2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157758
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Randomized Preference Design: Tailoring Learning Preferences
Abstract:
The Randomized Preference Design: Tailoring Learning Preferences
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2009
Author:Honea, Norissa J., PhD(candidate), MSN, RN, AOCN, C
P.I. Institution Name:Arizona Oncology Services (AOS) Foundation
Title:Clinical Research Nurse/Coordinator
Contact Address:300 West Clarendon Avenue, Suite 350, Phoenix, AZ, 85013, USA
Contact Telephone:(602) 240-3379
Co-Authors:Susan Beck, PhD, APRN, FAAN, Professor; Michael Caserta, PhD, Professor; Terry Thomas, MS, Site Investigator; Gail L. Towsley, PhD, Assistant Professor
Purpose: The purpose of this presentation is to provide an overview of an exploratory clinical trial which uses an experimental "randomized preference design" to test a symptom management intervention in older men with prostate cancer receiving radiation therapy. Background and Rationale: The patient preference design, in which patients can choose treatment options, has been primarily used in regards to medical treatment. This design is ideal in educational/behavioral interventions that require a high degree of patient motivation and participation. We applied this design to a clinical trial where men who are randomized to the treatment condition can choose their preferred way of learning self-care strategies to ameliorate their symptoms. Research Issue: This intervention is based on theory and data that indicate that older adults have a preferred way of learning. Tailoring the teaching method to learning preference can enhance the efficacy and acceptability of an intervention. Each participant in the intervention chooses from three ways of learning: (1) a self-directed approach that includes written materials and internet resources; (2) group-facilitated learning, a conference call approach that applies concepts of social learning theory; and (3) one-on-one counseling, an individualized approach provided by an advanced practice oncology nurse. Participants are randomly assigned to two study groups in a 2:1 ratio: (1) the tailored symptom management intervention which allows patients to choose their preferred learning method (n=72) or (2) usual care (n=36). The projected sample and the unbalanced design maximize the number of participants in the intervention group, allowing more experience with each preferred learning method and still providing an adequate control group for a pilot study. Conclusions and Implications: This design provides a unique approach that can guide other types of tailored intervention studies. Lessons from the pilot study will inform issues to be considered in a larger randomized clinical trial in which the randomization schema is usually extended to compare a preference group to a traditionally randomized group. This study is one of few oncology nursing trials to utilize the randomized preference design. Potential challenges in implementation and strategies for success will be useful to other scientists and students.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Randomized Preference Design: Tailoring Learning Preferencesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157758-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Randomized Preference Design: Tailoring Learning Preferences</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Honea, Norissa J., PhD(candidate), MSN, RN, AOCN, C</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Arizona Oncology Services (AOS) Foundation</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Clinical Research Nurse/Coordinator</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">300 West Clarendon Avenue, Suite 350, Phoenix, AZ, 85013, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">(602) 240-3379</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">norissa@azoncology.com</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Susan Beck, PhD, APRN, FAAN, Professor; Michael Caserta, PhD, Professor; Terry Thomas, MS, Site Investigator; Gail L. Towsley, PhD, Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: The purpose of this presentation is to provide an overview of an exploratory clinical trial which uses an experimental &quot;randomized preference design&quot; to test a symptom management intervention in older men with prostate cancer receiving radiation therapy. Background and Rationale: The patient preference design, in which patients can choose treatment options, has been primarily used in regards to medical treatment. This design is ideal in educational/behavioral interventions that require a high degree of patient motivation and participation. We applied this design to a clinical trial where men who are randomized to the treatment condition can choose their preferred way of learning self-care strategies to ameliorate their symptoms. Research Issue: This intervention is based on theory and data that indicate that older adults have a preferred way of learning. Tailoring the teaching method to learning preference can enhance the efficacy and acceptability of an intervention. Each participant in the intervention chooses from three ways of learning: (1) a self-directed approach that includes written materials and internet resources; (2) group-facilitated learning, a conference call approach that applies concepts of social learning theory; and (3) one-on-one counseling, an individualized approach provided by an advanced practice oncology nurse. Participants are randomly assigned to two study groups in a 2:1 ratio: (1) the tailored symptom management intervention which allows patients to choose their preferred learning method (n=72) or (2) usual care (n=36). The projected sample and the unbalanced design maximize the number of participants in the intervention group, allowing more experience with each preferred learning method and still providing an adequate control group for a pilot study. Conclusions and Implications: This design provides a unique approach that can guide other types of tailored intervention studies. Lessons from the pilot study will inform issues to be considered in a larger randomized clinical trial in which the randomization schema is usually extended to compare a preference group to a traditionally randomized group. This study is one of few oncology nursing trials to utilize the randomized preference design. Potential challenges in implementation and strategies for success will be useful to other scientists and students.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:10:35Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:10:35Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.