2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157766
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Symposium Overview Abstract: Session 1121
Abstract:
Symposium Overview Abstract: Session 1121
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2009
Author:Keller, Colleen, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Arizona State University, Nursing
Title:Professor
Contact Address:500 N. 3rd street, Phoenix, AZ, 85004, USA
Contact Telephone:602 496 0782
Health disparities continue to exist among vulnerable populations and are apparent in increasing levels of overweight and obesity and in sedentary behaviors. Such disparities are particularly evident among Hispanic women, and may reflect critical gaps in understanding culturally-relevant concepts and approaches to health promotion. This symposium presents the results of programmatic efforts toward specifying the design of culturally-embedded health promotion interventions among Hispanic women. The presentations are designed to address knowledge development through their focus on programmatic research, systematic review, and synthesis of empirical literature, to explicate: (1) unique strengths and resources for health promotion, reflecting culture, and context; (2) the role and relevance of Promotoras in culturally-embedded interventions; (3) innovative methods for formative research in designing culturally-embedded interventions; and (4) the use of treatment/evaluation theory in the design of culturally-embedded interventions. As a whole, the symposium is intended to foster dialog specific to the design of culturally-relevant interventions and to outline innovative approaches for knowledge development specific to health promotion among Hispanic women. Over the last decade there has been marked progress in research identifying relevant correlates of health promoting behavior. Specific to Hispanic women, the challenge remains to synthesize these findings as a foundation for translation to practice. Dr. Fleury presents a multi-level synthesis of determinates of physical activity in Hispanic women, explores the extent to which knowledge exists to inform culturally embedded interventions for health promotion, and outlines the types of evidence needed to further advance the science. The involvement of Promotoras in the design, implementation, and evaluation of health promoting interventions has been proposed to ensure that programs are culturally-embedded; address issues of importance to the community; and promote sustainable, community-wide change. Dr. Fleury further presents a synthesis of the use of Lay Health Advisors in cardiovascular risk reduction, including a discussion of future directions for research. Such interventions may be key to health promotion in Hispanic women. Divergent theoretical models and approaches have been used to guide intervention design for health promotion. However, few have used innovative formative research in intervention design, to build upon the cultural, social, and contextual resources of Hispanic women. Mrs. Perez describes a multi-method approach to design an intervention promoting moderate intensity physical activity in Hispanic women. Dr. Keller describes the corresponding approach to operationalizing the culturally relevant intervention to promote physical activity among Hispanic women, Mujeres en Accion por Su Salud [Women in Action for Their Health]. These efforts are central to advancing the science of culturally-relevant, acceptable, and effective interventions for health promotion among Hispanic women.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSymposium Overview Abstract: Session 1121en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157766-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Symposium Overview Abstract: Session 1121</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Keller, Colleen, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Arizona State University, Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">500 N. 3rd street, Phoenix, AZ, 85004, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">602 496 0782</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">colleen.keller@asu.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Health disparities continue to exist among vulnerable populations and are apparent in increasing levels of overweight and obesity and in sedentary behaviors. Such disparities are particularly evident among Hispanic women, and may reflect critical gaps in understanding culturally-relevant concepts and approaches to health promotion. This symposium presents the results of programmatic efforts toward specifying the design of culturally-embedded health promotion interventions among Hispanic women. The presentations are designed to address knowledge development through their focus on programmatic research, systematic review, and synthesis of empirical literature, to explicate: (1) unique strengths and resources for health promotion, reflecting culture, and context; (2) the role and relevance of Promotoras in culturally-embedded interventions; (3) innovative methods for formative research in designing culturally-embedded interventions; and (4) the use of treatment/evaluation theory in the design of culturally-embedded interventions. As a whole, the symposium is intended to foster dialog specific to the design of culturally-relevant interventions and to outline innovative approaches for knowledge development specific to health promotion among Hispanic women. Over the last decade there has been marked progress in research identifying relevant correlates of health promoting behavior. Specific to Hispanic women, the challenge remains to synthesize these findings as a foundation for translation to practice. Dr. Fleury presents a multi-level synthesis of determinates of physical activity in Hispanic women, explores the extent to which knowledge exists to inform culturally embedded interventions for health promotion, and outlines the types of evidence needed to further advance the science. The involvement of Promotoras in the design, implementation, and evaluation of health promoting interventions has been proposed to ensure that programs are culturally-embedded; address issues of importance to the community; and promote sustainable, community-wide change. Dr. Fleury further presents a synthesis of the use of Lay Health Advisors in cardiovascular risk reduction, including a discussion of future directions for research. Such interventions may be key to health promotion in Hispanic women. Divergent theoretical models and approaches have been used to guide intervention design for health promotion. However, few have used innovative formative research in intervention design, to build upon the cultural, social, and contextual resources of Hispanic women. Mrs. Perez describes a multi-method approach to design an intervention promoting moderate intensity physical activity in Hispanic women. Dr. Keller describes the corresponding approach to operationalizing the culturally relevant intervention to promote physical activity among Hispanic women, Mujeres en Accion por Su Salud [Women in Action for Their Health]. These efforts are central to advancing the science of culturally-relevant, acceptable, and effective interventions for health promotion among Hispanic women.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:11:02Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:11:02Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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