The Libby Asbestos Health Status Study: Economic Outcomes and Policy Implications

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157772
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Libby Asbestos Health Status Study: Economic Outcomes and Policy Implications
Abstract:
The Libby Asbestos Health Status Study: Economic Outcomes and Policy Implications
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2009
Author:Kuntz, Sandra W., PhD, PHCNS-BC
P.I. Institution Name:Montana State University, College of Nursing
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:32 Campus Drive #7416, Missoula, MT, 59812-7416, USA
Contact Telephone:406-243-2551
Purpose/Aims: The purpose of this presentation is to (a) report the economic aspects of care (perception of access and finances based on the PSQ II results), (b) discuss the significance of integrating the physiological and psychosocial findings, and (c) identify a rural health policy model for addressing the long-term ebb and flow of asbestos-related disease (ARD). Background: The interaction of physiological, psychosocial, and economic (perception of access and ability to finance long-term chronic illness) factors "can account for ebb and flow of diseases over time" (IOM, 2003, p. 34). Application of an ecological model is necessary in order to address the long-term health needs of a population impacted by a disease with a long latency period and, to date, no cure. Methods: Local and distance CARD clinic Libby Health Status Study participants completed two sub-scales (financial aspects and access/availability/convenience) of the Patient Satisfaction Questionnaire (PSQ-II). In addition to the economic indicators of health, participants also completed three psychosocial surveys (depression [CES-D], acceptance of illness [AOIS], and perceived stress [PSS]) and one biological survey (the severity of respiratory illness [SGRQ]). The lens of an ecological framework is used to examine the interacting and multi-determinant components of ARD that could lead to interventions to improve quality of life. Results: The PSQ II, used as a proxy for the perception of economic health in the Libby cohort of patients with ARD, indicated a significantly lower score on both the access and financial aspects subscales when compared with a sample of adult patients with one or more of four chronic conditions. An ecological model is proposed to balance the multi-determinants of health discovered in the larger Libby Health Status Study that has examined the physiological and psychosocial condition of the impacted population. Implications: Victims of the worst environmental disaster in US history who live without a promised public health emergency declaration that would have assured health care may be challenged to realize the recommendations of the Institute of Medicine's Committee on Quality of Health Care in America (2001) suggesting health care should be comprehensive, coordinated, continuous, and accessible to rural residents. People living with the uncertainties associated with latency and the complexities of physiological, psychological, social, and economic factors once diagnosed with ARD require health care policy that is predictable, dependable, and ecologically responsive to their fluctuating health needs.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Libby Asbestos Health Status Study: Economic Outcomes and Policy Implicationsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157772-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Libby Asbestos Health Status Study: Economic Outcomes and Policy Implications</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Kuntz, Sandra W., PhD, PHCNS-BC</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Montana State University, College of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">32 Campus Drive #7416, Missoula, MT, 59812-7416, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">406-243-2551</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">skuntz@montana.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose/Aims: The purpose of this presentation is to (a) report the economic aspects of care (perception of access and finances based on the PSQ II results), (b) discuss the significance of integrating the physiological and psychosocial findings, and (c) identify a rural health policy model for addressing the long-term ebb and flow of asbestos-related disease (ARD). Background: The interaction of physiological, psychosocial, and economic (perception of access and ability to finance long-term chronic illness) factors &quot;can account for ebb and flow of diseases over time&quot; (IOM, 2003, p. 34). Application of an ecological model is necessary in order to address the long-term health needs of a population impacted by a disease with a long latency period and, to date, no cure. Methods: Local and distance CARD clinic Libby Health Status Study participants completed two sub-scales (financial aspects and access/availability/convenience) of the Patient Satisfaction Questionnaire (PSQ-II). In addition to the economic indicators of health, participants also completed three psychosocial surveys (depression [CES-D], acceptance of illness [AOIS], and perceived stress [PSS]) and one biological survey (the severity of respiratory illness [SGRQ]). The lens of an ecological framework is used to examine the interacting and multi-determinant components of ARD that could lead to interventions to improve quality of life. Results: The PSQ II, used as a proxy for the perception of economic health in the Libby cohort of patients with ARD, indicated a significantly lower score on both the access and financial aspects subscales when compared with a sample of adult patients with one or more of four chronic conditions. An ecological model is proposed to balance the multi-determinants of health discovered in the larger Libby Health Status Study that has examined the physiological and psychosocial condition of the impacted population. Implications: Victims of the worst environmental disaster in US history who live without a promised public health emergency declaration that would have assured health care may be challenged to realize the recommendations of the Institute of Medicine's Committee on Quality of Health Care in America (2001) suggesting health care should be comprehensive, coordinated, continuous, and accessible to rural residents. People living with the uncertainties associated with latency and the complexities of physiological, psychological, social, and economic factors once diagnosed with ARD require health care policy that is predictable, dependable, and ecologically responsive to their fluctuating health needs.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:11:22Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:11:22Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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