Maternal Use of Mood Disorder Medication Predicts the Occurrence of Preterm Birth

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157777
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Maternal Use of Mood Disorder Medication Predicts the Occurrence of Preterm Birth
Abstract:
Maternal Use of Mood Disorder Medication Predicts the Occurrence of Preterm Birth
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2009
Author:Latendresse, Gwen A., CNM, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Utah, College of Nursing
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:10 S. 2000 E., Salt Lake City, UT, 84112, USA
Contact Telephone:801-793-5720
Purposes/Aims: The primary aim of this study of 100 pregnant women was to identify which measures of maternal chronic stress have the strongest and most predictive relationships with preterm birth. Stress was operationalized by using one biological marker (corticotrophin-releasing hormone - CRH), as well as psychometric, demographic, and behavioral measures. Background/Rationale: Despite four decades of intense research to decrease the rate of preterm birth, preterm birthrates have increased 31% since1980. There is compelling evidence that chronic maternal stress contributes to the risk of preterm birth by instigating adverse pathophysiologic cascades during pregnancy. Capturing a comprehensive picture of chronic stress may be accomplished using a biobehavioral research approach that uses multiple measures, including biomarkers (corticotrophin-releasing hormone), psychometrics, and identification of medication use for mood disorders (i.e. depression and anxiety). While stress, depression, and anxiety are highly correlated, and 10-12% of women may be using medications to treat mood disorders during pregnancy, it is not clear how these medications impact mood during pregnancy, nor the risk of PTB. Methods: Maternal blood samples were collected from one hundred women who were between 14 and 20 weeks of gestation. Eighty five of these women also completed self-administered surveys. Samples were assayed by radioimmunoassay for CRH levels. Surveys assessed measures of stress, optimism, depression, coping style, anxiety, and social support, in addition to demographics and behavioral patterns (i.e. nutrition, physical activity, medication use), and domestic violence. Outcome data were obtained from labor and delivery hospital records. Results: Associations were found between the occurrence of preterm birth and use of medications for mood disorders early in pregnancy (X squared = 13.485; p = .00), and at any time during pregnancy (Chi squared = 4.968; p = .08). Associations were also found between the occurrence of preterm birth and higher levels of pregnancy-related anxiety (Chi squared = 2.663; p = .10), as well as higher levels of CRH (Chi squared = 13.154; p = .00). Logistic regression identified one predictor (use of medications for mood disorders early in pregnancy) for preterm birth, indicating that these women are 10.5 times more likely (p = .002) to deliver a preterm infant than women who did not use such medications. Implications: These results suggest that women with mood disorders (i.e. depression and anxiety) requiring medication, have a higher risk of preterm birth. While other studies have found associations between stress, anxiety, depression, and preterm birth, it is unclear whether medications for mood disorders alter the risk for preterm birth. Additional research on this issue could be illuminating.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMaternal Use of Mood Disorder Medication Predicts the Occurrence of Preterm Birthen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157777-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Maternal Use of Mood Disorder Medication Predicts the Occurrence of Preterm Birth</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Latendresse, Gwen A., CNM, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Utah, College of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">10 S. 2000 E., Salt Lake City, UT, 84112, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">801-793-5720</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">gwen.latendresse@nurs.utah.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purposes/Aims: The primary aim of this study of 100 pregnant women was to identify which measures of maternal chronic stress have the strongest and most predictive relationships with preterm birth. Stress was operationalized by using one biological marker (corticotrophin-releasing hormone - CRH), as well as psychometric, demographic, and behavioral measures. Background/Rationale: Despite four decades of intense research to decrease the rate of preterm birth, preterm birthrates have increased 31% since1980. There is compelling evidence that chronic maternal stress contributes to the risk of preterm birth by instigating adverse pathophysiologic cascades during pregnancy. Capturing a comprehensive picture of chronic stress may be accomplished using a biobehavioral research approach that uses multiple measures, including biomarkers (corticotrophin-releasing hormone), psychometrics, and identification of medication use for mood disorders (i.e. depression and anxiety). While stress, depression, and anxiety are highly correlated, and 10-12% of women may be using medications to treat mood disorders during pregnancy, it is not clear how these medications impact mood during pregnancy, nor the risk of PTB. Methods: Maternal blood samples were collected from one hundred women who were between 14 and 20 weeks of gestation. Eighty five of these women also completed self-administered surveys. Samples were assayed by radioimmunoassay for CRH levels. Surveys assessed measures of stress, optimism, depression, coping style, anxiety, and social support, in addition to demographics and behavioral patterns (i.e. nutrition, physical activity, medication use), and domestic violence. Outcome data were obtained from labor and delivery hospital records. Results: Associations were found between the occurrence of preterm birth and use of medications for mood disorders early in pregnancy (X squared = 13.485; p = .00), and at any time during pregnancy (Chi squared = 4.968; p = .08). Associations were also found between the occurrence of preterm birth and higher levels of pregnancy-related anxiety (Chi squared = 2.663; p = .10), as well as higher levels of CRH (Chi squared = 13.154; p = .00). Logistic regression identified one predictor (use of medications for mood disorders early in pregnancy) for preterm birth, indicating that these women are 10.5 times more likely (p = .002) to deliver a preterm infant than women who did not use such medications. Implications: These results suggest that women with mood disorders (i.e. depression and anxiety) requiring medication, have a higher risk of preterm birth. While other studies have found associations between stress, anxiety, depression, and preterm birth, it is unclear whether medications for mood disorders alter the risk for preterm birth. Additional research on this issue could be illuminating.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:11:40Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:11:40Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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