2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157767
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Examining Nursing Surveillance in the Acute Care Setting
Abstract:
Examining Nursing Surveillance in the Acute Care Setting
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2009
Author:Kelly, Lesly, RN, BSN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Arizona
Title:Doctoral Candidate
Contact Address:1344 E Chilton Dr, Tempe, AZ, 85283, USA
Contact Telephone:480-656-4831
Purpose/Aim: The purpose of this study is to identify and describe concepts of nursing surveillance by describing a surveillance event in the acute care setting. Rationale/Background: Surveillance has been described as an important antecedent of the outcome failure-to-rescue (FTR), defined as the inability to prevent a hospitalized patient from deteriorating after an adverse occurrence or complication has occurred (Aiken, 2003). Nurses conduct surveillance to recognize complications early and initiate action to prevent mortality. While more literature is emerging on FTR, the role of surveillance still remains elusive. In order to prevent FTR events, it is important to understand the antecedent of surveillance and its role in decreasing the FTR rate. Methods: A systematic review of the literature identified definitions of surveillance across disciplines and identified attributes of nursing surveillance. Semi-structured interview questions developed from the literature and were used to elicit concepts associated with surveillance in the clinical setting from 10 acute care nurses. Calling the rapid response team (RRT) was used as a proxy for nursing surveillance and each nurse interviewed has called the team at least once. Registered nurses were asked questions about the monitoring, assessing, critical thinking, and evaluation in the events leading up to the initiation of the RRT.  Interviews were recorded and transcribed and detailed coding of the recorded transcripts identified themes associated with nursing surveillance. Outcomes achieved/documented: Three relevant categories of themes were identified from the interviews: intuitive thinking, patient safety, and team support.  Intuitive thinking was supported by evidence in the literature, aligning with concepts of expertise and decision-making to keep patients safe. Nurses identified teamwork concepts of "all hands on deck" to pool knowledge and experience when patients were deteriorating. While thoughts of anxiety and apprehension were associated with the event, nurse's confidence was increased with teamwork and decision-making to initiate the RRT. Conclusions: This study identified and described concepts associated with nursing surveillance. Future research is needed to evaluate nursing surveillance in other situations and settings. This work will help develop items for an instrument to measure nursing surveillance and examine the system characteristics that influence it. Examining surveillance can contribute to the understanding and prevention of FTR events.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleExamining Nursing Surveillance in the Acute Care Settingen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157767-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Examining Nursing Surveillance in the Acute Care Setting</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Kelly, Lesly, RN, BSN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Arizona</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Doctoral Candidate</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">1344 E Chilton Dr, Tempe, AZ, 85283, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">480-656-4831</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">lkelly@nursing.arizona.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose/Aim: The purpose of this study is to identify and describe concepts of nursing surveillance by describing a surveillance event in the acute care setting. Rationale/Background: Surveillance has been described as an important antecedent of the outcome failure-to-rescue (FTR), defined as the inability to prevent a hospitalized patient from deteriorating after an adverse occurrence or complication has occurred (Aiken, 2003). Nurses conduct surveillance to recognize complications early and initiate action to prevent mortality. While more literature is emerging on FTR, the role of surveillance still remains elusive. In order to prevent FTR events, it is important to understand the antecedent of surveillance and its role in decreasing the FTR rate. Methods: A systematic review of the literature identified definitions of surveillance across disciplines and identified attributes of nursing surveillance. Semi-structured interview questions developed from the literature and were used to elicit concepts associated with surveillance in the clinical setting from 10 acute care nurses. Calling the rapid response team (RRT) was used as a proxy for nursing surveillance and each nurse interviewed has called the team at least once. Registered nurses were asked questions about the monitoring, assessing, critical thinking, and evaluation in the events leading up to the initiation of the RRT.&nbsp; Interviews were recorded and transcribed and detailed coding of the recorded transcripts identified themes associated with nursing surveillance. Outcomes achieved/documented: Three relevant categories of themes were identified from the interviews: intuitive thinking, patient safety, and team support.&nbsp; Intuitive thinking was supported by evidence in the literature, aligning with concepts of expertise and decision-making to keep patients safe. Nurses identified teamwork concepts of &quot;all hands on deck&quot; to pool knowledge and experience when patients were deteriorating. While thoughts of anxiety and apprehension were associated with the event, nurse's confidence was increased with teamwork and decision-making to initiate the RRT. Conclusions: This study identified and described concepts associated with nursing surveillance. Future research is needed to evaluate nursing surveillance in other situations and settings. This work will help develop items for an instrument to measure nursing surveillance and examine the system characteristics that influence it. Examining surveillance can contribute to the understanding and prevention of FTR events.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:11:06Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:11:06Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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