2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157789
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Understanding the Nurse Manager's Work Domain
Abstract:
Understanding the Nurse Manager's Work Domain
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2009
Author:Logue, Melanie, RN, MS
P.I. Institution Name:The University of Arizona, College of Nursing
Title:Doctoral Student
Contact Address:8338 W. Rosewood Lane, Peoria, AZ, 85383-3868, USA
Contact Telephone:623-523-2765
Co-Authors:Judith A. Effken, PhD, RN, FACMI, FAAN, Professor
The purpose of this presentation is to report preliminary results of a cognitive work analysis of the nurse manager's work domain that will inform our implementation of DyNADS and help streamline future data collection by identifying data currently available on units. Cognitive work analysis (CWA) (Vicente, 1999) is a methodology derived from cognitive engineering and ecological psychology theory aimed specifically at describing complex, high technology work domains. For that reason, it seemed uniquely suited for describing the complex, high technology world of the nurse manager, although this is the first time it has been applied in this setting. In this paper, we report the results of one portion of the CWA, the work domain analysis. Methods: Setting and Sample: After obtaining University of Arizona and site approval, we interviewed 11 nurse managers, 2 nursing directors, and 2 nurse executives at three acute care hospitals in Arizona. The 1-hour interviews were audio-recorded and transcribed for analysis. Design and Procedures: The study used a descriptive design. We contacted nurse managers via email to set up the interview and inform them about the major questions we would be asking. During the interview, we explored three major areas. We asked them first to describe a typical day, using their calendars as memory aides. We then asked them to describe the major quality and safety initiatives they were currently working on - at the hospital and unit levels. Finally, we asked them to describe a safety issue they recently identified, how they learned about it, their information sources, and what interventions they took to correct the problem. Analysis: CWA begins by organizing the data into a work domain grid along two dimensions (abstraction and decomposition). The abstraction dimension includes five levels: functional purpose (e.g., quality goals), values and priorities (e.g., quality targets), goal-related functions (e.g., quality goal setting), work processes (e.g., quality improvement initiative), and work objects (e.g., quality report). Levels of abstraction also are decomposed by organizational level (e.g., hospital, division, nursing unit). The authors independently categorized the data into the grid's cells then came to consensus on the final grid, with the assistance of other team members and a CWA expert consultant. Results & Implications: The work domain analysis enabled us to identify the influence of multiple levels in the organization on the nurse manager's work domain, as well as to view that work domain through several lenses, from organization goals to the physical objects that support unit goals. This rich picture of the work domain provides an excellent description of the complex context in which nurse managers work. We are using the results to ensure that DyNADs, the Dynamic Network Analysis Decision Support Tool being designed under the auspices of the primary research, will support managers and fit well into their work flow, but the CWA methodology itself can be applied broadly.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleUnderstanding the Nurse Manager's Work Domainen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157789-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Understanding the Nurse Manager's Work Domain</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Logue, Melanie, RN, MS</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">The University of Arizona, College of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Doctoral Student</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">8338 W. Rosewood Lane, Peoria, AZ, 85383-3868, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">623-523-2765</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">mlogue@nursing.arizona.edu, melanielogue@msn.com</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Judith A. Effken, PhD, RN, FACMI, FAAN, Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The purpose of this presentation is to report preliminary results of a cognitive work analysis of the nurse manager's work domain that will inform our implementation of DyNADS and help streamline future data collection by identifying data currently available on units. Cognitive work analysis (CWA) (Vicente, 1999) is a methodology derived from cognitive engineering and ecological psychology theory aimed specifically at describing complex, high technology work domains. For that reason, it seemed uniquely suited for describing the complex, high technology world of the nurse manager, although this is the first time it has been applied in this setting. In this paper, we report the results of one portion of the CWA, the work domain analysis. Methods: Setting and Sample: After obtaining University of Arizona and site approval, we interviewed 11 nurse managers, 2 nursing directors, and 2 nurse executives at three acute care hospitals in Arizona. The 1-hour interviews were audio-recorded and transcribed for analysis. Design and Procedures: The study used a descriptive design. We contacted nurse managers via email to set up the interview and inform them about the major questions we would be asking. During the interview, we explored three major areas. We asked them first to describe a typical day, using their calendars as memory aides. We then asked them to describe the major quality and safety initiatives they were currently working on - at the hospital and unit levels. Finally, we asked them to describe a safety issue they recently identified, how they learned about it, their information sources, and what interventions they took to correct the problem. Analysis: CWA begins by organizing the data into a work domain grid along two dimensions (abstraction and decomposition). The abstraction dimension includes five levels: functional purpose (e.g., quality goals), values and priorities (e.g., quality targets), goal-related functions (e.g., quality goal setting), work processes (e.g., quality improvement initiative), and work objects (e.g., quality report). Levels of abstraction also are decomposed by organizational level (e.g., hospital, division, nursing unit). The authors independently categorized the data into the grid's cells then came to consensus on the final grid, with the assistance of other team members and a CWA expert consultant. Results &amp; Implications: The work domain analysis enabled us to identify the influence of multiple levels in the organization on the nurse manager's work domain, as well as to view that work domain through several lenses, from organization goals to the physical objects that support unit goals. This rich picture of the work domain provides an excellent description of the complex context in which nurse managers work. We are using the results to ensure that DyNADs, the Dynamic Network Analysis Decision Support Tool being designed under the auspices of the primary research, will support managers and fit well into their work flow, but the CWA methodology itself can be applied broadly.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:12:22Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:12:22Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.