2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157752
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Whole Blood Measures of Platelet Activation, Aggregation, and Coagulation
Abstract:
Whole Blood Measures of Platelet Activation, Aggregation, and Coagulation
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2009
Author:Henry, Melissa L. M., PhD, RN, FNP
P.I. Institution Name:University of Northern Colorado, School of Nursing
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:Office 3290 Gunter Hall, Greeley, CO, 80639, USA
Contact Telephone:970-351-1735
Co-Authors:Leslie S. Ritter, PhD, RN, Associate Professor
Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to discuss our experiences with the use and development of three whole blood assays, analyzing platelet function and coagulation. Data from our laboratory examining platelet function in obese, type 2 diabetic mouse models will be presented as an example of potential use of these methods. Background: Many diseases are associated with alterations in platelet function. Our laboratory is especially interested in the contributions of the known platelet dysfunction and subsequent hypercoagulability observed in obese and type 2 diabetic patients on the increased morbidity and mortality after an ischemic stroke. Several in vitro assays to study platelets are available, however many use isolation techniques that are known to cause artifactual platelet activation and examine platelets in isolation. Alternatively, in vivo methods, such as ferric chloride thrombus formation, are used in rodent models to examine platelets and coagulation in an optimal physiologic environment (in the presence of other blood and endothelial cells), but these methods are difficult to reproduce and are not clinically relevant. Therefore, we developed and modified three in vitro whole blood assays to examine platelet function and coagulation, which are clinically applicable, easy to use, reduce the amount of artifactual platelet activation by eliminating isolation procedures, and provide a physiologic milieu of blood cells and plasma known to be involved in normal platelet aggregation and function. Methods: To analyze the effects of platelet alterations in obesity and type 2 diabetes, we measured platelet activation and coagulation using whole blood aggregometry, thromboelastography, and flow cytometry. Whole blood aggregometry was used to measure platelet aggregation in response to the platelet agonist adenosine diphosphate (ADP). Thromboelastography was used to measure platelet aggregation, coagulation, and fibrinolysis in response to agitation for 30 minutes. Flow cytometry was used to quantify the expression of surface proteins known to be increased during platelet activation, CD61 (glycoprotein IIb/IIa), and CD62P (p-selectin). Results: Similar to in vivo measures of coagulation, but different from previous platelet isolation assays, we found that mouse models of obesity and type 2 diabetes do not demonstrate the platelet activation or hypercoagulability observed in people with these disorders. Our results support the use of whole blood methods for analyzing platelets in vitro and are consistent with in vivo measures of platelet aggregation and coagulation. Conclusions: Overall, the whole blood assays presented offer several advantages for studying platelet aggregation and coagulation, including their ease of use and relatively low cost, and could easily be integrated into nursing research examining these physiologic processes.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleWhole Blood Measures of Platelet Activation, Aggregation, and Coagulationen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157752-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Whole Blood Measures of Platelet Activation, Aggregation, and Coagulation</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Henry, Melissa L. M., PhD, RN, FNP</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Northern Colorado, School of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Office 3290 Gunter Hall, Greeley, CO, 80639, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">970-351-1735</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">melissa.henry@unco.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Leslie S. Ritter, PhD, RN, Associate Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to discuss our experiences with the use and development of three whole blood assays, analyzing platelet function and coagulation. Data from our laboratory examining platelet function in obese, type 2 diabetic mouse models will be presented as an example of potential use of these methods. Background: Many diseases are associated with alterations in platelet function. Our laboratory is especially interested in the contributions of the known platelet dysfunction and subsequent hypercoagulability observed in obese and type 2 diabetic patients on the increased morbidity and mortality after an ischemic stroke. Several in vitro assays to study platelets are available, however many use isolation techniques that are known to cause artifactual platelet activation and examine platelets in isolation. Alternatively, in vivo methods, such as ferric chloride thrombus formation, are used in rodent models to examine platelets and coagulation in an optimal physiologic environment (in the presence of other blood and endothelial cells), but these methods are difficult to reproduce and are not clinically relevant. Therefore, we developed and modified three in vitro whole blood assays to examine platelet function and coagulation, which are clinically applicable, easy to use, reduce the amount of artifactual platelet activation by eliminating isolation procedures, and provide a physiologic milieu of blood cells and plasma known to be involved in normal platelet aggregation and function. Methods: To analyze the effects of platelet alterations in obesity and type 2 diabetes, we measured platelet activation and coagulation using whole blood aggregometry, thromboelastography, and flow cytometry. Whole blood aggregometry was used to measure platelet aggregation in response to the platelet agonist adenosine diphosphate (ADP). Thromboelastography was used to measure platelet aggregation, coagulation, and fibrinolysis in response to agitation for 30 minutes. Flow cytometry was used to quantify the expression of surface proteins known to be increased during platelet activation, CD61 (glycoprotein IIb/IIa), and CD62P (p-selectin). Results: Similar to in vivo measures of coagulation, but different from previous platelet isolation assays, we found that mouse models of obesity and type 2 diabetes do not demonstrate the platelet activation or hypercoagulability observed in people with these disorders. Our results support the use of whole blood methods for analyzing platelets in vitro and are consistent with in vivo measures of platelet aggregation and coagulation. Conclusions: Overall, the whole blood assays presented offer several advantages for studying platelet aggregation and coagulation, including their ease of use and relatively low cost, and could easily be integrated into nursing research examining these physiologic processes.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:10:14Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:10:14Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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