2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157786
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Impact of Caregiving on Family Caregivers of Elders With Dementia in China
Abstract:
Impact of Caregiving on Family Caregivers of Elders With Dementia in China
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2009
Author:Liu, Yu, PhDstudent
P.I. Institution Name:The University of Arizona College of Nursing
Title:Msn RN
Contact Address:2537 E. Lester, Tucson, AZ, 85716, USA
Contact Telephone:520-971-7210
Co-Authors:Kathleen Insel, PhD, RN, Associate Professor
Background: The number of elderly is increasing as our population grows and lifespan expectancy increases. However, there is a co-occurring increased risk of dementia with increasing age. In China, the prevalence of dementia varies among different cities, and generally affects 8.59% to 9.0% of people aged 60 and over (Sheng, 2000; Tian, 2003). Because dementia results in progressive deterioration leading to disability and dependence, more care is required. In China, care of those with dementia typically occurs within the context of the family. This phenomenon is a reflection of familism and filial piety in the Chinese culture. Caring for a family member with dementia poses significant challenges. Unfortunately, studies related to family caregiving are not extensive in China, even though this research area has grown dramatically in Western countries over the past 2 decades. Most investigations that focus on the caregiver document the deleterious effects of caring for a person with dementia at home, including increased risk of depression, lower immune function, general health deterioration, role overload, family financial strain, and family conflict. In addition, more negative impacts of caring on caregivers can result in institutionalization of the individual with dementia with consequent rapid deterioration. Recently, there is greater focus on the positive aspects of providing care to those with dementia in the caregiving literature. These positive qualities are termed uplifts, gains, or satisfaction. Some research reveals the important mediating role of these variables in the association between caregiving stressors and adaptation. Therefore, it is important to explore the impact of caregiving by examining not only these negative consequences of caregiving, but also those seen as positive by the caregivers themselves. However, literature on the investigation of both positive and negative effects of family caregiving is underdeveloped not only in western countries but also in Asia. A literature review verifies that a shortage of systematic studies related to family caregiving in China exists, and studies on the positive impact of caregiving are especially limited. Chinese culture emphasizes the key role family plays in coping when a member becomes sick, and it also highly values the efforts that each family member contributes in order to achieve family harmony again. Therefore, how caring of elders with dementia at home affects family caregivers and whether Chinese culture significantly influences the positive and negative impact of caring are questions that need to be answered.  Research Purposes: a) To describe the positive and negative impact of caregiving upon family caregivers of elders with dementia in China; b) To explore the influences that Chinese culture has on the impact of caregiving upon family caregivers of elders with dementia in China. Conceptual Framework: Pearlin's Stress Process Model (1990) will be utilized as the conceptual framework in this study. It was developed specifically for caregivers of patients with Alzheimer's disease in Western countries. The model describes not only the negative impact of caregiving (e.g., role overload, family conflict, and work conflict) but also the positive impact of caring (uplifting). It also highlights the effects of contextual factors which have a potential impact on the caregiving process. Culture is one of important variables under the contextual factors in Pearlin's model. Research Methods: A cross-sectional correlational design will be utilized in this study. A convenience sample of subjects (a cubed 65 years) diagnosed with dementia by psychiatrists and their family caregivers will be recruited from the Outpatient Clinic of Psychiatric Hospital in Beijing, China. Their family caregivers will also be (a) caring for the individual at least 4 hours per day; (b) functioning as a caregiver for at least 6 months prior to participating in the study. Caregivers will be excluded if they are currently providing care to another family member with a chronic physical or mental illness. Significance: This study will provide information that extends nurses knowledge of the positive and negative impact of caregiving upon family caregivers in the context of Chinese culture, and help nurses provide nursing interventions, which are target the positive aspect of caregiving and decrease negative impact on family caregivers.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleImpact of Caregiving on Family Caregivers of Elders With Dementia in Chinaen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157786-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Impact of Caregiving on Family Caregivers of Elders With Dementia in China</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Liu, Yu, PhDstudent</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">The University of Arizona College of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Msn RN</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">2537 E. Lester, Tucson, AZ, 85716, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">520-971-7210</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">yliu@nursing.arizona.edu, liuyubmu@163.com</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Kathleen Insel, PhD, RN, Associate Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Background: The number of elderly is increasing as our population grows and lifespan expectancy increases. However, there is a co-occurring increased risk of dementia with increasing age. In China, the prevalence of dementia varies among different cities, and generally affects 8.59% to 9.0% of people aged 60 and over (Sheng, 2000; Tian, 2003). Because dementia results in progressive deterioration leading to disability and dependence, more care is required. In China, care of those with dementia typically occurs within the context of the family. This phenomenon is a reflection of familism and filial piety in the Chinese culture. Caring for a family member with dementia poses significant challenges. Unfortunately, studies related to family caregiving are not extensive in China, even though this research area has grown dramatically in Western countries over the past 2 decades. Most investigations that focus on the caregiver document the deleterious effects of caring for a person with dementia at home, including increased risk of depression, lower immune function, general health deterioration, role overload, family financial strain, and family conflict. In addition, more negative impacts of caring on caregivers can result in institutionalization of the individual with dementia with consequent rapid deterioration. Recently, there is greater focus on the positive aspects of providing care to those with dementia in the caregiving literature. These positive qualities are termed uplifts, gains, or satisfaction. Some research reveals the important mediating role of these variables in the association between caregiving stressors and adaptation. Therefore, it is important to explore the impact of caregiving by examining not only these negative consequences of caregiving, but also those seen as positive by the caregivers themselves. However, literature on the investigation of both positive and negative effects of family caregiving is underdeveloped not only in western countries but also in Asia. A literature review verifies that a shortage of systematic studies related to family caregiving in China exists, and studies on the positive impact of caregiving are especially limited. Chinese culture emphasizes the key role family plays in coping when a member becomes sick, and it also highly values the efforts that each family member contributes in order to achieve family harmony again. Therefore, how caring of elders with dementia at home affects family caregivers and whether Chinese culture significantly influences the positive and negative impact of caring are questions that need to be answered.&nbsp;&nbsp;Research Purposes: a) To describe the positive and negative impact of caregiving upon family caregivers of elders with dementia in China; b) To explore the influences that Chinese culture has on the impact of caregiving upon family caregivers of elders with dementia in China. Conceptual Framework: Pearlin's Stress Process Model (1990) will be utilized as the conceptual framework in this study. It was developed specifically for caregivers of patients with Alzheimer's disease in Western countries. The model describes not only the negative impact of caregiving (e.g., role overload, family conflict, and work conflict) but also the positive impact of caring (uplifting). It also highlights the effects of contextual factors which have a potential impact on the caregiving process. Culture is one of important variables under the contextual factors in Pearlin's model. Research Methods: A cross-sectional correlational design will be utilized in this study. A convenience sample of subjects (a cubed 65 years) diagnosed with dementia by psychiatrists and their family caregivers will be recruited from the Outpatient Clinic of Psychiatric Hospital in Beijing, China. Their family caregivers will also be (a) caring for the individual at least 4 hours per day; (b) functioning as a caregiver for at least 6 months prior to participating in the study. Caregivers will be excluded if they are currently providing care to another family member with a chronic physical or mental illness. Significance: This study will provide information that extends nurses knowledge of the positive and negative impact of caregiving upon family caregivers in the context of Chinese culture, and help nurses provide nursing interventions, which are target the positive aspect of caregiving and decrease negative impact on family caregivers.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:12:12Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:12:12Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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