2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157748
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Healthcare Access Among Women Prisoners
Abstract:
Healthcare Access Among Women Prisoners
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2009
Author:Hatton, Diane C., RN, DNSc
P.I. Institution Name:San Diego State University, Nursing
Title:Professor
Contact Address:5500 Campanile Drive, San Diego, CA, 92182, USA
Contact Telephone:619-594-5447
Co-Authors:Anastasia A. Fisher, DNSc, RN, Associate Professor
Purpose/Aim: This poster presents findings from a study using community-based participatory research (CBPR) that examined how women prisoners' accessed health care in jail and prison. Background: The past twenty-five years have witnessed an unprecedented increase in the number of women in US jails and prisons. Women now represent the fastest growing segment of the jail and prison populations. Female rates of incarceration reflect ethnic/racial disparities in the US with African-American and Hispanic women incarcerated at disproportionately higher rates than their White counterparts. Women prisoners are often poor and have a high incidence of serious health concerns, including HIV, Hepatitis C, TB, MRSA, and sexually transmitted infections. They also have higher pregnancy rates than their non-incarcerated cohorts in the general population as well as histories of violence, depression, substance abuse and other mental illness. Method: This exploratory study used focus groups in a qualitative, CBPR design. Throughout the project, the investigators maintained contact with Community Advisory Board (CAB) members from a local grass roots agency that assists women in the transition from jail or prison to the community. A co-researcher from this agency participated in each phase of the project. Thirty-one women released from jail or prison participated. Their average age was 38; years of education were 12; and average number of children was 2. Participants reported having an average of 6 incarcerations in a local jail and 1 incarceration in prison. Fifty-five percent of the sample was non-white. Results:  Participants reported a myriad of physical, mental, and social health concerns. They reported difficulties in the management of chronic illness including hypertension, asthma, diabetes, addiction, and other mental illnesses. They described the problems that surround pregnancy for prisoners and maintenance of adequate hygiene. These health concerns were exacerbated by a healthcare system that required co-payments, interrupted routine and follow-up care, and placed a burden on prisoners as well as their families. Participants received minimal preventive care. Implications: The findings highlight the detrimental impact of limited healthcare access on women prisoners' health. Participants indicated they often endured health problems or sought care as a last resort only after a problem worsened because they lacked healthcare access. Recommendations for future research include studies that further examine healthcare access for this vulnerable population both during and after incarceration.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHealthcare Access Among Women Prisonersen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157748-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Healthcare Access Among Women Prisoners</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Hatton, Diane C., RN, DNSc</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">San Diego State University, Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">5500 Campanile Drive, San Diego, CA, 92182, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">619-594-5447</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">dhatton@mail.sdsu.edu, hattondc@aol.com</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Anastasia A. Fisher, DNSc, RN, Associate Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose/Aim: This poster presents findings from a study using community-based participatory research (CBPR) that examined how women prisoners' accessed health care in jail and prison. Background: The past twenty-five years have witnessed an unprecedented increase in the number of women in US jails and prisons. Women now represent the fastest growing segment of the jail and prison populations. Female rates of incarceration reflect ethnic/racial disparities in the US with African-American and Hispanic women incarcerated at disproportionately higher rates than their White counterparts. Women prisoners are often poor and have a high incidence of serious health concerns, including HIV, Hepatitis C, TB, MRSA, and sexually transmitted infections. They also have higher pregnancy rates than their non-incarcerated cohorts in the general population as well as histories of violence, depression, substance abuse and other mental illness.&nbsp;Method: This exploratory study used focus groups in a qualitative, CBPR design. Throughout the project, the investigators maintained contact with Community Advisory Board (CAB) members from a local grass roots agency that assists women in the transition from jail or prison to the community. A co-researcher from this agency participated in each phase of the project. Thirty-one women released from jail or prison participated. Their average age was 38; years of education were 12; and average number of children was 2. Participants reported having an average of 6 incarcerations in a local jail and 1 incarceration in prison. Fifty-five percent of the sample was non-white. Results:&nbsp; Participants reported a myriad of physical, mental, and social health concerns. They reported difficulties in the management of chronic illness including hypertension, asthma, diabetes, addiction, and other mental illnesses. They described the problems that surround pregnancy for prisoners and maintenance of adequate hygiene. These health concerns were exacerbated by a healthcare system that required co-payments, interrupted routine and follow-up care, and placed a burden on prisoners as well as their families. Participants received minimal preventive care. Implications: The findings highlight the detrimental impact of limited healthcare access on women prisoners' health. Participants indicated they often endured health problems or sought care as a last resort only after a problem worsened because they lacked healthcare access. Recommendations for future research include studies that further examine healthcare access for this vulnerable population both during and after incarceration.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:09:59Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:09:59Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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