Use of Lay Health Advisors in Culturally-Embedded Health Promotion Interventions

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157733
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Use of Lay Health Advisors in Culturally-Embedded Health Promotion Interventions
Abstract:
Use of Lay Health Advisors in Culturally-Embedded Health Promotion Interventions
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2009
Author:Fleury, Julie, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Arizona State University, College of Nursing & Healthcare Innovation
Title:Hanner Professor and Associate Dean for Research, Director PhD Program
Contact Address:500 N. 3rd Street, Phoenix, AZ, 85004, USA
Contact Telephone:602-496-0779
Co-Authors:Colleen Keller, PhD, Professor; Adriana Perez, MSN, Doctoral Student
Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to: (1) provide a comprehensive review and evaluation of the roles, evaluation, and effectiveness of Lay Health Advisors (LHA) in community based programs with an emphasis on cardiovascular risk reduction (CVD); and (2) provide recommendations for future research involving LHA in such programs. Rationale: Noted health disparities among ethnic and underserved groups might be best addressed with programs designed to enhance awareness and development of resources within a context of community support. The involvement of LHA in the design, implementation, and evaluation of health promoting interventions has been proposed to ensure that programs are culturally-embedded, address issues of importance to the community, and promote sustainable, community-wide change. Such interventions may be key to health promotion in Hispanic women. Methods: A computer-assisted search using keywords Lay Health Advisor, natural helper, peer health educator, promotora de salud, cardiovascular risk, disease management, health promotion in five databases from 1980-2007 was conducted. Original articles reported: (a) data-based, LHA-facilitated CVD risk reduction intervention; (b) study outcomes delineated beyond a description of the program. LHA was defined consistent with the Cochrane Collaboration (2005). Data were extracted and evaluated using data display matrices; variables for analysis include target population, specified health behavior change, theoretical perspective, intervention implementation strategies, LHA role, LHA training, study outcomes, and documentation of LHA process data. Results: Twenty studies were identified concerning LHA interventions for CVD risk reduction. Overall, LHA interventions resulted in positive outcomes. However, differences in populations targeted, outcomes, and LHA roles make it difficult to draw conclusions about overall effectiveness. Best practices for LHA interventions in CVD risk reduction include: (a) Selection and development of LHA as a role model and support from the community of interest. (b) Involvement of LHA in formative and summative research exploring community concerns, strengths, and resources. (c) Specification and ongoing evaluation of the LHA role, role implementation, and training. (d) Outcome measures consistent with intervention critical inputs. Implications: Next steps for development of the science related to culturally-embedded LHA interventions for CVD risk reduction in Hispanic women include: (a) Clear specification of the role of the LHA in intervention; (b) stronger operationalization and testing of theoretical frameworks for LHA interventions, including evaluation of multilevel frameworks and analysis of the theoretical mechanisms through which LHA effect risk reducing behaviors; and (c) evaluation of the impact of LHA interventions on resource development, utilization, and community capacity.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleUse of Lay Health Advisors in Culturally-Embedded Health Promotion Interventionsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157733-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Use of Lay Health Advisors in Culturally-Embedded Health Promotion Interventions</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Fleury, Julie, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Arizona State University, College of Nursing &amp; Healthcare Innovation</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Hanner Professor and Associate Dean for Research, Director PhD Program</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">500 N. 3rd Street, Phoenix, AZ, 85004, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">602-496-0779</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">Julie.fleury@asu.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Colleen Keller, PhD, Professor; Adriana Perez, MSN, Doctoral Student</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to: (1) provide a comprehensive review and evaluation of the roles, evaluation, and effectiveness of Lay Health Advisors (LHA) in community based programs with an emphasis on cardiovascular risk reduction (CVD); and (2) provide recommendations for future research involving LHA in such programs. Rationale: Noted health disparities among ethnic and underserved groups might be best addressed with programs designed to enhance awareness and development of resources within a context of community support. The involvement of LHA in the design, implementation, and evaluation of health promoting interventions has been proposed to ensure that programs are culturally-embedded, address issues of importance to the community, and promote sustainable, community-wide change. Such interventions may be key to health promotion in Hispanic women. Methods: A computer-assisted search using keywords Lay Health Advisor, natural helper, peer health educator, promotora de salud, cardiovascular risk, disease management, health promotion in five databases from 1980-2007 was conducted. Original articles reported: (a) data-based, LHA-facilitated CVD risk reduction intervention; (b) study outcomes delineated beyond a description of the program. LHA was defined consistent with the Cochrane Collaboration (2005). Data were extracted and evaluated using data display matrices; variables for analysis include target population, specified health behavior change, theoretical perspective, intervention implementation strategies, LHA role, LHA training, study outcomes, and documentation of LHA process data. Results: Twenty studies were identified concerning LHA interventions for CVD risk reduction. Overall, LHA interventions resulted in positive outcomes. However, differences in populations targeted, outcomes, and LHA roles make it difficult to draw conclusions about overall effectiveness. Best practices for LHA interventions in CVD risk reduction include: (a) Selection and development of LHA as a role model and support from the community of interest. (b) Involvement of LHA in formative and summative research exploring community concerns, strengths, and resources. (c) Specification and ongoing evaluation of the LHA role, role implementation, and training. (d) Outcome measures consistent with intervention critical inputs. Implications: Next steps for development of the science related to culturally-embedded LHA interventions for CVD risk reduction in Hispanic women include: (a) Clear specification of the role of the LHA in intervention; (b) stronger operationalization and testing of theoretical frameworks for LHA interventions, including evaluation of multilevel frameworks and analysis of the theoretical mechanisms through which LHA effect risk reducing behaviors; and (c) evaluation of the impact of LHA interventions on resource development, utilization, and community capacity.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:09:09Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:09:09Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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