Multi-Level Analysis of Physical Activity in Hispanic Women: Toward Foundational Science

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157732
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Multi-Level Analysis of Physical Activity in Hispanic Women: Toward Foundational Science
Abstract:
Multi-Level Analysis of Physical Activity in Hispanic Women: Toward Foundational Science
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2009
Author:Fleury, Julie, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Arizona State University, College of Nursing & Healthcare Innovation
Title:Hanner Professor and Associate Dean for Research, Director PhD Program
Contact Address:500 N. 3rd Street, Phoenix, AZ, 85004, USA
Contact Telephone:602-496-0779
Co-Authors:Colleen Keller, PhD, Professor; Adriana Perez, MSN, Doctoral Student; Felipe Castro, PhD, Professor
Purpose: The purpose of this paper is twofold: (1) using a multi-level perspective, to provide a descriptive review of literature relevant to physical activity among Hispanic women and (2) to recommend future directions to foster translational physical activity research to foster the design of culturally-embedded interventions. Rationale: Physical inactivity has been identified as affecting the largest segment of the population. Although research concerning physical activity in Hispanic populations is limited, data indicate that Hispanic women have low levels of physical activity and higher levels of subsequent health risk when compared to other populations. While there has been marked progress in the development and testing of behavioral strategies to promote regular physical activity, there has been limited synthesis of research findings relevant to Hispanic women. The challenge remains to critically examine these findings as a foundation for translation into practice. Methods: A computer-assisted search using keywords Latina or Hispanic, exercise, physical activity in four databases from January 1990 to May 2008 was conducted. Original articles reported: (a) empirical data derived from qualitative, descriptive, correlational, or intervention methodology; (b) sample primarily or completely of Hispanic women; provided distinct findings for Hispanic women; (c) outcome or descriptor variable of physical activity. Data were extracted and categorized using data display matrices consistent with a multi-level, social ecological perspective, outlined by the Institute of Medicine as levels of influence essential to health promotion (Smedley & Syme, 2000): intrapersonal, interpersonal, community and environment, and organizational. Matrices and the original reports were iteratively reviewed and compared to qualitatively analyze and synthesize results. Results: Data characterize the environments of persons and communities as multidimensional, encompassing social and contextual as well as physical components. Across social ecological categories, specific factors were identified as "leverage points" for culturally-embedded translational research influencing physical activity among Hispanic women. Although existing research supports individual attributes as influencing physical activity, less is known about potentially modifiable social and contextual correlates and how these might be influenced. Implications: Understanding and addressing social, cultural, and contextual factors associated with physical activity among Hispanic women is necessary to establish comprehensive, translational intervention programs within community settings. Despite encouraging findings, the creation of a sound foundation for translational research requires that researchers and clinicians continue to identify key areas for development in promoting physical activity among Hispanic women.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMulti-Level Analysis of Physical Activity in Hispanic Women: Toward Foundational Scienceen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157732-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Multi-Level Analysis of Physical Activity in Hispanic Women: Toward Foundational Science</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Fleury, Julie, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Arizona State University, College of Nursing &amp; Healthcare Innovation</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Hanner Professor and Associate Dean for Research, Director PhD Program</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">500 N. 3rd Street, Phoenix, AZ, 85004, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">602-496-0779</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">Julie.fleury@asu.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Colleen Keller, PhD, Professor; Adriana Perez, MSN, Doctoral Student; Felipe Castro, PhD, Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: The purpose of this paper is twofold: (1) using a multi-level perspective, to provide a descriptive review of literature relevant to physical activity among Hispanic women and (2) to recommend future directions to foster translational physical activity research to foster the design of culturally-embedded interventions. Rationale: Physical inactivity has been identified as affecting the largest segment of the population. Although research concerning physical activity in Hispanic populations is limited, data indicate that Hispanic women have low levels of physical activity and higher levels of subsequent health risk when compared to other populations. While there has been marked progress in the development and testing of behavioral strategies to promote regular physical activity, there has been limited synthesis of research findings relevant to Hispanic women. The challenge remains to critically examine these findings as a foundation for translation into practice. Methods: A computer-assisted search using keywords Latina or Hispanic, exercise, physical activity in four databases from January 1990 to May 2008 was conducted. Original articles reported: (a) empirical data derived from qualitative, descriptive, correlational, or intervention methodology; (b) sample primarily or completely of Hispanic women; provided distinct findings for Hispanic women; (c) outcome or descriptor variable of physical activity. Data were extracted and categorized using data display matrices consistent with a multi-level, social ecological perspective, outlined by the Institute of Medicine as levels of influence essential to health promotion (Smedley &amp; Syme, 2000): intrapersonal, interpersonal, community and environment, and organizational. Matrices and the original reports were iteratively reviewed and compared to qualitatively analyze and synthesize results. Results: Data characterize the environments of persons and communities as multidimensional, encompassing social and contextual as well as physical components. Across social ecological categories, specific factors were identified as &quot;leverage points&quot; for culturally-embedded translational research influencing physical activity among Hispanic women. Although existing research supports individual attributes as influencing physical activity, less is known about potentially modifiable social and contextual correlates and how these might be influenced. Implications: Understanding and addressing social, cultural, and contextual factors associated with physical activity among Hispanic women is necessary to establish comprehensive, translational intervention programs within community settings. Despite encouraging findings, the creation of a sound foundation for translational research requires that researchers and clinicians continue to identify key areas for development in promoting physical activity among Hispanic women.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:09:05Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:09:05Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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