A Homeless Tent City: Expansion of Turbulence After Recommended Research Team Proposals Not Implemented

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157759
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A Homeless Tent City: Expansion of Turbulence After Recommended Research Team Proposals Not Implemented
Abstract:
A Homeless Tent City: Expansion of Turbulence After Recommended Research Team Proposals Not Implemented
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2009
Author:Hubbert, Ann, PhD, RN, CTN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Nevada, Reno, Nursing
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:4186 Pillary CT, Sparks, NC, 89436, USA
Contact Telephone:775-626-8584
Co-Authors:Fred Steinmann, MS, Doctoral Student
Purpose: The purpose of this presentation is the exploration and application of the concept,  "societal turbulence," often referred to in public administration literature and research, as it applies to  issues of homelessness within a Northern Nevada community. The concept of Turbulence has not commonly been used to address issues that impact public health and healthcare services, but is regarded by the authors as a crucial concept to address the academic-community partnership collaborations to conduct research, education, and services for public health and/or healthcare issues. The concept is examined as providing insight into one community's dramatic events within the homeless population after the authors' earlier research team's recommendations for best practices of homeless services were not implemented. Definition of Concept: The concept of Turbulence (Kettl, 2006; Newland, 2008) within society is defined as having three components: (1) the situations involved "defy definitions"; (2) the situations are perpetual; and (3) any resolution requires "pooled resources," acknowledging that no one system can solve them and there is no one solution. The examination of turbulence is applied to consequences of societal actions that could go in two distinct directions: (1) innovative, creative organizations are formed, or (2) there can have destructive, demoralizing, and costly outcomes for society.  There are "3 Puzzles" within the Turbulence concept: (1) wicked problems, (2) messy boundaries, and (3) depleted intellectual capital. Approach: The authors were members of an inter-professional research team that completed a federally and county funded study (Bartholet et al, 2007) on the extent and costs of homelessness, including the cost effectives of services and housing within their community. Turbulence and the "3 Puzzles" become paramount in describing what happened within the community one year after the research findings were disseminated. The evidence based research recommendations had not been implemented, but the adverse community events of homeless individuals creating their own tent city, initially without any supervision or support services (Reno-Gazette Journal, 2008) did occur, accompanied by prolific media attention. The events are examined as components of the Turbulence concept. Outcomes: The original team's research recommendations had been presented to the state legislature, county and city governments, community service providers, one year earlier and professional dissemination (Hubbert & Steinmann, 2008) had begun. However, no implementations of the recommendations were in progress in spring 2008, when the dramatic events of Turbulence expanded among the community's homeless population. Conclusions: The research evidence and recommendations for a community's adoption of best practices of homeless services had been a costly study, but recommendations were not implemented, and there was an explosive emergence of complexities within the Turbulence concept. Insights and understanding gained by the research team are discussed for their implications in public health and/or healthcare services research, education, or services. In conclusion, the value of the inclusion of public policy/administration, and economics partners is emphasized for public health and healthcare future policies and programs!
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleA Homeless Tent City: Expansion of Turbulence After Recommended Research Team Proposals Not Implementeden_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157759-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">A Homeless Tent City: Expansion of Turbulence After Recommended Research Team Proposals Not Implemented</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Hubbert, Ann, PhD, RN, CTN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Nevada, Reno, Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">4186 Pillary CT, Sparks, NC, 89436, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">775-626-8584</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">anno626@sbcglobal.net, ahubbert@unr.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Fred Steinmann, MS, Doctoral Student</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: The purpose of this presentation is the exploration and application of the concept, &nbsp;&quot;societal turbulence,&quot; often referred to in public administration literature and research, as it applies to &nbsp;issues of homelessness within a Northern Nevada community. The concept of Turbulence has not commonly been used to address issues that impact public health and healthcare services, but is regarded by the authors as a crucial concept to address the academic-community partnership collaborations to conduct research, education, and services for public health and/or healthcare issues. The concept is examined as providing insight into one community's dramatic events within the homeless population after the authors' earlier research team's recommendations for best practices of homeless services were not implemented. Definition of Concept: The concept of Turbulence (Kettl, 2006; Newland, 2008) within society is defined as having three components: (1) the situations involved &quot;defy definitions&quot;; (2) the situations are perpetual; and (3) any resolution requires &quot;pooled resources,&quot; acknowledging that no one system can solve them and there is no one solution. The examination of turbulence is applied to consequences of societal actions that could go in two distinct directions: (1) innovative, creative organizations are formed, or (2) there can have destructive, demoralizing, and costly outcomes for society.&nbsp; There are &quot;3 Puzzles&quot; within the Turbulence concept: (1) wicked problems, (2) messy boundaries, and (3) depleted intellectual capital. Approach: The authors were members of an inter-professional research team that completed a federally and county funded study (Bartholet et al, 2007) on the extent and costs of homelessness, including the cost effectives of services and housing within their community. Turbulence and the &quot;3 Puzzles&quot; become paramount in describing what happened within the community one year after the research findings were disseminated. The evidence based research recommendations had not been implemented, but the adverse community events of homeless individuals creating their own tent city, initially without any supervision or support services (Reno-Gazette Journal, 2008) did occur, accompanied by prolific media attention. The events are examined as components of the Turbulence concept. Outcomes: The original team's research recommendations had been presented to the state legislature, county and city governments, community service providers, one year earlier and professional dissemination (Hubbert &amp; Steinmann, 2008) had begun. However, no implementations of the recommendations were in progress in spring 2008, when the dramatic events of Turbulence expanded among the community's homeless population. Conclusions: The research evidence and recommendations for a community's adoption of best practices of homeless services had been a costly study, but recommendations were not implemented, and there was an explosive emergence of complexities within the Turbulence concept. Insights and understanding gained by the research team are discussed for their implications in public health and/or healthcare services research, education, or services. In conclusion, the value of the inclusion of public policy/administration, and economics partners is emphasized for public health and healthcare future policies and programs!</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:10:38Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:10:38Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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