2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157763
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Northern British Columbian Aboriginal Mothers: Raising Adolescents With FASD
Abstract:
Northern British Columbian Aboriginal Mothers: Raising Adolescents With FASD
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2009
Author:Johnston, Mary Suzanne, RN, MN, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Northern Health, Administration
Title:Vice President Academic & Chief Nursing Officer
Contact Address:7151 St Barbara Place, Prince George, BC, V2N 4Y4, Canada
Contact Telephone:250-961-9805
Co-Authors:Joyceen Boyle, RN, PhD, FAAN, Dissertation Chair
Purpose: The purpose of this interpretive ethnography was to gain an understanding of the beliefs and practices of Aboriginal mothers in as they promoted the well-being of their adolescent children who have Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD). Background: Northern British Columbian Aboriginal mothers raising adolescents with FASD face many challenges. FASD is a major health concern for Aboriginal people. "There is consensus among scientific researchers, medical and social service professionals, paraprofessionals, and lay persons that FASD is one-hundred percent preventable" (Tait, 2003, p.121). Despite this, the incidence of FASD continues to rise. Experts agree that accurately estimating the prevalence of FASD-affected children is difficult. Factors that may explain this include inadequate diagnostic capacity for FASD, inadequate access to professionals with the required skill sets, studies that are not representative of populations and sub-populations, and a lack of comparability among studies (Chudley, Conry, Loock, & LeBlanc, 2005). In, it is thought that the incidence ranges between 1 and 9 cases in 1,000 live births (Stade, Ungar, Stevens, Beyanne, & Koren, 2006). In some Aboriginal communities in northern, estimated rates of FASD are significantly higher than the national average, ranging between 25 and 200 cases per 1,000 live births (Caley, 2006; Chudley et al., 2005). Notably, research describing incidence rates among Aboriginal people is limited and there are questions about accuracy (Tait, 2003). To date, existing studies on FASD have focused on diagnosis, etiology, and strategies for prevention. Despite the high incidence and the overwhelming impact of FASD, research has not focused on the subjective experiences of Aboriginal women mothering children with FASD. Conceptual Basis: The concepts of vulnerability, marginalization, and mothering, conceptualized within the theoretical perspectives of post colonialism, provided the framework for this study. Postcolonial perspectives were particularly relevant to this research: the explicit aftereffects of colonialism on the well-being of Aboriginal women have shaped the worldview of mainstream society resulting in marginalization and stigmatization. A postcolonial perspective suggests that FASD is a problem compounded by colonization; until the underlying compounding issues are addressed, the incidence of FASD among Aboriginal people will continue to increase. Methods: An interpretive ethnography was conducted with English-speaking Aboriginal women with one or more children between the ages of 14 and 18 years affected by FASD. Data collection included three sequential audio-recorded interviews with eight women over a specific time. Interview data were enhanced by document review, intervals of observation participation, and the examination of other historically and culturally relevant data. Results: The interpretive theory derived from the data, Mothering from the Margins, explains how Aboriginal mothers raise their adolescent children who have FASD. The theory provides a perspective that enables nurses to view mothers with adolescents affected by FASD in an all-encompassing manner, and unifies the experiences of participants mothering adolescents with FASD. Aboriginal mothers of adolescents with FASD continue to experience societal blame and marginalization for consuming alcohol during pregnancy. Implications: This study extends the knowledge of how this blaming and marginalization experience plays out in the lives of both mothers and children. The findings debunk the stereotypical myth that Aboriginal mothers are not good mothers. In fact, the findings from this study demonstrate how, despite all the difficulties and challenges faced by study participants, they have demonstrated adaptability, confidence, and care in their mothering roles.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleNorthern British Columbian Aboriginal Mothers: Raising Adolescents With FASDen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157763-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Northern British Columbian Aboriginal Mothers: Raising Adolescents With FASD</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Johnston, Mary Suzanne, RN, MN, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Northern Health, Administration</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Vice President Academic &amp; Chief Nursing Officer</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">7151 St Barbara Place, Prince George, BC, V2N 4Y4, Canada</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">250-961-9805</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">mjohnston@nursing.arizona.edu, suzanne.johnston@no</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Joyceen Boyle, RN, PhD, FAAN, Dissertation Chair</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: The purpose of this interpretive ethnography was to gain an understanding of the beliefs and practices of Aboriginal mothers in as they promoted the well-being of their adolescent children who have Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD). Background: Northern British Columbian Aboriginal mothers raising adolescents with FASD face many challenges. FASD is a major health concern for Aboriginal people. &quot;There is consensus among scientific researchers, medical and social service professionals, paraprofessionals, and lay persons that FASD is one-hundred percent preventable&quot; (Tait, 2003, p.121). Despite this, the incidence of FASD continues to rise. Experts agree that accurately estimating the prevalence of FASD-affected children is difficult. Factors that may explain this include inadequate diagnostic capacity for FASD, inadequate access to professionals with the required skill sets, studies that are not representative of populations and sub-populations, and a lack of comparability among studies (Chudley, Conry, Loock, &amp; LeBlanc, 2005). In, it is thought that the incidence ranges between 1 and 9 cases in 1,000 live births (Stade, Ungar, Stevens, Beyanne, &amp; Koren, 2006). In some Aboriginal communities in northern, estimated rates of FASD are significantly higher than the national average, ranging between 25 and 200 cases per 1,000 live births (Caley, 2006; Chudley et al., 2005). Notably, research describing incidence rates among Aboriginal people is limited and there are questions about accuracy (Tait, 2003). To date, existing studies on FASD have focused on diagnosis, etiology, and strategies for prevention. Despite the high incidence and the overwhelming impact of FASD, research has not focused on the subjective experiences of Aboriginal women mothering children with FASD. Conceptual Basis: The concepts of vulnerability, marginalization, and mothering, conceptualized within the theoretical perspectives of post colonialism, provided the framework for this study. Postcolonial perspectives were particularly relevant to this research: the explicit aftereffects of colonialism on the well-being of Aboriginal women have shaped the worldview of mainstream society resulting in marginalization and stigmatization. A postcolonial perspective suggests that FASD is a problem compounded by colonization; until the underlying compounding issues are addressed, the incidence of FASD among Aboriginal people will continue to increase. Methods: An interpretive ethnography was conducted with English-speaking Aboriginal women with one or more children between the ages of 14 and 18 years affected by FASD. Data collection included three sequential audio-recorded interviews with eight women over a specific time. Interview data were enhanced by document review, intervals of observation participation, and the examination of other historically and culturally relevant data. Results: The interpretive theory derived from the data, Mothering from the Margins, explains how Aboriginal mothers raise their adolescent children who have FASD. The theory provides a perspective that enables nurses to view mothers with adolescents affected by FASD in an all-encompassing manner, and unifies the experiences of participants mothering adolescents with FASD. Aboriginal mothers of adolescents with FASD continue to experience societal blame and marginalization for consuming alcohol during pregnancy. Implications: This study extends the knowledge of how this blaming and marginalization experience plays out in the lives of both mothers and children. The findings debunk the stereotypical myth that Aboriginal mothers are not good mothers. In fact, the findings from this study demonstrate how, despite all the difficulties and challenges faced by study participants, they have demonstrated adaptability, confidence, and care in their mothering roles.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:10:52Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:10:52Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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