2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157774
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Comparison of the PSQI and Sleep Diary Measures of Sleep in Adolescents
Abstract:
Comparison of the PSQI and Sleep Diary Measures of Sleep in Adolescents
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2009
Author:Landis, Andrea M., RN, FNP
P.I. Institution Name:University of Washington, Biobehavioral Nursing and Health Systems
Title:Post Doctoral Fellow
Contact Address:7218 Fremont Ave North, Seattle, WA, 98103, USA
Contact Telephone:206-499-5390
Purpose: The purpose of this study was to explore associations among reported sleep diary and the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) measures of sleep in a sample of healthy adolescents. Background: Adolescents are prone to various sleep/wake disturbances that can affect their sleep. Impaired sleep in adolescents is linked to increased risk of poor school performance, negative moods, obesity, and unintentional injuries and death.  It is challenging to accurately measure total sleep time (TST) and sleep onset in this population in the clinical setting. Methods: The sample included 87 healthy adolescents (42.5% males; mean +/- SD age = 15.6 +/- 1.4 years; range = 14-18 years) recruited from the community and a local high school. Exclusion criteria included a previous diagnosis of narcolepsy, significant medical or psychological problems, and those taking medications known to affect their sleep. Students completed the PSQI, a self-rated 24-item assessment of last month?s sleep quality, and a 7-day sleep diary was initiated.  The study was conducted from October 2006 to April 2007, excluding school breaks, standardized testing periods, and the week following the transition to daylight savings time. Because some of the data did not meet the appropriate assumptions, parametric and nonparametric procedures were used for analysis (Alpha = .05). Results:  Average PSQI global scores were 4.95 +/- 2.4; 34.5% of the adolescents endorsed poor subjective sleep quality (PSQI global score > 5). The major sleep variables of interest included TST (hours) and sleep onset (minutes). The mean reported TST from PSQI and sleep diary were 7.49 +/- 1.2 and 7.52 +/- .87 (hours), respectively; reflecting a relatively short nocturnal sleep period. The mean reported sleep onset from PSQI and sleep diary were 16.71 +/- 13.6 and 14.97 +/- 14.2 (minutes), respectively.  Paired t-test showed no statistical difference in reported TST between PSQI and sleep diary (t = .247, p = .81). Wilcoxon Rank Sum test revealed no statistical difference in sleep onset between PSQI and sleep diary (z = -1.79, p = .07). Implications: The findings suggest that decreased TST and poor sleep quality are common problems in this age group. The self-reported PSQI and 7-day sleep diary are comparable measures of TST and sleep onset in a group of adolescents. By using such sleep measures, clinicians, especially school nurses, can identify and develop individual and family interventions designed to improve the sleep patterns of adolescents.  Further research comparing the PSQI to more objective measures of sleep, such as wrist actigraphy, in a larger sample is warranted.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleComparison of the PSQI and Sleep Diary Measures of Sleep in Adolescentsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157774-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Comparison of the PSQI and Sleep Diary Measures of Sleep in Adolescents</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Landis, Andrea M., RN, FNP</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Washington, Biobehavioral Nursing and Health Systems</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Post Doctoral Fellow</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">7218 Fremont Ave North, Seattle, WA, 98103, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">206-499-5390</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">amlandis@u.washington.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: The purpose of this study was to explore associations among reported sleep diary and the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) measures of sleep in a sample of healthy adolescents. Background: Adolescents are prone to various sleep/wake disturbances that can affect their sleep. Impaired sleep in adolescents is linked to increased risk of poor school performance, negative moods, obesity, and unintentional injuries and death.&nbsp; It is challenging to accurately measure total sleep time (TST) and sleep onset in this population in the clinical setting. Methods: The sample included 87 healthy adolescents (42.5% males; mean +/- SD age = 15.6 +/- 1.4 years; range = 14-18 years) recruited from the community and a local high school. Exclusion criteria included a previous diagnosis of narcolepsy, significant medical or psychological problems, and those taking medications known to affect their sleep. Students completed the PSQI, a self-rated 24-item assessment of last month?s sleep quality, and a 7-day sleep diary was initiated.&nbsp; The study was conducted from October 2006 to April 2007, excluding school breaks, standardized testing periods, and the week following the transition to daylight savings time. Because some of the data did not meet the appropriate assumptions, parametric and nonparametric procedures were used for analysis (Alpha = .05). Results:&nbsp; Average PSQI global scores were 4.95 +/- 2.4; 34.5% of the adolescents endorsed poor subjective sleep quality (PSQI global score &gt; 5). The major sleep variables of interest included TST (hours) and sleep onset (minutes). The mean reported TST from PSQI and sleep diary were 7.49 +/- 1.2 and 7.52 +/- .87 (hours), respectively; reflecting a relatively short nocturnal sleep period. The mean reported sleep onset from PSQI and sleep diary were 16.71 +/- 13.6 and 14.97 +/- 14.2 (minutes), respectively. &nbsp;Paired t-test showed no statistical difference in reported TST between PSQI and sleep diary (t = .247, p = .81). Wilcoxon Rank Sum test revealed no statistical difference in sleep onset between PSQI and sleep diary (z = -1.79, p = .07). Implications: The findings suggest that decreased TST and poor sleep quality are common problems in this age group. The self-reported PSQI and 7-day sleep diary are comparable measures of TST and sleep onset in a group of adolescents. By using such sleep measures, clinicians, especially school nurses, can identify and develop individual and family interventions designed to improve the sleep patterns of adolescents.&nbsp; Further research comparing the PSQI to more objective measures of sleep, such as wrist actigraphy, in a larger sample is warranted.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:11:29Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:11:29Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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