2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157770
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Using Electronic Medical Records for Research: Possibilities and Pitfalls
Abstract:
Using Electronic Medical Records for Research: Possibilities and Pitfalls
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2009
Author:Kindler, Lindsay Lancaster, MS, RN, CNS
P.I. Institution Name:Oregon Health & Sciences University, School of Nursing
Title:PhD Candidate
Contact Address:3455 SW US Veterans Hospital Rd., Portland, OR, 97239, USA
Contact Telephone:503-680-7484
As the use of electronic medical records in patient care continually expands, one cannot ignore the benefit this technology brings to patient care and provider access to patient information. Less clear are the opportunities this growing trend presents for research. This presentation discusses the advantages and limitations encountered when using a health system's electronic medical record for a moderately-sized research study. One obvious boon to using an electronic medical record is the opportunity to identify patients with specific conditions. The author's research study investigated patients with chronic back and neck pain. The searchable database allowed the investigator to identify 25 diagnoses that constitute chronic back or neck pain. The capabilities of the database allowed the search to include only patients who had been seen in a certain specialty clinic within a specified time period. These features helped identify 2,000 potential research participants within a matter of minutes. While identifying patients by diagnosis presents great opportunities for inviting patients to participate in research studies or for disease prevalence studies, this seemingly straightforward approach carries its own risks. Even within a single health system, providers often do not have standardized criteria used to diagnose specific health conditions. The diagnostic code used typically relates more to the practitioner?s preference for labeling a particular set of symptoms. Furthermore, a provider may not necessarily apply a diagnosis at the time a patient first presents with an illness, further influencing epidemiologic studies of disease prevalence and incidence. Documentation of symptoms and treatment can also vary by a practitioner's level of detail in charting. To create increased consistency in charting, many systems have electronic questionnaires that the patient or provider complete. This automated data capture creates readily retrievable data that can be tracked over time, although exclusively charting in this manner could exclude more descriptive, clinically relevant details. While the researcher must rely on busy staff for most clinical documentation, automated medication dispensing systems offer a slightly higher level of reliability. These systems help the researcher to approximate medication use according to dispense history, although a true reflection of what the patient consumed cannot be guaranteed. The abundance of data available in electronic medical records presents great opportunities for research. Limitations related to scope of data, specificity of information, and consistency in reporting must be considered when using such data for research. However, development of thoughtful, retrievable approaches for additional clinical and research purposes represents an exciting extension of the data's potential.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleUsing Electronic Medical Records for Research: Possibilities and Pitfallsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157770-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Using Electronic Medical Records for Research: Possibilities and Pitfalls</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Kindler, Lindsay Lancaster, MS, RN, CNS</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Oregon Health &amp; Sciences University, School of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">PhD Candidate</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">3455 SW US Veterans Hospital Rd., Portland, OR, 97239, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">503-680-7484</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">kindlerl@ohsu.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">As the use of electronic medical records in patient care continually expands, one cannot ignore the benefit this technology brings to patient care and provider access to patient information. Less clear are the opportunities this growing trend presents for research. This presentation discusses the advantages and limitations encountered when using a health system's electronic medical record for a moderately-sized research study. One obvious boon to using an electronic medical record is the opportunity to identify patients with specific conditions. The author's research study investigated patients with chronic back and neck pain. The searchable database allowed the investigator to identify 25 diagnoses that constitute chronic back or neck pain. The capabilities of the database allowed the search to include only patients who had been seen in a certain specialty clinic within a specified time period. These features helped identify 2,000 potential research participants within a matter of minutes. While identifying patients by diagnosis presents great opportunities for inviting patients to participate in research studies or for disease prevalence studies, this seemingly straightforward approach carries its own risks. Even within a single health system, providers often do not have standardized criteria used to diagnose specific health conditions. The diagnostic code used typically relates more to the practitioner?s preference for labeling a particular set of symptoms. Furthermore, a provider may not necessarily apply a diagnosis at the time a patient first presents with an illness, further influencing epidemiologic studies of disease prevalence and incidence. Documentation of symptoms and treatment can also vary by a practitioner's level of detail in charting. To create increased consistency in charting, many systems have electronic questionnaires that the patient or provider complete. This automated data capture creates readily retrievable data that can be tracked over time, although exclusively charting in this manner could exclude more descriptive, clinically relevant details. While the researcher must rely on busy staff for most clinical documentation, automated medication dispensing systems offer a slightly higher level of reliability. These systems help the researcher to approximate medication use according to dispense history, although a true reflection of what the patient consumed cannot be guaranteed. The abundance of data available in electronic medical records presents great opportunities for research. Limitations related to scope of data, specificity of information, and consistency in reporting must be considered when using such data for research. However, development of thoughtful, retrievable approaches for additional clinical and research purposes represents an exciting extension of the data's potential.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:11:16Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:11:16Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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