2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157780
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Can a Gerontology Course Change Student Attitudes Toward Aging?
Abstract:
Can a Gerontology Course Change Student Attitudes Toward Aging?
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2009
Author:Lee, Young-Shin, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:San Diego State University, Nursing
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:5500 Campanile Dr., San Diego, CA, 92182, USA
Contact Telephone:619-594-5385
Background: Widespread negative attitudes in society toward aging are obstacles to the recruitment and training of high-quality care providers for the elderly. Few studies, however, have addressed the problems posed by those debilitating attitudes. Purposes: To determine student attitudes toward older people and investigate the changes in those attitudes through a semester. Methods: A total of 137 students taking a gerontology course in a nursing program completed three measures twice at the beginning and the end of semesters: (1) Kogan's scale of attitudes toward older people, (2) facts-on-aging quizzes (FAQ), and (3) journal entries expressing the respondents' beliefs, affects, and experience regarding older people. Data from all three measures were quantified and analyzed for positive, negative, physical, and social views. Results: In the subjective measures (Kogan's attitude scale and journal writing), the respondents reported more positive attitudes than negative attitudes, while the objective measure (facts-on-aging quizzes) indicated a more anti-aged bias than a pro-aged bias. In journal entries, respondents expressed more toward the social and physical functions toward aging than emotional views. A paired t-test indicated that the respondents showed significant improvements in positive attitudes in all three types of measures and a significant reduction in negative attitudes in Kogan's attitude scale and journal entries. In addition, the journal entries revealed the respondents significantly less expressed in social aspects in journal entries over time. However, the anti-aged bias score in FAQ and physical expressions in journal entries did not reveal a significant difference over time. Conclusions: The gerontological course education was effective to change student views toward aging. Students significantly improved their positive views and eliminated their negative views toward aging through learning process.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCan a Gerontology Course Change Student Attitudes Toward Aging?en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157780-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Can a Gerontology Course Change Student Attitudes Toward Aging?</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Lee, Young-Shin, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">San Diego State University, Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">5500 Campanile Dr., San Diego, CA, 92182, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">619-594-5385</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">ylee@mail.sdsu.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Background: Widespread negative attitudes in society toward aging are obstacles to the recruitment and training of high-quality care providers for the elderly. Few studies, however, have addressed the problems posed by those debilitating attitudes. Purposes: To determine student attitudes toward older people and investigate the changes in those attitudes through a semester. Methods: A total of 137 students taking a gerontology course in a nursing program completed three measures twice at the beginning and the end of semesters: (1) Kogan's scale of attitudes toward older people, (2) facts-on-aging quizzes (FAQ), and (3) journal entries expressing the respondents' beliefs, affects, and experience regarding older people. Data from all three measures were quantified and analyzed for positive, negative, physical, and social views. Results: In the subjective measures (Kogan's attitude scale and journal writing), the respondents reported more positive attitudes than negative attitudes, while the objective measure (facts-on-aging quizzes) indicated a more anti-aged bias than a pro-aged bias. In journal entries, respondents expressed more toward the social and physical functions toward aging than emotional views.&nbsp;A paired t-test indicated that the respondents showed significant improvements in positive attitudes in all three types of measures and a significant reduction in negative attitudes in Kogan's attitude scale and journal entries. In addition, the journal entries revealed the respondents significantly less expressed in social aspects in journal entries over time. However, the anti-aged bias score in FAQ and physical expressions in journal entries did not reveal a significant difference over time. Conclusions: The gerontological course education was effective to change student views toward aging. Students significantly improved their positive views and eliminated their negative views toward aging through learning process.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:11:50Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:11:50Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.