2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157736
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Technology to Improve Data Collection
Abstract:
Technology to Improve Data Collection
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2009
Author:Gance-Cleveland, Bonnie, RNC, PNP, PhD, FAAN
P.I. Institution Name:Arizona State University, College of Nursing & Healthcare Innovation
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:500 N. 3rd Street, Phoenix, AZ, 85004-0698, USA
Contact Telephone:602-496-0908
Co-Authors:Kevin Gilbert, PhD, CEO; Lynn Howe Gilbert, RN, CPNP, PhD, Associate Professor; Mary Mays, PhD
Purpose: The purpose of this presentation is to describe the use of mobile computer technologies to improve the quality of research data collected from children and teens. Background:  Critical public health problems among children and teens, such as obesity, depression, and substance abuse deserve extensive research on potential prevention and intervention strategies.  Current data collection methods are a significant barrier to this research and its translation into practice.  Although a variety of physiologic measures and psychometrically sound measures of health-promoting attitudes and behaviors exist for children and teens, virtually all of them are traditional paper and pencil surveys.  These instruments impose significant burden on subjects and staff, and often exclude those who do not read well, who are not native English speakers, or who have perceptual-motor disabilities.  In addition, the problem is compounded by the time intensive calculation of physiologic measures and comparison to age and gender specific norms (BMI% and BP%). Further, the transcription of the data into computer databases for statistical analysis imposes significant burden on investigators and is the source of substantial error unless detailed quality control procedures are used.  These issues of subject and investigator burden make it impossible for most clinicians to translate research interventions into practice and outcome management protocols.  Thus, methods are needed for collecting age-appropriate data from children and teens in a manner that is engaging, employs multiple modes of interaction, and takes advantage of computer technologies for acquiring data in real time. Methods:  Computer-based clinical tools for calculating and processing physiologic data and a battery of computer assisted interviews assessing beliefs, attitudes, health history, personal adjustment, developmental assets, acculturation, and risk behavior have been created to assist researchers with real-time data collection from children and teens. Results: Programming of the computer tools has been completed and evaluation of their feasibility and psychometric properties is in progress. Implications: Data collection techniques that reduce subject burden, decrease investigator workload, and eliminate transcription error not only improve the quality of research, but also facilitate rapid translation of research findings into practice.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleTechnology to Improve Data Collectionen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157736-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Technology to Improve Data Collection</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Gance-Cleveland, Bonnie, RNC, PNP, PhD, FAAN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Arizona State University, College of Nursing &amp; Healthcare Innovation</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">500 N. 3rd Street, Phoenix, AZ, 85004-0698, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">602-496-0908</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">Bonnie.Gance-Cleveland@asu.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Kevin Gilbert, PhD, CEO; Lynn Howe Gilbert, RN, CPNP, PhD, Associate Professor; Mary Mays, PhD</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: The purpose of this presentation is to describe the use of mobile computer technologies to improve the quality of research data collected from children and teens.&nbsp;Background: &nbsp;Critical public health problems among children and teens, such as obesity, depression, and substance abuse deserve extensive research on potential prevention and intervention strategies.&nbsp; Current data collection methods are a significant barrier to this research and its translation into practice.&nbsp; Although a variety of physiologic measures and psychometrically sound measures of health-promoting attitudes and behaviors exist for children and teens, virtually all of them are traditional paper and pencil surveys.&nbsp; These instruments impose significant burden on subjects and staff, and often exclude those who do not read well, who are not native English speakers, or who have perceptual-motor disabilities.&nbsp; In addition, the problem is compounded by the time intensive calculation of physiologic measures and comparison to age and gender specific norms (BMI% and BP%). Further, the transcription of the data into computer databases for statistical analysis imposes significant burden on investigators and is the source of substantial error unless detailed quality control procedures are used.&nbsp; These issues of subject and investigator burden make it impossible for most clinicians to translate research interventions into practice and outcome management protocols.&nbsp; Thus, methods are needed for collecting age-appropriate data from children and teens in a manner that is engaging, employs multiple modes of interaction, and takes advantage of computer technologies for acquiring data in real time.&nbsp;Methods: &nbsp;Computer-based clinical tools for calculating and processing physiologic data and a battery of computer assisted interviews assessing beliefs, attitudes, health history, personal adjustment, developmental assets, acculturation, and risk behavior have been created to assist researchers with real-time data collection from children and teens.&nbsp;Results: Programming of the computer tools has been completed and evaluation of their feasibility and psychometric properties is in progress. Implications: Data collection techniques that reduce subject burden, decrease investigator workload, and eliminate transcription error not only improve the quality of research, but also facilitate rapid translation of research findings into practice.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:09:18Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:09:18Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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