2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157749
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Perceptions of Nurse's Caring Behaviors by Family Members of Trauma Patients
Abstract:
Perceptions of Nurse's Caring Behaviors by Family Members of Trauma Patients
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2009
Author:Hayes, Janice S., PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Northern Colorado, Nursing
Title:Professor
Contact Address:6300 W. 4th Street Road, Greeley, CO, 80634, USA
Contact Telephone:970-351-1690
Co-Authors:Lory Clukey, Associate Professor; Denise Curtis, Graduate Assistant; Alison Merrill, Assistant Professor
Purpose/Aims: To assess perceptions of nurse's caring among adult family members of traumatically injured patients. Background: Nursing claims a fundamental moral commitment to caring.  Some nursing theorists have posed that caring is the essence of nursing.  Research on caring in trauma patients is minimal in the published literature. Research conducted on caring with injured and trauma patients have included patients that have fairly minor injuries leaving many questions about how caring is perceived in the more severely injured.  This is the context of the current study of perceived caring in trauma patients. Nothing has been found in the literature on perceptions of caring by families in trauma, emergency, or intensive care situations.  This is an important gap in the knowledge base. It is recognized that most nurses working in a trauma setting do a good job of managing the physical aspects of care but are less comfortable in responding to the needs of highly stressed family members. More and more this is becoming a nursing responsibility as budget cuts have reduced social work and chaplain support programs. Methods: One hundred adult family members of moderately to severely injured trauma patients were contacted when they visited the patient in the hospital and were asked to participate. A modified version of the Caring Behaviors Inventory (Wolfe, 1084) was developed to focus on the family member's experience with the nurse. It consisted of 23 items rated on a Likert Scale of 1-3. Data collected on the instrument were triangulated with a qualitative arm of the study that used semi-structured interviews with a subset of the family members to establish validity.  Factor Analysis and Cronbach's alpha were done on the Inventory. Results: Family members rated the caring behaviors of the nurses very highly (M=2.8: range 1.91-3.0).  The lowest rated items were Assisting you to meet your religious or spiritual needs and Knowing your likes, dislikes, and routines. The highest rated items were Carefully listening to you, Helping you to feel at home, Helping you feel comfortable, and Being pleasant with you. The instrument had internal consistency with a Cronbach's alpha of .988. The findings were consistent with the qualitative arm that concluded family members perceive communication and positive interpersonal communication as being caring and abruptness as being non-caring. Implications: Family members of moderately to severely injured patients perceive nurses as caring and associate that with good communication about the patient. The modified Caring Behaviors Inventory is quick to use and is reliable and valid.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePerceptions of Nurse's Caring Behaviors by Family Members of Trauma Patientsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157749-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Perceptions of Nurse's Caring Behaviors by Family Members of Trauma Patients</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Hayes, Janice S., PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Northern Colorado, Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">6300 W. 4th Street Road, Greeley, CO, 80634, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">970-351-1690</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">janice.hayes@unco.edu, janice.hayes@comcast.net</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Lory Clukey, Associate Professor; Denise Curtis, Graduate Assistant; Alison Merrill, Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose/Aims: To assess perceptions of nurse's caring among adult family members of traumatically injured patients. Background: Nursing claims a fundamental moral commitment to caring.&nbsp; Some nursing theorists have posed that caring is the essence of nursing.&nbsp; Research on caring in trauma patients is minimal in the published literature. Research conducted on caring with injured and trauma patients have included patients that have fairly minor injuries leaving many questions about how caring is perceived in the more severely injured.&nbsp; This is the context of the current study of perceived caring in trauma patients. Nothing has been found in the literature on perceptions of caring by families in trauma, emergency, or intensive care situations.&nbsp; This is an important gap in the knowledge base. It is recognized that most nurses working in a trauma setting do a good job of managing the physical aspects of care but are less comfortable in responding to the needs of highly stressed family members. More and more this is becoming a nursing responsibility as budget cuts have reduced social work and chaplain support programs. Methods: One hundred adult family members of moderately to severely injured trauma patients were contacted when they visited the patient in the hospital and were asked to participate. A modified version of the Caring Behaviors Inventory (Wolfe, 1084) was developed to focus on the family member's experience with the nurse. It consisted of 23 items rated on a Likert Scale of 1-3. Data collected on the instrument were triangulated with a qualitative arm of the study that used semi-structured interviews with a subset of the family members to establish validity.&nbsp; Factor Analysis and Cronbach's alpha were done on the Inventory. Results: Family members rated the caring behaviors of the nurses very highly (M=2.8: range 1.91-3.0).&nbsp; The lowest rated items were Assisting you to meet your religious or spiritual needs and Knowing your likes, dislikes, and routines. The highest rated items were Carefully listening to you, Helping you to feel at home, Helping you feel comfortable, and Being pleasant with you. The instrument had internal consistency with a Cronbach's alpha of .988. The findings were consistent with the qualitative arm that concluded family members perceive communication and positive interpersonal communication as being caring and abruptness as being non-caring. Implications: Family members of moderately to severely injured patients perceive nurses as caring and associate that with good communication about the patient. The modified Caring Behaviors Inventory is quick to use and is reliable and valid.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:10:03Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:10:03Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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