Correlates of Healthy lifestyles, Perceived Difficulty, Attitudes, Beliefs, and Choices

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157761
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Correlates of Healthy lifestyles, Perceived Difficulty, Attitudes, Beliefs, and Choices
Abstract:
Correlates of Healthy lifestyles, Perceived Difficulty, Attitudes, Beliefs, and Choices
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2009
Author:Jacobson, Diana, MS, RN, CPNP
P.I. Institution Name:Arizona State University, College of Nursing and Healthcare Innovation
Title:Doctoral Candidate
Contact Address:500 N 3rd Street, Phoenix, AZ, 85004, USA
Contact Telephone:602-496-0863
Co-Authors:Stephanie Kelly, MS, RN, FNP-C, Doctoral Student; Mary Mays, PhD, Associate Professor; Bernadette Melnyk, PhD, RN, CPNP/NPP, FAAN, FNAP, Dean; Judith O'Haver, PhD, RN, CPNP, Assistant Professor
Purpose: The purpose of this descriptive correlational study was to assess the relationships among the key variables of adolescents' perceived difficulty in leading a healthy lifestyle, healthy lifestyle beliefs, healthy lifestyle attitudes, and healthy lifestyle choices. Background: The risk for overweight and obesity continues to be a significant concern in the adolescent population. Overweight and obesity in adolescence is associated with mental health problems including depression, lower self-esteem, and lower health-related quality of life. Obese adolescents are at high risk for obesity in adulthood with resultant comorbidities of diabetes and heart disease. Methods: A descriptive correlational design was used with a convenience sample of 404 high school students who ranged in age from 13.5 to 18 years, with a mean of 15.1 years. The participants were sampled from required health/physical education classes in two high schools within the same school district located in the Southwest region of the United States. Results: Students were predominately freshman (89.1%) with 212 females (52.5%) and 192 males (47.5%). African Americans represented 3.2% of the sample, Hispanics 16.6%, Asians 5.0%, American Indians 3.0%, Caucasians 65.3%, and Other 6.9%. Cross sectional data were collected using: (a) the Healthy Lifestyle Choices Scale for Teens, a 16 item scale that assesses intentions to make healthy lifestyle choices (Cronbach's alpha =.92); (b) the Healthy Living Attitude Scale for Teens, a 14 item scale that assesses teens' attitudes toward living a healthy lifestyle (Cronbach's alpha = .85); (c) the Healthy Lifestyles Beliefs Scale for Teens, a 16 item scale that assesses one's belief in ability to live a healthy lifestyle (Cronbach's alpha = .94); and the Perceived Difficulty Scale for Teens, a 12 item scale that assesses perceived difficulty in living a healthy lifestyle (Cronbach's alpha = .89). Overall, teens with greater perceived difficulty in engaging in a healthy lifestyle reported less ability to make healthy choices (-.545, p < .01), more negative attitudes about healthy lifestyles (-.32, p < .01), and less belief in their ability to lead a healthy lifestyle (-.48, p < .01). Teens' intention to make healthy choices correlated positively with their attitudes (.45, p < .01) and beliefs (.54, p < .01). Implications: Teens with higher perceived difficulty in engaging in a healthy lifestyle reported less healthy attitudes, beliefs, and choices. Cognitive Theory posits that an individual's thoughts, feelings, and behaviors are interdependent. Interventions that target improving healthy lifestyles in adolescents should include cognitive behavioral skills building components such as goal setting, problem solving, and cognitive restructuring of negative thoughts and attitudes.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCorrelates of Healthy lifestyles, Perceived Difficulty, Attitudes, Beliefs, and Choicesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157761-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Correlates of Healthy lifestyles, Perceived Difficulty, Attitudes, Beliefs, and Choices</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Jacobson, Diana, MS, RN, CPNP</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Arizona State University, College of Nursing and Healthcare Innovation</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Doctoral Candidate</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">500 N 3rd Street, Phoenix, AZ, 85004, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">602-496-0863</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">diana.jacobson@asu.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Stephanie Kelly, MS, RN, FNP-C, Doctoral Student; Mary Mays, PhD, Associate Professor; Bernadette Melnyk, PhD, RN, CPNP/NPP, FAAN, FNAP, Dean; Judith O'Haver, PhD, RN, CPNP, Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: The purpose of this descriptive correlational study was to assess the relationships among the key variables of adolescents' perceived difficulty in leading a healthy lifestyle, healthy lifestyle beliefs, healthy lifestyle attitudes, and healthy lifestyle choices. Background: The risk for overweight and obesity continues to be a significant concern in the adolescent population. Overweight and obesity in adolescence is associated with mental health problems including depression, lower self-esteem, and lower health-related quality of life. Obese adolescents are at high risk for obesity in adulthood with resultant comorbidities of diabetes and heart disease. Methods: A descriptive correlational design was used with a convenience sample of 404 high school students who ranged in age from 13.5 to 18 years, with a mean of 15.1 years. The participants were sampled from required health/physical education classes in two high schools within the same school district located in the Southwest region of the United States. Results: Students were predominately freshman (89.1%) with 212 females (52.5%) and 192 males (47.5%). African Americans represented 3.2% of the sample, Hispanics 16.6%, Asians 5.0%, American Indians 3.0%, Caucasians 65.3%, and Other 6.9%. Cross sectional data were collected using: (a) the Healthy Lifestyle Choices Scale for Teens, a 16 item scale that assesses intentions to make healthy lifestyle choices (Cronbach's alpha =.92); (b) the Healthy Living Attitude Scale for Teens, a 14 item scale that assesses teens' attitudes toward living a healthy lifestyle (Cronbach's alpha = .85); (c) the Healthy Lifestyles Beliefs Scale for Teens, a 16 item scale that assesses one's belief in ability to live a healthy lifestyle (Cronbach's alpha = .94); and the Perceived Difficulty Scale for Teens, a 12 item scale that assesses perceived difficulty in living a healthy lifestyle (Cronbach's alpha = .89). Overall, teens with greater perceived difficulty in engaging in a healthy lifestyle reported less ability to make healthy choices (-.545, p &lt; .01), more negative attitudes about healthy lifestyles (-.32, p &lt; .01), and less belief in their ability to lead a healthy lifestyle (-.48, p &lt; .01). Teens' intention to make healthy choices correlated positively with their attitudes (.45, p &lt; .01) and beliefs (.54, p &lt; .01). Implications: Teens with higher perceived difficulty in engaging in a healthy lifestyle reported less healthy attitudes, beliefs, and choices. Cognitive Theory posits that an individual's thoughts, feelings, and behaviors are interdependent. Interventions that target improving healthy lifestyles in adolescents should include cognitive behavioral skills building components such as goal setting, problem solving, and cognitive restructuring of negative thoughts and attitudes.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:10:45Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:10:45Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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