Predictors & Outcomes of Early Adherence to the Use of an Asynchronous Telehealth Device

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157741
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Predictors & Outcomes of Early Adherence to the Use of an Asynchronous Telehealth Device
Abstract:
Predictors & Outcomes of Early Adherence to the Use of an Asynchronous Telehealth Device
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2009
Author:Guzman, Jenice, PhD(c), RN, GNP-BC
P.I. Institution Name:UCLA School of Nursing
Title:Gerontological Nurse Practitioner, Doctoral Student
Contact Address:8180 Manitoba Street #314, Playa del Rey, CA, 90293, USA
Contact Telephone:310-268-3088
Purpose: The first purpose of this research study is to describe adherence to an asynchronous telehealth device called the Healthy Buddy System, which is the most commonly used telehealth device by older veterans with heart failure (HF) enrolled in the Veterans Administration (VA) Office of Care Coordination, Care Coordination/Home Telehealth (CCHT) Program. The second purpose of this study is to determine the predictors of adherence to Health Buddy in the first 90 days of enrollment.  The third purpose is to determine the association between adherence to Health Buddy and outcomes in the same sample of patients in the first 90 days of enrollment. Background: Patient non-adherence to home telehealth is a problem voiced by nurses/care coordinators.  There is a paucity of studies that have examined predictors of adherence to home telehealth use or how adherence to home telehealth is related to outcomes.  Methods: This retrospective cohort study will use secondary data.  Veterans enrolled in the VA CCHT program in VISN 22 between 6/1/06 and 6/1/08, who are over the age of 65 and have HF identified as a Disease Management Program used in the Health Buddy system will be included.  Patients' adherence to Health Buddy, perceived health status, and satisfaction will be obtained through Health Hero, VA vendor who collects VA data from veterans via the Health Buddy system and stored on a server at the VA Austin Information Technology Center.  Sociodemographic data, diagnoses, health status, and healthcare utilization will be obtained from VA National Patient Care Database.  A programmer experienced in working with VA databases will de-identify and merge the datasets prior to analysis.  Multiple linear regression and block entry design will be used to determine the extent to which predictors explain variance in adherence.  Simple linear and logistic regressions will be used to examine the relationship between adherence and outcomes. Expected results: This study will increase our understanding of factors that predict adherence to an asynchronous telehealth device and will shed light on whether early adherence is associated with improved health outcomes. Implications: This study can provide guidance to nurses and program developers interested in initiating a telehealth program for community-dwelling older adults to decide which patient population to target, to encourage systematic review of adherence, and to utilize health outcomes that are sensitive to early adherence in order to effectively evaluate program success.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePredictors & Outcomes of Early Adherence to the Use of an Asynchronous Telehealth Deviceen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157741-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Predictors &amp; Outcomes of Early Adherence to the Use of an Asynchronous Telehealth Device</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Guzman, Jenice, PhD(c), RN, GNP-BC</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">UCLA School of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Gerontological Nurse Practitioner, Doctoral Student</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">8180 Manitoba Street #314, Playa del Rey, CA, 90293, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">310-268-3088</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">Jenice.Guzman@va.gov, jsguzman@ucla.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: The first purpose of this research study is to describe adherence to an asynchronous telehealth device called the Healthy Buddy System, which is the most commonly used telehealth device by older veterans with heart failure (HF) enrolled in the Veterans Administration (VA) Office of Care Coordination, Care Coordination/Home Telehealth (CCHT) Program. The second purpose of this study is to determine the predictors of adherence to Health Buddy in the first 90 days of enrollment.&nbsp; The third purpose is to determine the association between adherence to Health Buddy and outcomes in the same sample of patients in the first 90 days of enrollment.&nbsp;Background: Patient non-adherence to home telehealth is a problem voiced by nurses/care coordinators.&nbsp; There is a paucity of studies that have examined predictors of adherence to home telehealth use or how adherence to home telehealth is related to outcomes.&nbsp; Methods:&nbsp;This retrospective cohort study will use secondary data.&nbsp; Veterans enrolled in the VA CCHT program in VISN 22 between 6/1/06 and 6/1/08, who are over the age of 65 and have HF identified as a Disease Management Program used in the Health Buddy system will be included.&nbsp; Patients' adherence to Health Buddy, perceived health status, and satisfaction will be obtained through Health Hero, VA vendor who collects VA data from veterans via the Health Buddy system and stored on a server at the VA Austin Information Technology Center.&nbsp; Sociodemographic data, diagnoses, health status, and healthcare utilization will be obtained from VA National Patient Care Database.&nbsp; A programmer experienced in working with VA databases will de-identify and merge the datasets prior to analysis.&nbsp; Multiple linear regression and block entry design will be used to determine the extent to which predictors explain variance in adherence.&nbsp; Simple linear and logistic regressions will be used to examine the relationship between adherence and outcomes.&nbsp;Expected results:&nbsp;This study will increase our understanding of factors that predict adherence to an asynchronous telehealth device and will shed light on whether early adherence is associated with improved health outcomes. Implications:&nbsp;This study can provide guidance to nurses and program developers interested in initiating a telehealth program for community-dwelling older adults to decide which patient population to target, to encourage systematic review of adherence, and to utilize health outcomes that are sensitive to early adherence in order to effectively evaluate program success.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:09:36Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:09:36Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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