cultural Conflict, (2) Beliefs and Attitudes: Disparity of Care, (3) Systems Diversity: Solutions to Cultural Clashes, and (4) Cross Cultural Communication. The course addresses fundamental issues of creating accountability for understanding cultural and behavioral aspects of health care and ultimately building effective communication strategies. The complexities of relationships are consistently reinforced throughout the program. In Fall 2003, the four modules were implemented for all health science students and facilitated by interdisciplinary teams of faculty. Group activities include group discussions, video vignettes, case studies, integrated learning strategies, and homework assignments. Facilitators and students share real life stories, enhancing meaningful dialogue within each session. Outcomes Achieved: Interdisciplinary evaluative focus groups were implemented to collect data about the program as one evaluative outcome. Over time, faculty and facilitators are provided guidance and support in improving the interdisciplinary modules as well as integrating content into didactic and clinical courses across the curriculum. Formative and summative evaluations are also collected for program enhancement. The course has easily transitioned to include faculty new to the program and has developed into an online course to meet distance student participation. Conclusions: The modules introduce many of the newly identified AACN Cultural Competencies. There is an initial self awareness tool for students (Competency 1). Faculty invite and support open interdisciplinary dialogue (Competency 3). Other nursing courses, including courses with an international or diversity designation, address safety and quality, social justice, and other aspects of cultural competence.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCultural Competence and Mutual Respect: An Interdisciplinary Approachen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157730-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Cultural Competence and Mutual Respect: An Interdisciplinary Approach</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Flattes, Valerie, APRN, MS, ANP-BC</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Utah, College of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Instructor (Clinical)</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">10 S 2000 E, Salt Lake City, UT, 84112, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">801-585-0719</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">valerie.flattes@nurs.utah.edu, vjfnp@msn.com</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Sue Chase-Cantarini, RN, MS, Assistant Clinical Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: The overarching theme for the University of Utah health sciences cultural competence program was mutual respect and cultural competence in health care. Cultural competence was recognized in interactions with patients, regardless of cultural background or ethnicity. It also crossed all relationships and interactions that occurred in health care settings. Background: In Spring 2002, the University of Utah Health Sciences initiated a planning process to create an interdisciplinary Cultural Competence course for all students, faculty, staff, and hospital employees. Early in the planning stages, it became evident that an interdisciplinary approach went beyond diversity training by adopting a set of critical skills for working with diverse individuals, groups, and managing relationships. Implementation: The Cultural Competence and Mutual Respect program is comprised of four modules covering the following areas: (1) Relationships and Cross Cultural Conflict, (2) Beliefs and Attitudes: Disparity of Care, (3) Systems Diversity: Solutions to Cultural Clashes, and (4) Cross Cultural Communication. The course addresses fundamental issues of creating accountability for understanding cultural and behavioral aspects of health care and ultimately building effective communication strategies. The complexities of relationships are consistently reinforced throughout the program. In Fall 2003, the four modules were implemented for all health science students and facilitated by interdisciplinary teams of faculty. Group activities include group discussions, video vignettes, case studies, integrated learning strategies, and homework assignments. Facilitators and students share real life stories, enhancing meaningful dialogue within each session. Outcomes Achieved: Interdisciplinary evaluative focus groups were implemented to collect data about the program as one evaluative outcome. Over time, faculty and facilitators are provided guidance and support in improving the interdisciplinary modules as well as integrating content into didactic and clinical courses across the curriculum. Formative and summative evaluations are also collected for program enhancement. The course has easily transitioned to include faculty new to the program and has developed into an online course to meet distance student participation. Conclusions: The modules introduce many of the newly identified AACN Cultural Competencies. There is an initial self awareness tool for students (Competency 1). Faculty invite and support open interdisciplinary dialogue (Competency 3). Other nursing courses, including courses with an international or diversity designation, address safety and quality, social justice, and other aspects of cultural competence.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:08:58Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:08:58Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.