2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157769
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Conceptualizing Adolescent Resilience from the Perspective of Parenting
Abstract:
Conceptualizing Adolescent Resilience from the Perspective of Parenting
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2009
Author:Kim, JaHun, RN, MSN, Ph, C
P.I. Institution Name:University of Washington, Psychosocial and Community Health Nursing
Title:Ph D student
Contact Address:1959 NE Pacific Street, BOX 357260, Seattle, WA, 98195, USA
Contact Telephone:206-795-2079
Purpose and Conceptual Basis: Resilience is defined as a positive developmental outcome in the context of various risks and protective factors. In earlier research, investigators focused on personal characteristics as precursors of resilience. This means that they assumed such personal characteristics would lead to positive outcomes under significant risks (risk factors). However, after 30 years of studying resilience, investigators drew a consensus conclusion that resilience is a process of overcoming circumstantial risks through the use of resources (protective factors) given to the adolescent. This presentation will describe potential theoretical underpinnings of parenting as they relate to adolescent resilience. Literature review was done to explore what kinds of parenting variables were real protectors from negative developmental outcomes, to examine whether the parenting variables would relate to specific positive developmental outcomes, and to understand mediating and moderating effects of parenting variables on risk, protective factors and positive developmental outcomes. Methods: In order to investigate how parenting influences resilience and promotes positive developmental outcomes, a literature review was conducted. PubMed and PsychINFO were searched using key words, "adolescent resilient," "adolescent development," "parenting," "parent-child relationship," and "protective factor." Inclusion criteria were: 1) theoretical review about parenting and its influence on adolescent development; 2) empirical and interpretive studies showing a broad spectrum of parenting; and 3) studies that measured a range of adolescent positive outcomes. Included for review were eight empirical studies, four theoretical articles, and one qualitative study. Results: The most challenging aspect of this review was to meaningfully group parenting practices and conceptualize parenting phenomena with relation to adolescent positive outcomes under significant risks. The review included late childhood (8 years old) to late adolescence (19 years old) and one longitudinal study examined parenting in early childhood (2-5 years old) and its effect on adolescence. There is consistent agreement among studies about what constitute of positive and negative parenting. Positive parenting included parental monitoring, behavior control, limit setting, parental warmth, and acceptance. Parental monitoring was found to be a strong and significant protective factor against externalizing behavior (such as aggression), age of substance use initiation, continuing substance use, and delinquency. Behavior control and limit setting were important protective factors against delinquency. Lastly, parental warmth and acceptance played protective roles for promoting positive outcomes in various risks, such as low and high socioeconomic status, maternal depression, and multiple stress events. This review reveals that the study of resilience and parenting should consider adolescent population characteristics, number and severity of risks, and types of outcomes. Implication: Resilience as a process focuses on the interrelationship between risks and protective factors and positive outcomes. Understanding resilience as a process is an attempt to avoid the equation, resilience = personal ability = positive outcome under risks. With the concept of resilience as a process, the following questions might be raised; what kinds of resources children have; whether or not the resources are enough to overcome their risk; and who can provide the resources.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleConceptualizing Adolescent Resilience from the Perspective of Parentingen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157769-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Conceptualizing Adolescent Resilience from the Perspective of Parenting</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Kim, JaHun, RN, MSN, Ph, C</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Washington, Psychosocial and Community Health Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Ph D student</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">1959 NE Pacific Street, BOX 357260, Seattle, WA, 98195, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">206-795-2079</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">jaya609@u.washington.edu, jaya609@gmail.com</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose and Conceptual Basis: Resilience is defined as a positive developmental outcome in the context of various risks and protective factors. In earlier research, investigators focused on personal characteristics as precursors of resilience. This means that they assumed such personal characteristics would lead to positive outcomes under significant risks (risk factors). However, after 30 years of studying resilience, investigators drew a consensus conclusion that resilience is a process of overcoming circumstantial risks through the use of resources (protective factors) given to the adolescent. This presentation will describe potential theoretical underpinnings of parenting as they relate to adolescent resilience. Literature review was done to explore what kinds of parenting variables were real protectors from negative developmental outcomes, to examine whether the parenting variables would relate to specific positive developmental outcomes, and to understand mediating and moderating effects of parenting variables on risk, protective factors and positive developmental outcomes. Methods: In order to investigate how parenting influences resilience and promotes positive developmental outcomes, a literature review was conducted. PubMed and PsychINFO were searched using key words, &quot;adolescent resilient,&quot; &quot;adolescent development,&quot; &quot;parenting,&quot; &quot;parent-child relationship,&quot; and &quot;protective factor.&quot; Inclusion criteria were: 1) theoretical review about parenting and its influence on adolescent development; 2) empirical and interpretive studies showing a broad spectrum of parenting; and 3) studies that measured a range of adolescent positive outcomes. Included for review were eight empirical studies, four theoretical articles, and one qualitative study. Results: The most challenging aspect of this review was to meaningfully group parenting practices and conceptualize parenting phenomena with relation to adolescent positive outcomes under significant risks. The review included late childhood (8 years old) to late adolescence (19 years old) and one longitudinal study examined parenting in early childhood (2-5 years old) and its effect on adolescence. There is consistent agreement among studies about what constitute of positive and negative parenting. Positive parenting included parental monitoring, behavior control, limit setting, parental warmth, and acceptance. Parental monitoring was found to be a strong and significant protective factor against externalizing behavior (such as aggression), age of substance use initiation, continuing substance use, and delinquency. Behavior control and limit setting were important protective factors against delinquency. Lastly, parental warmth and acceptance played protective roles for promoting positive outcomes in various risks, such as low and high socioeconomic status, maternal depression, and multiple stress events. This review reveals that the study of resilience and parenting should consider adolescent population characteristics, number and severity of risks, and types of outcomes. Implication: Resilience as a process focuses on the interrelationship between risks and protective factors and positive outcomes. Understanding resilience as a process is an attempt to avoid the equation, resilience = personal ability = positive outcome under risks. With the concept of resilience as a process, the following questions might be raised; what kinds of resources children have; whether or not the resources are enough to overcome their risk; and who can provide the resources.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:11:12Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:11:12Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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