Nursing Student Perceptions of Reflective Journaling: A Conjoint Value Analysis

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157751
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Nursing Student Perceptions of Reflective Journaling: A Conjoint Value Analysis
Abstract:
Nursing Student Perceptions of Reflective Journaling: A Conjoint Value Analysis
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2009
Author:Hendrix, Thomas J., PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Alaska Anchorage, School of Nursing
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:3211 Providence Drive, Anchorage, AK, 99508, USA
Contact Telephone:907-622-3379
Co-Authors:Bernice Carmen, Associate Professor; Maureen O'Malley, PhD, Assistant Professor, Catherine Sullivan, Assistant Professor
Purposes/Aims:  The purposes of the study were to determine a) the critical attributes of reflective journals and b) the relative importance of each attribute as perceived by students as a whole and to specific demographic subgroups and c) specify how these attributes could be changed to maximize student perception of the value of reflective journaling. Rationale/Conceptual Basis/Background: Reflection is growing in importance as a means to promote a learner-centered environment, where the learner is encouraged to learn through practice. Previous studies show that many students value reflective journals, but that this is not consistent for all students. Although there have been efforts to determine the level of reflection in a journal, no study has systematically analyzed the perceptions of students related to learning through reflective journals. This study begins to fill that void. Methods: Conjoint analysis is a market-based research analysis model where customers make choices based on their preferences. These choices are based on the individual attributes of the product under consideration and are considered jointly (conjoint). The attributes of reflective journaling identified for this project are a) time, b) confidentiality, c) format, d) feedback and e) student result. Each attribute was then given three levels. For example time could be 15, 30, or 45 minutes. After IRB approval, 56 nursing students were given a 20 question survey. Each question presented students with a choice of two journaling experiences from which they had to choose one (Likert scale).  Preference is calculated by performing simultaneous regressions of the five independent attribute variables. Marketing Simulation software then takes the attribute preference data and filters it through demographics and provides a result containing preference shares and standard errors. Confidence intervals and p-values (Z scores) were then calculated. Results: The model was robust and explained 78% of the variability of student preferences.  All results were significant at the 0.05 level. Students prefer less time and their satisfaction increases 36% if time is reduced from 45 to 30 minutes. Students prefer confidentiality and their satisfaction increases by at least 26% through assured confidentiality.  Students expect results in their behavior and their satisfaction increases by 40% if they perceive positive changes in their behavior. Students prefer one-time comprehensive instructor feedback and their satisfaction increases 11% when they receive it. Students do not prefer a structured format and their satisfaction increases 10% by moving to open formats. Less experienced students preferred less time and more structure and more experienced students preferred more time and less structure.  Finally, the "English as a second language" (ESL) students had completely different (statistically significant) preferences then non-ESL students in two areas. All students wanted their behavior changed but ESL students wanted it to a greater degree and ESL students did not want instructor feedback. Implications: By understanding what their customers' (students) value, nursing instructors can better tailor reflective journaling requirements to maximize the perceived value of journaling while simultaneously adjusting those requirements to better serve increasingly diverse student populations, especially ESL students.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleNursing Student Perceptions of Reflective Journaling: A Conjoint Value Analysisen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157751-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Nursing Student Perceptions of Reflective Journaling: A Conjoint Value Analysis</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Hendrix, Thomas J., PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Alaska Anchorage, School of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">3211 Providence Drive, Anchorage, AK, 99508, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">907-622-3379</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">tjh@mtaonline.net</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Bernice Carmen, Associate Professor; Maureen O'Malley, PhD, Assistant Professor, Catherine Sullivan, Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purposes/Aims:&nbsp; The purposes of the study were to determine a) the critical attributes of reflective journals and b) the relative importance of each attribute as perceived by students as a whole and to specific demographic subgroups and c) specify how these attributes could be changed to maximize student perception of the value of reflective journaling. Rationale/Conceptual Basis/Background: Reflection is growing in importance as a means to promote a learner-centered environment, where the learner is encouraged to learn through practice. Previous studies show that many students value reflective journals, but that this is not consistent for all students. Although there have been efforts to determine the level of reflection in a journal, no study has systematically analyzed the perceptions of students related to learning through reflective journals.&nbsp;This study begins to fill that void. Methods: Conjoint analysis is a market-based research analysis model where customers make choices based on their preferences.&nbsp;These choices are based on the individual attributes of the product under consideration and are considered jointly (conjoint).&nbsp;The attributes of reflective journaling identified for this project are a) time, b) confidentiality, c) format, d) feedback and e) student result. Each attribute was then given three levels. For example time could be 15, 30, or 45 minutes. After IRB approval, 56 nursing students were given a 20 question survey.&nbsp;Each question presented students with a choice of two journaling experiences from which they had to choose one (Likert scale).&nbsp; Preference is calculated by performing simultaneous regressions of the five independent attribute variables.&nbsp;Marketing Simulation software then takes the attribute preference data and filters it through demographics and provides a result containing preference shares and standard errors.&nbsp;Confidence intervals and p-values (Z scores) were then calculated. Results:&nbsp;The model was robust and explained 78% of the variability of student preferences.&nbsp; All results were significant at the 0.05 level. Students prefer less time and their satisfaction increases 36% if time is reduced from 45 to 30 minutes.&nbsp;Students prefer confidentiality and their satisfaction increases by at least 26% through assured confidentiality.&nbsp; Students expect results in their behavior and their satisfaction increases by 40% if they perceive positive changes in their behavior. Students prefer one-time comprehensive instructor feedback and their satisfaction increases 11% when they receive it.&nbsp;Students do not prefer a structured format and their satisfaction increases 10% by moving to open formats.&nbsp;Less experienced students preferred less time and more structure and more experienced students preferred more time and less structure.&nbsp; Finally, the &quot;English as a second language&quot; (ESL) students had completely different (statistically significant) preferences then non-ESL students in two areas.&nbsp;All students wanted their behavior changed but ESL students wanted it to a greater degree and ESL students did not want instructor feedback. Implications: By understanding what their customers' (students) value, nursing instructors can better tailor reflective journaling requirements to maximize the perceived value of journaling while simultaneously adjusting those requirements to better serve increasingly diverse student populations, especially ESL students.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:10:10Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:10:10Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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