2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157755
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Simulation Laboratory Development: Existing Technologies to State of the Art
Abstract:
Simulation Laboratory Development: Existing Technologies to State of the Art
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2009
Author:Hewett, Beverly J., RN, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Idaho State University, School of Nursing
Title:Assistant Clinical Professor and LRC Coordinator
Contact Address:921 S 8th, Stop 8101, Pocatello, ID, 83209, USA
Contact Telephone:208-282-2182
Purpose: This presentation will share our experiences in evaluating and improving the actual physical elements, or critical ?Input? of our Capacity Building for Simulation Sustainability model. The technological ?Input? for our model obviously impacted all aspects of ?Throughput? and ?Output? as we progressed with development of our simulation laboratory. Background: In the current health care climate there is a national decrease in access to traditional clinical sites for health care students. This atmosphere contributes to a challenging situation when nursing faculty attempt to provide students with the experiences needed to develop nursing competencies needed to merge with the workforce (1, 2). Our faculty and administration felt strongly that through the use of state of the art simulation experiences we could assist our students to develop and reach competencies needed for entry into the workforce. Administrative support for simulation development was and is strong. Our laboratory director took a leading role in evaluating existing resources, and identifying needed resources for development of simulation activities. Process: Initial ?Input? for our Capacity Building for Simulation Sustainability model included a thorough evaluation of our existing resources including low and high fidelity technologies. Faculty, administration and community members then worked together to determine additional technologies and design a ?state of the art? simulation facility. We sought and obtained both internal and external funding resources. The simulation lab was conceptualized and designed using ?Input? from faculty, administration, students and the community. Outcomes: Our simulation laboratory is scheduled to open in January of 2009. Faculty and community input into the structure of the lab served as ?input? into our conceptual model and increased collaborative and organizational relationships. Feedback from faculty while the lab developed and once the lab opens will serve to strengthen our pedagogical infrastructure, or ?Throughput,? as well as our community relationships. Recommendations and Conclusions: With the opening of our simulation laboratory, we will continue to use faculty and community input. We will further monitor and measure output, and obtain feedback per our model to develop the technological capacity and pedagogical outcomes of our simulation laboratory. Increasing both community involvement and collaborative relationships will assist with economic feedback into our laboratory and increase sustainability.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSimulation Laboratory Development: Existing Technologies to State of the Arten_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157755-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Simulation Laboratory Development: Existing Technologies to State of the Art</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Hewett, Beverly J., RN, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Idaho State University, School of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Clinical Professor and LRC Coordinator</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">921 S 8th, Stop 8101, Pocatello, ID, 83209, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">208-282-2182</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">hewebeve@isu.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: This presentation will share our experiences in evaluating and improving the actual physical elements, or critical ?Input? of our Capacity Building for Simulation Sustainability model. The technological ?Input? for our model obviously impacted all aspects of ?Throughput? and ?Output? as we progressed with development of our simulation laboratory. Background: In the current health care climate there is a national decrease in access to traditional clinical sites for health care students. This atmosphere contributes to a challenging situation when nursing faculty attempt to provide students with the experiences needed to develop nursing competencies needed to merge with the workforce (1, 2). Our faculty and administration felt strongly that through the use of state of the art simulation experiences we could assist our students to develop and reach competencies needed for entry into the workforce. Administrative support for simulation development was and is strong. Our laboratory director took a leading role in evaluating existing resources, and identifying needed resources for development of simulation activities. Process: Initial ?Input? for our Capacity Building for Simulation Sustainability model included a thorough evaluation of our existing resources including low and high fidelity technologies. Faculty, administration and community members then worked together to determine additional technologies and design a ?state of the art? simulation facility. We sought and obtained both internal and external funding resources. The simulation lab was conceptualized and designed using ?Input? from faculty, administration, students and the community. Outcomes: Our simulation laboratory is scheduled to open in January of 2009. Faculty and community input into the structure of the lab served as ?input? into our conceptual model and increased collaborative and organizational relationships. Feedback from faculty while the lab developed and once the lab opens will serve to strengthen our pedagogical infrastructure, or ?Throughput,? as well as our community relationships. Recommendations and Conclusions: With the opening of our simulation laboratory, we will continue to use faculty and community input. We will further monitor and measure output, and obtain feedback per our model to develop the technological capacity and pedagogical outcomes of our simulation laboratory. Increasing both community involvement and collaborative relationships will assist with economic feedback into our laboratory and increase sustainability.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:10:25Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:10:25Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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