2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157776
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Native Hawaiian Health & Well-Being in the "9th Hawaiian Island," Las Vegas
Abstract:
Native Hawaiian Health & Well-Being in the "9th Hawaiian Island," Las Vegas
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2009
Author:Lassetter, Jane Hansen, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Brigham Young University, College of Nursing
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:2288 N 1430 E, Provo, UT, 84604, USA
Contact Telephone:801 885-0835
Purpose/Aims: The purpose was to describe how Native Hawaiians perceive their health and well-being and any changes therein since migrating from Hawaii to Las Vegas. Rationale: Migration is often a challenging process. Native Hawaiians are migrating to Las Vegas at an impressive rate, but no research has explored how migration from Hawaii to Las Vegas impacts Native Hawaiian health and well-being. Exploring their perceptions of health and well-being is the first step toward culturally competent nursing care and improving Native Hawaiian migrants' health and well-being. Method: A qualitative descriptive design was used, and 27 participants took part in semi-structured interviews. Data analysis involved: 1) transcribing interviews, 2) reading transcripts, 3) coding related segments, and 4) identifying themes and categories. Results: Most participants perceived no changes in health and minor changes in well-being, but the period shortly after migration was a vulnerable time. Many maintained their well-being by adapting valued activities to their new circumstances. However, a few were deeply burdened by life in Las Vegas or longing for Hawaii, and their well-being suffered. They tended to identify barriers to well-being rather than ways to foster it. Implications: Increased vulnerability shortly after migration suggests a need for early access into the health care system. Nurses can lead efforts to inform new migrants about where and how to access health care. Additionally, nurses can assist with anticipatory preparation prior to migration and with exploration of helpful, adaptive behaviors after migration.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleNative Hawaiian Health & Well-Being in the "9th Hawaiian Island," Las Vegasen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157776-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Native Hawaiian Health &amp; Well-Being in the &quot;9th Hawaiian Island,&quot; Las Vegas</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Lassetter, Jane Hansen, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Brigham Young University, College of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">2288 N 1430 E, Provo, UT, 84604, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">801 885-0835</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">jane_lassetter@byu.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose/Aims: The purpose was to describe how Native Hawaiians perceive their health and well-being and any changes therein since migrating from Hawaii to Las Vegas. Rationale: Migration is often a challenging process. Native Hawaiians are migrating to Las Vegas at an impressive rate, but no research has explored how migration from Hawaii to Las Vegas impacts Native Hawaiian health and well-being. Exploring their perceptions of health and well-being is the first step toward culturally competent nursing care and improving Native Hawaiian migrants' health and well-being. Method: A qualitative descriptive design was used, and 27 participants took part in semi-structured interviews. Data analysis involved: 1) transcribing interviews, 2) reading transcripts, 3) coding related segments, and 4) identifying themes and categories. Results: Most participants perceived no changes in health and minor changes in well-being, but the period shortly after migration was a vulnerable time. Many maintained their well-being by adapting valued activities to their new circumstances. However, a few were deeply burdened by life in Las Vegas or longing for Hawaii, and their well-being suffered. They tended to identify barriers to well-being rather than ways to foster it. Implications: Increased vulnerability shortly after migration suggests a need for early access into the health care system. Nurses can lead efforts to inform new migrants about where and how to access health care. Additionally, nurses can assist with anticipatory preparation prior to migration and with exploration of helpful, adaptive behaviors after migration.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:11:36Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:11:36Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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