Second Generation Latinas' Perceptions of Accessing Mental Health Care for Depression

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157750
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Second Generation Latinas' Perceptions of Accessing Mental Health Care for Depression
Abstract:
Second Generation Latinas' Perceptions of Accessing Mental Health Care for Depression
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2009
Author:Heilemann, MarySue V., RN, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of California, Los Angeles, School of Nursing
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:5-252 Factor Bldg, Box 956919, Los Angeles, CA, 90095-6919, USA
Contact Telephone:310-206-4735
Co-Authors:Katrina Dornig, MFT, PhDc; Huibrie Pieters, PhD, RN
Aim: The aim of this study was to explore and describe the perceptions of second generation Latinas of low income as they reflected upon their experiences of accessing and engaging in mental health care for depression. Background: Among Latinos, the lifetime rates for major depressive episode are two times higher for women than for men. Multiple studies have shown that second generation Latinas report more depressive symptoms than immigrants. However, help seeking efforts that result in formal mental health care for Latinos is quite low, even if they speak English or have insurance. As social stigma can act as a barrier to obtaining services, exploration and analysis of urban, low income Latinas? perceptions of their experiences accessing and engaging in depression treatment is crucial for understanding what prevents women from getting and completing needed mental health care. Method: Constructivist Grounded Theory (Charmaz, 2006) methodology guided collection and analysis of narrative data from eight second generation Latinas three months after they completed a unique nurse-led, community-based pilot project to treat depression called Project Well Being (PWB) (an eight week treatment program of Cognitive Therapy and Motivational Interviewing). Women were asked about their expectations about treatment before they started therapy, the factors that influenced their decision to enroll in PWB, and what made them stay in the program to its completion. Semi-structured interviews were conducted by a qualitative researcher (second author). Results: The process to get an appointment for an intake interview was fueled by internal motivators such as a strong desire to get better and stop feeling so poorly, courage to overcome stigma and fears that others would consider them "crazy," and a sense that they were building on efforts they were already making to help themselves. The fact that PWB was a study that held promise for helping other women in the long run was extremely meaningful and gave women an added reason to engage in treatment (i.e., it wasn't just for themselves, but to also benefit others). External cues from friends and family who noticed and pointed out that they needed "help" made women realize they needed to "do something." However, the dynamic of the relationship of the women with the therapist was described as central to their process, giving them confidence in themselves related to their ability to "do therapy" and to stay in the treatment program until the end. The women reported rich details of the characteristics of the therapist and the collaborative nature of the therapy as a compelling reason to stay in therapy. Implications: Insight from the experiences of Latinas themselves holds promise for creating services that are desirable and accessible for second generation Latinas who are depressed.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSecond Generation Latinas' Perceptions of Accessing Mental Health Care for Depressionen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157750-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Second Generation Latinas' Perceptions of Accessing Mental Health Care for Depression</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Heilemann, MarySue V., RN, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of California, Los Angeles, School of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">5-252 Factor Bldg, Box 956919, Los Angeles, CA, 90095-6919, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">310-206-4735</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">mheilema@sonnet.ucla.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Katrina Dornig, MFT, PhDc; Huibrie Pieters, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Aim: The aim of this study was to explore and describe the perceptions of second generation Latinas of low income as they reflected upon their experiences of accessing and engaging in mental health care for depression. Background: Among Latinos, the lifetime rates for major depressive episode are two times higher for women than for men. Multiple studies have shown that second generation Latinas report more depressive symptoms than immigrants. However, help seeking efforts that result in formal mental health care for Latinos is quite low, even if they speak English or have insurance. As social stigma can act as a barrier to obtaining services, exploration and analysis of urban, low income Latinas? perceptions of their experiences accessing and engaging in depression treatment is crucial for understanding what prevents women from getting and completing needed mental health care. Method: Constructivist Grounded Theory (Charmaz, 2006) methodology guided collection and analysis of narrative data from eight second generation Latinas three months after they completed a unique nurse-led, community-based pilot project to treat depression called Project Well Being (PWB) (an eight week treatment program of Cognitive Therapy and Motivational Interviewing). Women were asked about their expectations about treatment before they started therapy, the factors that influenced their decision to enroll in PWB, and what made them stay in the program to its completion. Semi-structured interviews were conducted by a qualitative researcher (second author). Results: The process to get an appointment for an intake interview was fueled by internal motivators such as a strong desire to get better and stop feeling so poorly, courage to overcome stigma and fears that others would consider them &quot;crazy,&quot; and a sense that they were building on efforts they were already making to help themselves. The fact that PWB was a study that held promise for helping other women in the long run was extremely meaningful and gave women an added reason to engage in treatment (i.e., it wasn't just for themselves, but to also benefit others). External cues from friends and family who noticed and pointed out that they needed &quot;help&quot; made women realize they needed to &quot;do something.&quot; However, the dynamic of the relationship of the women with the therapist was described as central to their process, giving them confidence in themselves related to their ability to &quot;do therapy&quot; and to stay in the treatment program until the end. The women reported rich details of the characteristics of the therapist and the collaborative nature of the therapy as a compelling reason to stay in therapy. Implications: Insight from the experiences of Latinas themselves holds promise for creating services that are desirable and accessible for second generation Latinas who are depressed.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:10:07Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:10:07Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.