9.00
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157738
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Closing the Loop: A Report on the Effectiveness of a Concept-Based Curriculum
Abstract:
Closing the Loop: A Report on the Effectiveness of a Concept-Based Curriculum
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2009
Author:Giddens, Jean Foret, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of New Mexico, College of Nursing
Title:Professor and Interim Sr. Assoc Dean for Academic Affairs
Contact Address:MSC09 5350, 1 University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM, 87131-0001, USA
Contact Telephone:505-272-0716
Purpose: In the spring of 2006, an innovative concept-based undergraduate curriculum was launched at a baccalaureate nursing program in the Southwest. The purpose of this presentation is to describe the evaluation process and findings. Background Specific goals of the new curriculum were to produce diverse graduates with conceptual thinking skills, committed to life-long learning, and who embrace working in teams within community and acute care environments.  The conceptual foundation of the curriculum, with a strong emphasis on life-span, health-illness, and care delivery continuums, was developed with the hope of managing excessive curricular content and fostering a conceptual learning environment at the undergraduate level (Giddens, et al, 2008).  A characteristic of conceptual learning environments is student-centered learning. This differs dramatically from the content driven, instructor-centered approaches typically seen in nursing education.  Acknowledging the need for a more diverse workforce (IOM, 2004), new admission criteria were also implemented to facilitate the admission of students mirroring the population diversity within the community. A comprehensive evaluation plan incorporating assessment, accreditation, and benchmarking models was implemented. Surveys, standardized instruments, and focus groups were used to collect data. Outcomes: Two years after the curriculum was implemented, data were formally analyzed.  Among the first 3 cohorts, 97.5% of admitted students (N=200) graduated. Efforts to increase the diversity were successful as evidenced by 52% of graduates representing minority populations (compared to 38.4% prior to implementing the new curriculum). First time NCLEX pass rate from the first 2 cohorts was 83% compared to 90% prior to the curriculum change.  Feedback from students, faculty, graduates, and external constituents has reinforced our commitment to the conceptual approach as foundational to the curriculum. Identified strengths included the conceptual approach (particularly Health and Illness courses), interactive learning activities, and clinical intensives. The findings validated that the featured concepts and exemplars were appropriate, but an identified concern was perceived repetition in the Nursing Concept courses when they were presented repeatedly using increasingly complex exemplars. Students and faculty also voiced a need for greater age-span, pharmacology, and pathophysiology content ? despite the fact that these are required prerequisite courses.  This perhaps points to the need for more purposeful linkages of concepts to previous content learned, and stronger links of concepts within clinical courses. Conclusions: Based on the evaluation data, opportunities for curriculum improvements were identified and are being implemented. The primary revisions included improved clarity and delivery of the Nursing Concept courses, purposeful linkages to prerequisite content, and enhancement of concepts across multiple clinical contexts.  The faculty are proud about successfully increasing the diversity of our graduates, but given the first-time NCLEX pass rates of this group, additional academic support and NCLEX preparation is needed.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleClosing the Loop: A Report on the Effectiveness of a Concept-Based Curriculumen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157738-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Closing the Loop: A Report on the Effectiveness of a Concept-Based Curriculum</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Giddens, Jean Foret, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of New Mexico, College of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor and Interim Sr. Assoc Dean for Academic Affairs</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">MSC09 5350, 1 University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM, 87131-0001, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">505-272-0716</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">jgiddens@salud.unm.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: In the spring of 2006, an innovative concept-based undergraduate curriculum was launched at a baccalaureate nursing program in the Southwest. The purpose of this presentation is to describe the evaluation process and findings. Background Specific goals of the new curriculum were to produce diverse graduates with conceptual thinking skills, committed to life-long learning, and who embrace working in teams within community and acute care environments.&nbsp; The conceptual foundation of the curriculum, with a strong emphasis on life-span, health-illness, and care delivery continuums, was developed with the hope of managing excessive curricular content and fostering a conceptual learning environment at the undergraduate level (Giddens, et al, 2008).&nbsp; A characteristic of conceptual learning environments is student-centered learning. This differs dramatically from the content driven, instructor-centered approaches typically seen in nursing education.&nbsp; Acknowledging the need for a more diverse workforce (IOM, 2004), new admission criteria were also implemented to facilitate the admission of students mirroring the population diversity within the community. A comprehensive evaluation plan incorporating assessment, accreditation, and benchmarking models was implemented. Surveys, standardized instruments, and focus groups were used to collect data. Outcomes: Two years after the curriculum was implemented, data were formally analyzed.&nbsp; Among the first 3 cohorts, 97.5% of admitted students (N=200) graduated. Efforts to increase the diversity were successful as evidenced by 52% of graduates representing minority populations (compared to 38.4% prior to implementing the new curriculum). First time NCLEX pass rate from the first 2 cohorts was 83% compared to 90% prior to the curriculum change.&nbsp; Feedback from students, faculty, graduates, and external constituents has reinforced our commitment to the conceptual approach as foundational to the curriculum. Identified strengths included the conceptual approach (particularly Health and Illness courses), interactive learning activities, and clinical intensives. The findings validated that the featured concepts and exemplars were appropriate, but an identified concern was perceived repetition in the Nursing Concept courses when they were presented repeatedly using increasingly complex exemplars. Students and faculty also voiced a need for greater age-span, pharmacology, and pathophysiology content ? despite the fact that these are required prerequisite courses. &nbsp;This perhaps points to the need for more purposeful linkages of concepts to previous content learned, and stronger links of concepts within clinical courses.&nbsp;Conclusions: Based on the evaluation data, opportunities for curriculum improvements were identified and are being implemented. The primary revisions included improved clarity and delivery of the Nursing Concept courses, purposeful linkages to prerequisite content, and enhancement of concepts across multiple clinical contexts. &nbsp;The faculty are proud about successfully increasing the diversity of our graduates, but given the first-time NCLEX pass rates of this group, additional academic support and NCLEX preparation is needed.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:09:25Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:09:25Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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